Five finalist named for 2015 MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program

Architecture, Awards, East, News
Thursday, November 13, 2014
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Hy Fi by The Living, the 2014 MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program winner (courtesy MoMA PS1)

Hy Fi by The Living, the 2014 MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program winner. (courtesy MoMA PS1)

MoMA PS1 has announced the five finals for the 2015 Young Architects Program pavilion for the annual Warm Up performance series. The program is considered one of the most prestigious showcases for emerging architects in North America. This year’s finalists hail from New York, Miami, Los Angeles, and Toronto.

View the finalists after the jump.

“Creative Architecture Machines” Dissects Maker Culture at California College of the Arts

Architecture, Newsletter, West
Wednesday, November 12, 2014
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Mataerial's "Anti-gravity object modeling."

Mataerial’s “Anti-gravity object modeling.”

On November 2nd a group of architects, builders, students, makers, educators, inventors and designers packed in for the Creative Architecture Machines Colloquium at California College of the Arts. The talk was organized by Jason Kelly Johnson of Future Cities Lab and brought together five practices working at the intersection of fabrication, computation, and making. Johnson led off the evening with an introduction to the practices and ideas behind maker culture; waxing philosophical on digital fabrication, the ubiquity of 3D printers and the future vision of what cutting edge Architecture offices will look like, complete with their own robot arms, of course.

Continue reading after the jump.

Cleveland looks to link lakefront and downtown with soaring pedestrian bridge

The suspension bridge option for Cleveland's planned pedestrian connection between downtown and the lakefront. (Courtesy parsons brinckerhoff, rosales partners)

The suspension bridge option for Cleveland’s planned pedestrian connection between downtown and the lakefront. (Courtesy Parsons Brinckerhoff, Rosales Partners)

Cleveland’s lakefront attractions and downtown have long been estranged neighbors, not easily accessed from one another without a car. The city and Cuyahoga County plan to fix that, offering a 900-foot bridge for pedestrians and bicycles that will hop over railroad tracks and The Shoreway, a lakefront highway built in the 1930s. Read More

In London, Renzo Piano’s so-called “Shardette” to rise next to so-called “Shard”

Fielden House street level. (Courtesy Renzo Piano Building Workshop)

Fielden House at street level. (Courtesy Renzo Piano Building Workshop)

With his 1,016-foot-tall glassy skyscraper, aptly dubbed “The Shard“, towering above London, and his 17-story office tower, nicknamed the “baby Shard” open nearby, it’s only fitting that Renzo Piano wants to complete the Shardian Trilogy. This week, he came one step closer to accomplishing that with unanimous approval for a 26-story residential tower called “The Shardette.” No, that is not at all the real name. For the record, it is called the Fielden House project.

Continue reading after the jump.

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Pictorial> The new Fulton Center opens in Lower Manhattan

Looking into the main hall. (Henry Melcher /AN)

Looking into the main hall. (Henry Melcher /AN)

When the new Fulton Center opened this weekend—after seven years of delays and cost overruns that lifted the project’s price tag from $750 million to $1.4 billion—New York City got two things: a modern upgrade to its transportation network and an iconic piece of architecture. With new well-lit concourses, pedestrian tunnels, escalators and elevators, and more intuitive transfer points between nine subway lines, Fulton Center will drastically improve the transit experience for the 300,000 people who pass through it every day. But even with these significant improvements, all anyone is talking about is the center’s eye-catching glass oculus and its hyperboloid Sky Reflector-Net installation. Step inside the station, and you’ll understand why.

Continue reading after the jump.

The world’s “best tall building” is Jean Nouvel’s high-rise jungle in Sydney

One Central Park in Sydney. The complex consists of two towers, one lower one taller. The lower tower has programmable mirrors (heliostat) on the roof which reflect up to the mirrors on the cantilever to reflect light dappled down into the plaza and shopping mall in the podium. (Rob Deutscher via Flickr)

One Central Park in Sydney. The complex consists of two towers, one lower one taller. The lower tower has programmable mirrors (heliostat) on the roof which reflect up to the mirrors on the cantilever to reflect light dappled down into the plaza and shopping mall in the podium. (Rob Deutscher via Flickr)

The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) last night named Atelier Jean Nouvel‘s One Central Park (OCP) in Sydney the year’s best tall building. OCP turned the site of a former brewery into a residential high-rise lush with hydroponic hanging gardens and a massive mirror cantilevered over the building’s courtyard that harvests sunlight for heat and lighting year-round. Read More

Q+A> Broad Art Foundation Director talks architecture, opening date for DS+R’s Los Angeles museum

