Four Boston design firms fill the Rose Kennedy Greenway with art at the intersection of architecture

(Courtesy Design Biennial Boston)

Marginal by Landing Studio. (Courtesy Design Biennial Boston)

Through September 25th, emerging architects and designers are being celebrated in Boston’s 4th Design Biennial. The program features installations, created by four, jury-chosen design firms, exhibited along the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway Conservancy.

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As Boston continues to ponder its Brutalist city hall, professor suggests covering the behemoth with a glass veil

(Courtesy HARRY BARTNICK)

(Courtesy HARRY BARTNICK)

Like so many Brutalist buildings around the word, Boston’s iconic City Hall has not necessarily endeared itself to the public. Since it opened in the 1960s, there have been calls to update the building, completely overhaul it, and to demolish it outright and start over. There have, of course, also been calls to preserve it.

Continue reading after the jump.

DXU Delivers Luxe Minimalism in Dekton

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DXU wrapped Porsche Design's Oak Brook, Illinois boutique in a matte black Dekton rain screen. (Courtesy Cosentino)

DXU wrapped Porsche Design’s Oak Brook, Illinois boutique in a matte black Dekton rain screen. (Courtesy Cosentino)

Sleek black rain screen reflects Porsche Design’s understated style.

In the world of high-end retail, first impressions matter. Knowing this, DXU, LLC principal Eric Styer took special care selecting a facade material for the Porsche Design boutique in Oak Brook, Illinois. Read More

Apple is planning to build a viewing platform and visitors center so you can gaze upon its Foster-designed headquarters

(CITY OF CUPERTINO VIA SILICON VALLEY BUSINESS JOURNAL)

(CITY OF CUPERTINO VIA SILICON VALLEY BUSINESS JOURNAL)

Apple’s upcoming doughnut-shaped flying saucer of a headquarters is steadily taking shape in Cupertino, California. The Norman Foster–designed, $5 billion complex obviously strays from the typical office park setup of clusters of boxy, generic buildings, but despite its starchitect design, it has attracted plenty of criticism for how little it engages with the community and the non-Apple employees who walk among us.

But apparently that’s not the whole story.

Architect proposes to urbanize the forest with these car-free, zero-waste houses disguised as trees

(Courtesy The OAS1S Foundation)

(Courtesy The OAS1S Foundation)

One Dutch architect has re-envisioned suburbia and city centers as car-free urban forests in which dwellings are disguised as trees. Raimond de Hullu’s new home designs, known as OAS1S, feature tall, slim, detached townhouses shaped like the numeral “1” as symbols of the “deep human need to become one with nature.”

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Architect Chad Oppenheim on Getting Back in Touch With Nature

Cor, Miami, Florida. (Courtesy Oppenheim Architecture + Design)

Cor, Miami, Florida. (Courtesy Oppenheim Architecture + Design)

Asked about the pros and cons of practicing architecture in South Florida, Miami-based Oppenheim Architecture + Design principal and lead designer Chad Oppenheim said, “It’s always wonderful to design buildings in a beautiful environment such as Miami.”

More after the jump.

In a commentary against waste-producing lifestyles, Indian artist creates a sculpture made from 70,000 bottle caps

(Courtesy Arunkumar HG)

(Courtesy Arunkumar HG)

Indian artist Arunkumar HG has created a somewhat tongue-in-cheek calling out of our throwaway, waste-producing lifestyles with a shoreline sculpture made from nearly 70,000 bottle screw caps. The artist amassed the collection from his neighborhood over the course of a year, carefully stacked the caps, and connected them in vertical configurations using steel filaments.

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2015 Best of Products Awards> Visionaries

Awards, National, Product
Wednesday, July 29, 2015
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vision3-1of2

(Courtesy Nissha Printing Company)

On a hot day in June, a jury convened to review nearly 400 entries to The Architect’s Newspaper first Best of Products competition. Submissions, divided over eight categories, abounded in new materials and exciting technologies, provoking a lively dialogue during the evaluation process.

Colin Brice of Mapos, Barry Goralnick of Barry Goralnick Architects, Harshad Pillai of Fogarty Finger Architecture, and architect Alison Spear generously contributed their considerable expertise and insight to the judging.

The complete roster of winners can be found in our just-published print edition, and online here. In this final installment of reporting the competition results, we recognize four products as Visionaries. Whether a prototype or already in production, these pieces caught the jury’s attention for their pursuit of pure design ideals.

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Tactical Urbanism takes time: Architecture students build downtown Portland’s first parklet despite regulatory permitting hurdles

City Terrain, Urbanism, West
Wednesday, July 29, 2015
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Portland's newest parklet designed and built by PSU architecture students. (Michael Coon)

Portland’s newest parklet designed and built by PSU architecture students. (Michael Coon)

Word is out that downtown Portland, Oregon, has its first parklet. Designed by a team of Portland State University architecture students and led by assistant architecture professor B. D. Wortham-Galvin, the 41-foot-long public park covers two parking spaces and opened in June on Southwest 4th Avenue.

Continue reading after the jump.

Here’s your first look at what Bjarke Ingels has planned for Harlem

(BIG)

(The Bjarke Ingels Group

Since setting up shop in New York, the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) has quickly become one of the most visible architecture firms in the city. It all started with the tetrahedron-shaped residential “courtscraper,” first called W57 and now dubbed Via, that is now nearing completion on 57th Street. And then there is BIG’s viewing platform at Brooklyn Bridge Park that has been likened to a Tostito. (That nickname has stuck, but the project’s funding has not.)

Now BIG’s building in Harlem.

2015 Best of Products Awards> Kitchens + Baths and Lighting

Awards, National, Product
Tuesday, July 28, 2015
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lighting-winner-3of3

The winner of the Lighting category, Running Magnet 2.0 by FLOS Architectural. (Courtesy FLOS Architectural)

On a hot day in June, a jury convened to review nearly 400 entries to The Architect’s Newspaper first Best of Products competition. Submissions, divided over eight categories, abounded in new materials and exciting technologies, provoking a lively dialogue during the evaluation process.

Colin Brice of Mapos, Barry Goralnick of Barry Goralnick Architects, Harshad Pillai of Fogarty Finger Architecture, and architect Alison Spear generously contributed their considerable expertise and insight to the judging.

While the complete roster of winners can be found in our just-published print edition, AN will be publishing the results daily over the next week. Today’s categories, Kitchens + Baths and Lighting, evidenced a trend toward efficient use of space and energy. View all of the published categories here.

View the winners after the jump.

OMA merges sport and science in this terraced building for one of England’s elite boarding schools

(Courtesy OMA)

(Courtesy OMA)

The Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) announced that its designs for a joint Sports and Sciences department for the UK’s Brighton College have been approved. The Rem Koolhaas–owned architecture practice won an invited competition in 2013, and the project was further developed and submitted for planning approval in 2015.

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