Minneapolis plans the country’s most climate resilient neighborhood

Minneapolis' 4th Street looking east from a location just east of 29th Ave., in a sketch of climate resilient neighborhood Prospect Park 2020. (Prospect Park 2020)

A collection of grain silos and railroad tracks next to the University of Minnesota‘s Minneapolis campus is set to become a “living laboratory” for climate resilience, according to its designers and allies in city and regional government.

COntinue reading after the jump.

New renderings and details of SHoP’s supertall Midtown tower

The facade and skyline. (Courtesy SHoP via 6sqft)

The facade and skyline. (Courtesy SHoP & JDS Development Group via 6sqft)

Despite concerns that New York City’s high-end housing bubble is about to burst, the supertall towers that have come to symbolize that upper-echelon of the market keep coming, one after the other. Now, with One57 open, and 432 Park topped off, SHoP’s 111 W. 57th Street—widely seen as the most attractive of the bunch—is preparing to head skyward. As the tower begins its roughly 1,400-foot climb, new renderings and details of the project have surfaced.

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On View> MoMA tackles tactical urbanism with “Uneven Growth: Tactical Urbanisms for Expanding Megacities”

(Courtesy MoMA)

(Courtesy MoMA)

Uneven Growth: Tactical Urbanisms for Expanding Megacities
MoMA
11 West 53rd Street, New York, New York
November 22–May 10, 2015

The population of the planet is growing quickly and an increasing number of people are living in urban areas. The resultant demographic changes, including an increase in urban poverty, pose challenges and opportunities for architects and planners in the decades ahead. How to address such a complex and global change is a question explored in the MoMA exhibition Uneven Growth: Tactical Urbanisms for Expanding Megacities.

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Under Construction> Diller Scofidio + Renfro’s Columbia University Medical and Graduate Education Building

diller scofidio + renfro's under-construction COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY MEDICAL & GRADUATE EDUCATION BUILDING. (Courtesy Field Condiiton)

diller scofidio + renfro’s under-construction COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY MEDICAL & GRADUATE EDUCATION BUILDING. (Courtesy Field Ccondition

When an under-construction project is just a skeleton of its future self, its nearly impossible to gauge the impact of the finished product. Sure, you’ve got renderings, but as AN has covered before, those are usually chock full of visual embellishments like dramatic sunsets, hot air balloons, and so. many. kayaks. So while it’s probably best to reserve judgment on Diller Scofidio + Renfro’s Columbia University Medical and Graduate Education Building until it opens in 2016, let’s just call a spade a spade right now: this thing is going to be a very dramatic, very zigzag-y addition to Washington Heights.

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David Chipperfield short-listed for Beethoven Concert Hall in Germany

Architecture, Awards, Design, International
Wednesday, November 19, 2014
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The hall at night. (Courtesy David Chipperfield Architects via  Beethoven Festspielhaus

The hall at night. (Courtesy David Chipperfield Architects via Beethoven Festspielhaus

Some of the biggest names in architecture have been whittled out of a competition to design a new Beethoven Concert Hall—or Beethoven Festspielhaus—in the composer’s hometown of Bonn, Germany. When the competition’s short list of ten proposals became an even-shorter list of three, the likes of Zaha Hadid, SnøhettaJAHN and UNStudio were sent packing. David Chipperfield, however, made it through and is joined in the final three by Valentiny hvp architects from Luxembourg and Kadawittfeldarchitektur from Germany. The new hall, which is slated to break ground in 2016, is expected to host celebrations for Beethoven’s 250th birthday in 2020, and the 200th anniversary of his death in 2027.

View the proposals after the jump.

Creek Show shines a light on Austin’s Waller Creek

High Watermark by Thoughtbarn (James Leasure)

High Water Mark by Thoughtbarn (James Leasure)

On the evening of Thursday, November 13, temperatures in Austin, Texas, dropped below freezing. In spite of the fact that most locals are unaccustomed to this degree of frigidity, more than 1,000 people turned out for Creek Show: Light Night 2014. The event, which ran from five in the evening until midnight, celebrated the unveiling of a series of light installations along Waller Creek between 5th and 9th streets.

