Architecture takes a front seet on this new film centered on Borromini’s architecture

Saint Yves at La Sapienza, Rome, Italy. (Courtesy Kino Lorber)

Saint Yves at La Sapienza, Rome, Italy. (Courtesy Kino Lorber)

The word “sapienza” means “wisdom” in Italian. It also refers to the Church of Saint Yves at La Sapienza, 1642–1660, designed by Baroque architect Francesco Borromini. In Eugene Green’s film, La Sapienza, Borromini is a hero of the protagonist, architect Alexandre Schmid (played by Fabrizio Rongione). Borromini incorporated the remains of a 14th century church, rather than razing it, a touchstone for Schmid. Geometry reigns throughout: the building is capped by a corkscrew lantern, and triangles and semi-circles are combined with figurative elements.

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Chicago’s Field Museum becomes just second such building to get Gold under LEED EB O+M

Chicago's Field Museum (GoCal83 via Flickr)

Chicago’s Field Museum (GoCal83 via Flickr)

Chicago‘s natural history museum, the Field Museum, announced Monday it has earned a Gold rating from the U.S. Green Building Council under the LEED for Existing Buildings Operations and Maintenance (EB O+M) program, becoming just the second museum in the nation to do so. (The Madison Children’s Museum is the other.)

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Yayoi Kusama enlisted a pint-sized army to create this dotty, hallucinatory world

(Courtesy Queensland Art Gallery)

(Courtesy Queensland Art Gallery)

Admonishing your kids not to graffiti the walls may be forever futile. A new art installation by publicly deranged Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama entails children being given printed sheets of colored stickers and told to go to town on the walls, furniture, and fixtures of all-white living spaces. Everything from the upright piano to the cutlery and linens in the once-spartan rooms are dappled crazily in a disorienting clot of jarring primary colors.

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Take a look inside the winning interiors in the AIA New York’s Design Awards

Architecture, Awards, Interiors
Friday, March 13, 2015
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(Courtesy Desai Chia Architecture via AIANY)

(Courtesy Desai Chia Architecture via AIANY)

A jury of architects, landscape architects, critics, educators, and planners has named the 35 winning projects of this year’s AIA New York Chapter Design Awards. “Each winning project, granted either an ‘Honor’ or ‘Merit’ award, was chosen for its design quality, response to its context and community, program resolution, innovation, thoughtfulness, and technique,” the AIA said in a statement. “Submitted projects had to be completed by members of the AIA New York Chapter, architects/designers practicing in New York, or be New York projects designed by architects/designers based elsewhere.” Take a look at the winning teams and projects in the Interiors category below.

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New HOK stadium renderings show off St. Louis for restless Rams football franchise

A proposal for a new NFL stadium in downtown St. Louis. (HOK)

A proposal for a new NFL stadium in downtown St. Louis. (HOK)

Missouri’s football fans are savoring plans for a new NFL stadium in downtown St. Louis, but it remains unclear if the HOK-led designs will be enough to keep the Rams from leaving. Read More

Synthesis 3D prints a rocking chair

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Synthesis Design + Architecture's Durotaxis Chair showcases the unique capabilities of the Stratasys Objet500 Connex3 printer. (IMSTEPF Films)

Synthesis Design + Architecture’s Durotaxis Chair showcases the unique capabilities of the Stratasys Objet500 Connex3 printer. (IMSTEPF Films)

Durotaxis rocker features gradient mesh informed by function, ergonomics, and aesthetics.

For Synthesis Design + Architecture founding principal Alvin Huang, there is a lot to love about 3D printing. But he does not always like how the technology is applied. “I see it all the time—a lot of students just 3D print everything,” said Huang, who also teaches at the USC School of Architecture. “You see things that could have been done better, faster, or cleaner by hand. I find it a very troublesome predicament we’re in, we’re letting the tool dictate.” When Stratasys contacted Synthesis about designing a piece for their Objet500 Connex3 printer, the architects decided to turn the relationship between human and machine on its head. Instead of asking how they could implement a preconceived design using the Objet printer, they challenged themselves to create something that could only be manufactured using this particular tool. Durotaxis Chair, a prototype of which debuted at the ACADIA 2014 conference, showcases Objet’s multi-material 3D printing capabilities with a gradient mesh that visually communicates the rocker’s function and ergonomics.

