AN Exclusive: Andres Jaque Explains Why This Year’s YAP Winner “COSMO” Is Being Built In Spain

COSMO Being assembled at MoMA/PS1 in New York. (Matt Shaw)

COSMO Being assembled at MoMA/PS1 in New York. (Matt Shaw)

Each year, the MoMA/PS1 Young Architect’s Program features an exciting design by an up-and-coming architect in the courtyard for the Warm-Up series. This year Madrid- and New York–based Andres Jaque and his Office for Political Innovation will build a huge, roving sprinkler system called COSMO that will surely liven up the event. However, it is different from years past: It will be built in Spain and shipped over by boat. Why?

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With Foster rebuffed, Bjarke Ingels reveals his plans for a stepped Two World Trade Center

(Courtesy BIG)

(Courtesy DBOX/BIG)

In late 2005, Norman Foster unveiled his design for Two World Trade Center—an 88-story tower capped in four diamonds to direct the eye down toward the 9/11 Memorial, which, at the time, was still years from completion. Then, the World Trade Center site was still in the design phase, and Bjarke Ingels was a little-known architect from Denmark.

But a lot can change in a decade.

Products> Clever New Door Hardware

National, Product, Spec Sheet
Tuesday, June 9, 2015
.
Spec Sheet  
LEAD-HAFELE-Slido-80-M

(Courtesy Häfele)

Hinges, rollers, and locksets are the unheralded—and often hidden—components of a door’s design. Here’s a sampling of what’s new in functional hardware.

More after the jump.

If swoopy renderings weren’t enough, now you can fly through Zaha Hadid’s first project in Mexico

Esfera City Center. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

Esfera City Center. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

In mid-May, AN wrote about Zaha Hadid‘s first project in Mexico—a sprawling, 981-unit housing complex in Monterrey. The Esfera City Center development appears as a series of interconnected, almost pixelated, mid-rise residential buildings that are centered around a communal green space. And now it has a slick video rendering that sheds new light on the project’s design.

Watch the video after the jump.

An architect from Vancouver wants to build the world’s tallest wooden skyscraper over a roadway in Paris

Baobab in Paris. (Courtesy Michael Green Architecture)

Baobab in Paris. (Courtesy Michael Green Architecture)

Back in March, AN wrote about Rüdiger Lainer and Partners’ plan to construct a wood skyscraper in Vienna. The so-called HoHo project would rise 276 feet and be about three-quarters wood. Now, Vancouver-based architect Michael Green, whose eponymous firm is behind “the tallest mass timber building in the United States” has proposed a timber tower for Paris that would be 10 stories taller—making it the tallest such structure on earth. That is, if it gets built.

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On View> Mexico City installation puts architecture on the sidewalk

Jardineira at LIGA by TACOA Arquitetos, Mexico City (Luis Gallardo, LGM Studio).

Jardineira at LIGA by TACOA Arquitetos, Mexico City
(Luis Gallardo, LGM Studio).

Leave it to a pair of Brazilian architects to use reinforced concrete to reinvent small-scale urbanism. While North American designers turn to plywood and recycled palettes to create curbside seating, architects Fernando Falcón and Rodrigo Cerviño of the São Paulo–based practice TACOA Arquitetos shopped for rebar.

Continue reading after the jump.

TEX-FAB explores new frontiers in high performance facade design

Plasticity Pavilion. (Courtesy Andrew Vrana)

Plasticity Pavilion. (Courtesy Andrew Vrana)

The motto of Houston architecture, civic art, and product design firm METALAB is “finding new and better ways to build things.” In addition to forming the core of his professional practice, this mission aptly describes principal Andrew Vrana’s work with the Texas digital design and production network TEX-FAB.

Continue reading after the jump.

After years of delays, BKSK is set to revive this half-built luxury tower in New York’s artsy Noho district

(Courtesy BKSK)

(Courtesy BKSK)

With some financial maneuvering, the long-delayed construction site at 22 Bond Street in NoHo will finally see some action. For years, a 14-story super structure has been lurking at the coveted corner as a blatant reminder of a hotel project that went south. Now, with some refinancing, BKSK Architects will adapt the existing skeleton into an 11-story, block-through condo building.

Continue reading after the jump.

This enormous collection of towers in Mecca will become the world’s largest hotel in 2017

(Courtesy Dar Al-Handasah group)

(Courtesy Dar Al-Handasah group)

Lucrative gains from annual religious pilgrimage has the Saudi Ministry of Finance clamoring to build the world’s largest hotel in the desert of Mecca, featuring 10,000 guest rooms, four helipads, and 12 tightly clustered towers on a 10-story plinth. Crowned at its summit by one of the largest domes in the world, the $3.6 billion mega-hotel has five off-limits floors earmarked for Saudi royalty, 70 restaurants, and an entire multi-function commercial space at its base for a shopping mall, food courts, a bus station, conference center and a lavishly appointed ballroom.

More after the jump.

Wispy-looking design for Herzog & de Meuron’s new Bordeaux stadium features 900 slim columns

(Courtesy Nouveau Stade Bordeaux)

(Courtesy Nouveau Stade Bordeaux)

A new Bordeaux stadium by architects Herzog & de Meuron debunks the hulking typology of a sporting facility. The architect compares the “elegant” and “lightweight”-looking design to a “classic temple,” which doesn’t seem all that hyperbolic.

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As crucial vote looms, Toronto’s leadership divided over downtown elevated highway removal

The two proposals. (Courtesy City of Toronto)

The two proposals. (Courtesy City of Toronto)

The Toronto City Council will vote on June 21 on whether to remove a one-mile elevated section of the prominent but crumbling Gardiner East Expressway in the city’s downtown. Mayor John Tory wants to rebuild the road, but his staff, including chief city planner Jennifer Keesmaat, are advocating for removing the highway and replacing it with a pedestrian-friendly boulevard. It is unclear what the 45-member council will do. Read More

After redesigning Times Square, Snøhetta takes on crowded blocks around Penn Station

33rd Street outside Penn Station. (Flickr / Elvert Barnes)

33rd Street outside Penn Station. (Flickr / Elvert Barnes)

The frustratingly congested, obnoxiously loud, and aggressively dirty area around Penn Station is easily the worst part of Manhattan. It is the reason why tourists qualify their vacation stories about New York with “but I could never live there.” Turning the dreadful area around the station (let’s leave the hated station out of it for now) into a pleasant place where people want to spend time and not just push and shove their way through is a Herculean task, but one that Snøhetta has agreed to take on.

Continue reading after the jump.

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