St. Petersburg City Council approves pier plan by ASD, Rogers Partners, and Ken Smith

ASD/ROGERS PARTNERS/KEN SMITH LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT)

ASD/ROGERS PARTNERS/KEN SMITH LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT)

The redevelopment of St. Petersburg, Florida’s iconic pier, with its very 1970s-esque inverted pyramid, is finally ready to move forward. The local city council has approved $5.2 million for the the structure’s replacement which was designed by ASD, Rogers Partners, and Ken Smith. The money will go toward finalized designs, demolition of the existing pier, and initial contract services. This has been a long time coming.

Continue reading after the jump.

Architects and artists want to turn this vacant Detroit home into a community opera house

(House Opera)

(House Opera)

Detroit‘s 90,000 vacant homes and residential lots have proven to be fertile ground for artistic exploration, giving rise to verdant floral installations and canvases for sought-after graffiti artists. Now architects and artists from The D and beyond hope to turn an abandoned property at 1620 Morrell Street into something truly surprising. Read More

On View> In the Library: Setting the Scene with Theater Architecture and Set Design

Architecture, East, On View
Tuesday, July 14, 2015
.
(Courtesy National Gallery of Art)

(Courtesy National Gallery of Art)

In the Library: Setting the Scene with Theater Architecture and Set Design
National Gallery of Art
6th and Constitution Avenue, NW
Washington, D.C.
Through October 2

Performance venues have constantly morphed with the times, from the amphitheaters of ancient times to the digitally enabled entertainment centers of today.

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Plan unveiled to transform the South Bronx with public space and waterfront access

(Courtesy Civitas and NYRP)

(Courtesy Civitas and NYRP)

The New York Restoration Project (NYRP), a non-profit founded by Bette Midler in 1995 to support public space, has unveiled its vision for a greener, cleaner, artsier, bike-friendlier, and overall healthier South Bronx. The master plan, known as the Haven Project, was created with a range of stakeholders including community groups, designers, and health professionals “to promote physical activity, improve pedestrian safety, and increase social interaction in neighborhoods saddled with some of the city’s heaviest industrial uses and suffering from high rates of poverty, diabetes, asthma and obesity.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Obama’s new national monuments preserve landscape and protect Michael Heizer’s “City”

Art, Preservation, West
Monday, July 13, 2015
.
45°, 90°, 180° from City sculpted out of concrete and dirt. (Triple Aught Foundation. Courtesy LACMA)

45°, 90°, 180° from Heizer’s City sculpted out of concrete and dirt. (Triple Aught Foundation. Courtesy LACMA)

In an act that preserved more than a million acres from development, President Obama designated three new national monuments in California, Nevada, and Texas. While the monument in central Texas protects an archeological site where Columbian Mammoths fossils were unearthed, and Berryessa Snow Mountain, the California location, staves off potential suburban encroachment, it is the Nevada monument that holds the most excitement for those with an interest in Land Art.

Continue reading after the jump.

Florida’s AIA chapter opens up the architecture polls with its 2015 People’s Choice Awards

(Courtesy AIA Florida)

(Courtesy AIA Florida)

Floridians and visitors can show their appreciation for their favorite local community buildings with AIA Florida’s 2nd Annual People’s Choice Award sponsored by the Florida Foundation for Architecture. From June 29th until July 31st, voters can choose between the 48 state-located buildings and so far 30,000 individuals have weighed in.

Continue reading after the jump.

Facades pro Michel Rojkind on value-added building envelopes

Rojkind Arquitectos and Zahner crafted a new stainless steel facade for Liverpool department store in Mexico City. (Jaime Navarro)

Rojkind Arquitectos’ Liverpool Insurgentes department store. (Jaime Navarro)

Known for their playful, cutting-edge facades, Rojkind Arquitectos are adept at transforming obstacles into opportunity.

Continue reading after the jump.

Historic Ryman Auditorium in Nashville reveals new look following $14 million expansion

National, Preservation
Friday, July 10, 2015
.
(Courtesy Steve Lowry/Ryman Auditorium)

(Courtesy Steve Lowry/Ryman Auditorium)

An historic epicenter for music and stage performances in the “Music City” of Nashville, the Ryman Auditorium, has unveiled a new face following a $14 million expansion by Nashville-based firms Hastings Architecture Associates and R.C. Mathews Contractor.

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Australian architects get planning approval for skyscraper based on Beyoncé’s curves

(Courtesy Elenberg Fraser)

(Courtesy Elenberg Fraser)

Piggybacking off the axiom that sex sells and anything Beyoncé-related has the potential to break the Internet, Australian architecture firm Elenberg Fraser has nabbed planning approval for a “Beyoncé tower” inspired by the superstar’s hourglass form.

Continue reading after the jump.

It took four years to grow this church in New Zealand out of trees

(Courtesy Treelocations)

(Courtesy Treelocations)

In New Zealand, it would appear that buildings grow on trees—or, rather, trees grow into buildings. After years of careful maintenance, Barry Cox, tree aficionado, has created a lush chapel and garden in Waikato, just south of Auckland.

Continue reading after the jump.

Photographer Wayne Thom captured Late Modernism like no one else, and now his archive is looking for a home

Sears, Roebuck and Company, Pacific Coast Territory Administrative Offices. Alhambra, CA.  A.C. Martin & Associates. design 1969, completion 1971. (Wayne Thom)

Sears, Roebuck and Company, Pacific Coast Territory Administrative Offices. Alhambra, CA. A.C. Martin & Associates. design 1969, completion 1971. (Wayne Thom)

As 1970s and 1980s architecture returns to vogue, a new recognition of those associated with its making and documentation also arises. So it is with Wayne Thom, long the preeminent architectural photographer of the large, Late Modern building by the large firm.

More after the jump.

Bike path in pieces: Skeptics dismiss Dutch solar bike path SolaRoad as inefficient “cash grab”

(Courtesy SolaRoad)

(Courtesy SolaRoad)

Naysayers have rained criticism on Dutch Solaroad solar bike path system. In the first six months of operation, it reportedly overshot energy production expectations to the collective glee of engineers. However, self-described “scientists” are taking it down with numerical rhetoric, namely the cost and inferior production capacity relative to rooftop solar panels. Last year’s pilot test ate up $3.2 million in investor funding for a 230-foot stretch of concrete, and SolaRoad remains tightlipped on the cost per square foot.

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