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Obit> Michael Graves passes away at the age of 80

Architecture, East, Obit
Thursday, March 12, 2015
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Michael Graves. (Courtesy Michael Graves Architecture & Design)

Michael Graves. (Courtesy Michael Graves Architecture & Design)

Famed postmodernist architect Michael Graves died of natural causes today at his Princeton, New Jersey home. The architect’s passing was announced by the eponymous firm that he founded in 1964. Graves was 80 years old.

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Here are the AIA New York’s 2015 Design Award Winners in architecture

Architecture, Awards, National
Thursday, March 12, 2015
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(Courtesy REX via AIA NY)

(Courtesy REX via AIA NY)

A jury of architects, landscape architects, critics, educators, and planners has named the 35 winning projects of this year’s AIA New York Chapter Design Awards. “Each winning project, granted either an ‘Honor’ or ‘Merit’ award, was chosen for its design quality, response to its context and community, program resolution, innovation, thoughtfulness, and technique,” AIANY said in a statement. “Submitted projects had to be completed by members of the AIA New York Chapter, architects/designers practicing in New York, or be New York projects designed by architects/designers based elsewhere.” Take a look at the winning teams in the architecture category below.

View the winners after the jump.

On View> Shigeru Ban’s humanitarian architecture highlighted by the Dallas Center for Architecture

Architecture, On View, Southwest
Thursday, March 12, 2015
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Cardboard Cathedral, Christchurch, New Zealand, 2013. (Bridgit Anderson)

Cardboard Cathedral, Christchurch, New Zealand, 2013. (Bridgit Anderson)

Shigeru Ban: Humanitarian Architecture
Dallas Center for Architecture
1909 Woodall Rodgers Freeway
Dallas, Texas
Through April 25

The Dallas Center for Architecture is presenting a selection of Pritzker Prize winning architect Shigeru Ban’s disaster relief designs. Ban’s humanitarian architecture has confronted some of the world’s most devastating natural and manmade cataclysms in the last 20 years. The Japanese architect is known for his pioneering designs for United Nations refugee shelters in the mid-1990s, using inexpensive and often recycled materials such as paper tubes and cardboard to make durable, shock-proof structures.

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After a year-long search, the Met chooses David Chipperfield to design the museum’s new wing

The Met. (Flickr / Andrew Mace)

The Met. (Flickr / Andrew Mace)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art has announced that David Chipperfield has been selected to “develop a new design for the Southwest Wing for modern and contemporary art, and potentially for adjacent galleries for the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas, as well as additional operational spaces.”

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Just six logs keep this cafe warm and cozy in Buffalo, New York

Cafe Fargo in Buffalo, New York has no mechanical heating system. (Florian Holzherr)

Cafe Fargo in Buffalo, New York has no mechanical heating system. (Florian Holzherr)

Wintry Buffalo, New York is about the last place you might expect to find a building with no mechanical HVAC system. Yet that’s where a pair of architects fired up their custom-designed masonry heater, also called a kachelofen, which warms a contemporary cafe space by burning just six logs per day—even through a record-breaking winter where the average temperature was just 22.8 degrees.

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Washing your hands will never be the same with this award-winning faucet’s swirling lattice of water

(Courtesy Simin Qiu)

(Courtesy Simin Qiu)

If you’re trying to up your faucet game and new fixtures just aren’t doing the trick—we’ve got the perfect piece to impress your dinner guests when they visit the powder room. Simin Qiu, a student at the London Royal College of Art, has designed a faucet that releases water in an elegant latticework pattern. Finally, water from the tap won’t just lazily fall into your sink basin, resigned to its dreary passage into the sewers; it will do it with pizzaz!

Continue reading after the jump.

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