Norwegian Invasion: Norsk design and architecture is having a moment

Architecture, Design, International
Wednesday, June 10, 2015
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Touchwood Chairs by Lars Beller Fjetland. (Courtesy Lars Beller Fjetland)

Touchwood Chairs by Lars Beller Fjetland. (Courtesy Lars Beller Fjetland)

When the words “Scandinavian Design” come up, most people quickly think about Finland, Sweden, and Denmark. But Norway is no slouch, either. Recently, the nation’s designers have been drumming up noise in the worlds of furniture, product design, and architecture. A string of exhibitions, a master plan for New York’s Times Square, and a robust program of roadside pavilions and viewing platforms highlight this Norsk moment.

Continue reading after the jump.

A long-abandoned New York City aqueduct reopens as bike and pedestrian path

At the High Bridge ribbon cutting. (NYC Parks Department)

City officials at the High Bridge ribbon cutting. (NYC Parks Department)

After 45 years, New York City’s oldest standing bridge has been returned to its former glory. On Tuesday, city officials and local advocates cut the ribbon on the newly-revitalized, High Bridge, which stretches 1,450 feet across the Harlem River, from Upper Manhattan to the Bronx.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Misplaced monuments: Designers take to Photoshop to transplant world landmarks in new locations

Architecture, Art, International
Wednesday, June 10, 2015
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The Eiffel Tower planted on the Bavarian Alps in Germany where the Neuschwanstein Castle stands (Courtesy DesignCrowd.com.au)

The Eiffel Tower planted on the Bavarian Alps in Germany where the Neuschwanstein Castle stands (Courtesy DesignCrowd.com.au)

When it comes to a famous landmark, to what extent does locale add to its majesty? An inventive design competition posted to Australian virtual design studio DesignCrowd explored this question with a challenge to designers to reposition the world’s most hyped monuments in all-new locations using high-resolution images.

More after the jump.

City of Atlanta seeks designs for an artistic pavilion along the Atlanta BeltLine

(Courtesy Atlanta BeltLine Inc.)

The Historic Fourth Ward Park located on the Atlanta BeltLine (Courtesy Atlanta BeltLine Inc.)

The City of Atlanta has announced a competition for the design of an outdoor cultural pavilion for prominent display on the Westside trail of the Atlanta BeltLine. The BeltLine is the most comprehensive transportation and economic development ever undertaken by the City of Atlanta, and among the largest urban redevelopment programs in the US, providing affordable workforce housing, brownfield remediation, public art, and historic preservation.

Continue reading after the jump.

AN Exclusive: Andres Jaque Explains Why This Year’s YAP Winner “COSMO” Is Being Built In Spain

COSMO Being assembled at MoMA/PS1 in New York. (Matt Shaw)

COSMO Being assembled at MoMA/PS1 in New York. (Matt Shaw)

Each year, the MoMA/PS1 Young Architect’s Program features an exciting design by an up-and-coming architect in the courtyard for the Warm-Up series. This year Madrid- and New York–based Andres Jaque and his Office for Political Innovation will build a huge, roving sprinkler system called COSMO that will surely liven up the event. However, it is different from years past: It will be built in Spain and shipped over by boat. Why?

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With Foster rebuffed, Bjarke Ingels reveals his plans for a stepped Two World Trade Center

(Courtesy BIG)

(Courtesy DBOX/BIG)

In late 2005, Norman Foster unveiled his design for Two World Trade Center—an 88-story tower capped in four diamonds to direct the eye down toward the 9/11 Memorial, which, at the time, was still years from completion. Then, the World Trade Center site was still in the design phase, and Bjarke Ingels was a little-known architect from Denmark.

But a lot can change in a decade.

Products> Clever New Door Hardware

National, Product, Spec Sheet
Tuesday, June 9, 2015
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Spec Sheet  
LEAD-HAFELE-Slido-80-M

(Courtesy Häfele)

Hinges, rollers, and locksets are the unheralded—and often hidden—components of a door’s design. Here’s a sampling of what’s new in functional hardware.

More after the jump.

If swoopy renderings weren’t enough, now you can fly through Zaha Hadid’s first project in Mexico

Esfera City Center. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

Esfera City Center. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

In mid-May, AN wrote about Zaha Hadid‘s first project in Mexico—a sprawling, 981-unit housing complex in Monterrey. The Esfera City Center development appears as a series of interconnected, almost pixelated, mid-rise residential buildings that are centered around a communal green space. And now it has a slick video rendering that sheds new light on the project’s design.

Watch the video after the jump.

An architect from Vancouver wants to build the world’s tallest wooden skyscraper over a roadway in Paris

Baobab in Paris. (Courtesy Michael Green Architecture)

Baobab in Paris. (Courtesy Michael Green Architecture)

Back in March, AN wrote about Rüdiger Lainer and Partners’ plan to construct a wood skyscraper in Vienna. The so-called HoHo project would rise 276 feet and be about three-quarters wood. Now, Vancouver-based architect Michael Green, whose eponymous firm is behind “the tallest mass timber building in the United States” has proposed a timber tower for Paris that would be 10 stories taller—making it the tallest such structure on earth. That is, if it gets built.

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On View> Mexico City installation puts architecture on the sidewalk

Jardineira at LIGA by TACOA Arquitetos, Mexico City (Luis Gallardo, LGM Studio).

Jardineira at LIGA by TACOA Arquitetos, Mexico City
(Luis Gallardo, LGM Studio).

Leave it to a pair of Brazilian architects to use reinforced concrete to reinvent small-scale urbanism. While North American designers turn to plywood and recycled palettes to create curbside seating, architects Fernando Falcón and Rodrigo Cerviño of the São Paulo–based practice TACOA Arquitetos shopped for rebar.

Continue reading after the jump.

TEX-FAB explores new frontiers in high performance facade design

Plasticity Pavilion. (Courtesy Andrew Vrana)

Plasticity Pavilion. (Courtesy Andrew Vrana)

The motto of Houston architecture, civic art, and product design firm METALAB is “finding new and better ways to build things.” In addition to forming the core of his professional practice, this mission aptly describes principal Andrew Vrana’s work with the Texas digital design and production network TEX-FAB.

Continue reading after the jump.

After years of delays, BKSK is set to revive this half-built luxury tower in New York’s artsy Noho district

(Courtesy BKSK)

(Courtesy BKSK)

With some financial maneuvering, the long-delayed construction site at 22 Bond Street in NoHo will finally see some action. For years, a 14-story super structure has been lurking at the coveted corner as a blatant reminder of a hotel project that went south. Now, with some refinancing, BKSK Architects will adapt the existing skeleton into an 11-story, block-through condo building.

Continue reading after the jump.

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