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Biomimetic Pyramid by Burkett Design/Studio NYL

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Inspired by honeycombs and plate tectonics, the new Science Pyramid houses the Denver Botanic Garden's research and conservation efforts. (Scott Dressel-Martin)

Burkett Design/Studio NYL’s Science Pyramid houses the Denver Botanic Garden’s research and conservation efforts. (Scott Dressel-Martin)

Plate tectonics, honeycombs inspire new Denver Botanic Gardens research center.

For their new Science Pyramid, the Denver Botanic Gardens sought a design that delivered more than just aesthetic impact. “They wanted an icon, but they also wanted to show an icon can be high performance,” said Chris O’Hara, founding principal of Studio NYL. Studio NYL and its SKINS Group worked with architect Burkett Design and longtime Botanic Gardens general contractor GH Phipps to craft a structure to house the institution’s conservation and research efforts. “People think of the Botanic Gardens as a beautiful place to go, but what most of them don’t realize is what happens behind the scenes,” said O’Hara. “The whole concept was to showcase that, and to educate the public not just about what the Botanic Gardens are doing, but a little more about their environment.” Clad in a Swisspearl rain screen that serves as both roof and wall, the Science Pyramid’s biomimetic design reconsiders the relationship between the built and natural worlds.

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Video> Shanghai Talks: Ole Scheeren on human-scale skyscrapers

The Interlace in Singapore by Büro Ole Scheeren. (© Iwan Baan)

The Interlace in Singapore by Büro Ole Scheeren. (Iwan Baan)

This Fall, I served as special media correspondent for The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat‘s September symposium in Shanghai. The topic was “Future Cities: Towards Sustainable Vertical Urbanism,” and among the many architects, engineers and other tall building types I interviewed was Ole Scheeren—founder Büro Ole Scheeren and former director at OMA.

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Chicago Architectural Club calls for speculative proposals on Obama Library

(michael sorkin studio)

A previously released proposal for the Obama Presidential Library. (michael sorkin studio)

As several Chicago sites—as well as institutions in New York City and Hawaii—vie to host Barack Obama’s Presidential Library, the Chicago Architectural Club is “calling for speculative proposals” to consider the design impacts of the nation’s 14th presidential library.

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Pictorial> BIG’s Smithsonian Master Plan Revealed

Sackler Gallery from the National Mall. (Courtesy Bjarke Ingels Group)

Sackler Gallery from the National Mall. (Courtesy Bjarke Ingels Group)

As AN reported today, the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) has unveiled its master plan master plan for the Smithsonian Institute’s south campus in Washington D.C. The $2 billion plan would transform multiple cultural destinations with new systems and facilities, and create a dramatic new public space. While the project isn’t expected to be fully implemented until 2041, you can scroll through the gallery below to get a sense of what the Smithsonian and BIG have planned. Learn more about BIG’s plans over here.

View the renderings after the jump.

How Stella Tower Got Its Glory Back

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JDS Development Group and Property Markets Group's renovation of Ralph Walker-designed Stella Tower included restoring the Art Deco crown. (Courtesy JDS Development Group)

JDS Development Group and Property Markets Group’s renovation of Ralph Walker-designed Stella Tower included restoring the Art Deco crown. (Courtesy JDS Development Group)

Developers use cutting-edge technology to restore Ralph Walker crown.

When JDS Development Group and Property Markets Group purchased the 1927 Ralph Walker high-rise in Manhattan’s Hell’s Kitchen neighborhood in order to transform it into the Stella Tower condominiums, they realized that something was not quite right about the roofline. “The building had a very odd, plain parapet of mismatched brick,” recalled JDS founder Michael Stern. “We were curious about why it had this funny detail that didn’t belong to the building.” The developers tracked down old photographs of the property and were pleasantly surprised by what they saw: an intricate Art Deco thin dome crown. “We were very intrigued by putting the glory back on top of the building,” said Stern. They proceeded to do just that, deploying a combination of archival research and modern-day technology to recreate a remarkable early-twentieth-century ornament.

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Somewhere Over the Rainbow: The Pantone Hotel opens in Brussels

pantone-hotel

(Courtesy Pantone Hotel)

Winter months in the Benelux countries are not known for blue skies and bright sun. So perhaps there’s an altruistic underpinning to the design of the new 59-room Pantone Hotel in Brussels. Did architect Olivier Hannaert and interior designer Michel Pennemann seek to lift the seasonally-depressed spirits of the populace through the colorful palette? We’d like to think so, although the relentless branding campaign by the client raises a smidgen of doubt.

Continue reading after the jump.

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