Architecture, Q+A, Urbanism, West
Friday, November 7, 2014
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Aerial photo of the Broad (Jeff Duran/ Warren Air)

Aerial photo of the Broad (Jeff Duran/ Warren Air)

After speculation, delay, and even a blockbuster lawsuit, the $140 million Broad Museum finally announced last week that it will be opening its doors in Fall 2015, about a year behind schedule. Designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, the Downtown Los Angeles museum will contain more than 2,000 works of contemporary art—part of the Broad Art Foundation’s growing collection—and admission will be free to the public. AN West Editor Sam Lubell talked with Broad Art Foundation Director Joanne Heyler to get the latest on the project. And to get you keyed up for the eventual opening, here are some of the latest construction images. It’s getting close!

Continue reading after the jump.

Peter Zumthor’s massive LACMA addition gets initial funding

Architecture, West
Thursday, November 6, 2014
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Model of Zumthor's LACMA addition, which now spans Wilshire Boulevard (LACMA/ Museum Associates)

Model of Zumthor’s LACMA addition, which now spans Wilshire Boulevard (LACMA/ Museum Associates)

The Los Angeles Board of Supervisors yesterday approved the contribution of $125 million in bond funds to LACMA’s $600 million makeover, which, under the guidance of Peter Zumthor, would tear down most of the campus and snake over Wilshire Boulevard. The new 410,000 square foot building would open in 2023, with the remaining funding coming from private donations. According to the LA Times, LACMA director Michael Govan told the Board of Supervisors that the museum’s older buildings “are really ailing. They are not worth saving. The new building will be much more energy efficient and accessible to a broad public.”

Continue reading after the jump.

In Construction> Bjarke Ingels’ “court-scraper” tops out on 57th Street

BIG's W57. (Courtesy Field Condition)

BIG’s W57. (Courtesy Field Condition)

When we talk about the batch of luxury towers coming to 57th Street, we’re typically talking about very tall, very skinny, very glassy buildings. But not, of course, when it comes to W57—Bjarke Ingels‘ very pyramid-y addition to the street he calls a “court-scraper” for its combination of the European courtyard building with a New York skyscraper. Last time we checked in on Bjarke’s pyramid—sorry, Durst would prefer we all call it a “tetrahedron”—it was only a few stories high. That was back in June, and since then, the sure-looks-like-a-pyramid has topped out at 450 feet and crews have begun installing its facade.

Read More

Unveiled> Beloit College powerplant redevelopment by Studio Gang Architects

Architecture, Midwest, Unveiled
Wednesday, November 5, 2014
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(Studio Gang Architects)

(Studio Gang Architects)

Beloit College in south central Wisconsin powered down its natural gas-fired Blackhawk Generating Station in 2005, but the building isn’t out of steam yet. Chicago’s Studio Gang Architects will help find new life for the former Alliant Energy property, connecting it by bridge to nearby residential and academic buildings.

Continue reading after the jump.

Inaugural Chicago architecture biennial has a name, and a show by Iwan Baan

Chicago, photographed by Iwan Baan.

Chicago, photographed by Iwan Baan.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel‘s announcement that Chicago would launch an international festival of art and architecture—its own take on the famous Venice biennale—drew jeers and cheers from the design community both near and far from The Second City. AN called for the show aspiring to be North America’s largest architectural exhibition to go beyond tourism bromides.

Now the upstart expo has a name, as well as its first show. Read More

Overland Unclogs Historic Plumbing Warehouse

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Through adaptive re-use, Overland found a new home in an abandoned warehouse near San Antonio's arts district. (Courtesy Overland)

Through adaptive re-use, Overland created a new home in an abandoned warehouse near San Antonio’s arts district. (Courtesy Overland)

San Antonio firm transforms vacant industrial building into sunlit workspace.

Dissatisfied with their two-story office, San Antonio architecture practice Overland Partners recently went looking for a new home. They found it in an unexpected place: a long-vacant plumbing supply warehouse within the city’s burgeoning arts district. The 1918 Hughes Plumbing Warehouse offered the firm exactly what they wanted—a large open floor plan—in an architecturally refined package. The timber-framed, brick-clad building “is simple,” said project architect Patrick Winn, “but it’s really elegant and beautiful when you’re able to look at it.” The problem was that years of disuse had left their mark. “When we first viewed it, it was really far gone,” recalled Winn. The original windows had been broken up, and the roof had flooded. Undaunted, the architects took on an extensive renovation project, with the result that today the former plumbing distribution center is a boon not just to Overland, but to the neighborhood as a whole.
Read More

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