Were the World Trade Center Transit Hub’s lateral struts part of the original Calatrava design?

Santiago Calatrava's World Trade Center Transit Hub. (William Menking / AN)

Santiago Calatrava’s World Trade Center Transit Hub. (William Menking / AN)

 

The World Trade Center Transportation Hub—or as its designer Santiago Calatrava likes to think of it, the “bird in flight”—is just blocks from AN‘s office, so we get to walk by and watch it try to take off regularly. But in the weeks before the holidays, odd “struts” started to be welded between the structure’s giant fins or blades.

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Here are the winners of the AIA’s 2015 Institute Honor Awards in architecture

Wild Turkey Bourbon Visitor Center. (De Leon & Primmer Architecture Workshop)

Wild Turkey Bourbon Visitor Center. (De Leon & Primmer Architecture Workshop)

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has announced the 2015 recipients of its Institute Honor Awards, which it describes as “the profession’s highest recognition of works that exemplify excellence in architecture, interior architecture and urban design.” This year’s 23 recipients were selected from out of about 500 submissions and will be honored at the AIA’s upcoming National Convention and Design Exposition in Atlanta. That event will be keynoted by former President Bill Clinton. Now onto the winners in the architecture category.

View winners of the AIA Honor Awards in Architecture.

Review> A Disciplined Approach to Misbehaving Urbanism

Mr. and Mrs. Andrews of Shadrach Woods, Freedomland. (Krumwiede)

Mr. and Mrs. Andrews of Shadrach Woods, Freedomland. (Krumwiede)

Keith Krumwiede’s Freedomland, an exhibition of architectural misfits, suburban follies, and developer nightmares, that just closed at the Princeton University School of Architecture Gallery, defies easy categorization. The pulse of the work is strong, its intention clear: to satirize the cringe-worthy packaging and wholesaling of a particular strain of the American dream of mass-produced, individualized suburban living by Toll Brothers and others through a series of reconfigured catalogue house plans.

Continue reading after the jump.

It’s Friday, so why not let this drone give you a birds-eye tour of New York City?

Screenshot from "Ultimate Aerial Video of NYC!"

Screenshot from “Ultimate Aerial Video of NYC!”

We know, we know, we know—the internet is being overrun with drone-photographed, time-lapse videos of cities and ruins. They are like cat videos, or BuzzFeed quizzes, or thought-pieces on Hillary Clinton’s ground game in 2016: they’re everywhere and they’re unavoidable. But sometimes they’re pretty great. This five-minute video by Victor Chu is called “Ultimate Aerial Video of NYC!,” and, well, yeah, it kind of is!

Watch the video after the jump.

Hotel that inspired The Shining wants you to design its 10,100-square-foot hedge maze

The Shining maze.

The Shining maze.

If you haven’t seen or read the entirety of The Shining then you’re going to want to fix that right away—like, right now. Use the time you would have spent reading this 225-word story with, say, watching the two-and-a-half hour film. It’s great; you’ll love it. Okay, with that disclaimer out of the way, let’s continue. You’ll want to continue.

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Preservationists watchful as New York’s American Museum of Natural History taps Jeanne Gang for addition

Architecture, East, News, Preservation
Thursday, January 8, 2015
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The Rose Center at the American Museum of Natural History (David Sundberg/ESTO)

The Rose Center at the American Museum of Natural History (David Sundberg/ESTO)

Last year, Chicago-based Studio Gang Architects opened a New York office, and now it is clear they made a smart decision in doing so: the firm has been selected to design a six story addition to the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. The current museum complex is an eclectic jumble of architecture styles, and it’s most recent addition is the Rose Center for Earth and Space by the Polshek Partnership (now Ennead).

Continue reading after the jump.

Louis Armstrong House Museum’s new center by Caples Jefferson ready to break ground in Queens

Architecture, East, News
Thursday, January 8, 2015
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Louis Armstrong House Museum (Courtesy Caples Jefferson Architects)

Louis Armstrong House Museum (Courtesy Caples Jefferson Architects)

The Louis Armstrong House Museum, a National Historic Landmark in Corona, Queens, has received the green light from the city to start construction on its long awaited expansion plans. Located across the street from the renowned jazz trumpeter and singer’s restored home, the new $20 million addition, designed by Long Island City-based firm Caples Jefferson, will house exhibition space, designated research areas, and a “Jazz Room” for musicians.

Continue reading after the jump.

Snøhetta, Allied Works, and others propose dramatic schemes for Obama library In Hawaii

Architecture, Unveiled, West
Thursday, January 8, 2015
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View from the roof of the proposed center. (Luxigon, Architect & Landscape Architect: Snøhetta and WCITARCHITECTURE)

Not to be outdone by proposals in Chicago and New York, Snøhetta and WCITARCHITECTURE have thrown their hats into the ring for the Obama Presidential Library, sketching a unique building in the President’s home state of Hawaii. If selected, their Barack Obama Presidential Center, affiliated with the University of Hawaii in Honolulu, would take its cues from the forms of both a coral reef and the area’s undulating topography.

Continue reading after the jump.

Deadline approaching for Docomomo’s 2015 Modernism in America Awards

Stillman I After: Marcel Breuer, architect. Bedroom deck restored. Sliding glass wall recreated. Screen porch removed. Low block walls replaced. (Brad Stein and Joseph Mazzaferro)

Stillman I After: Marcel Breuer, architect. Bedroom deck restored. Sliding glass wall recreated. Screen porch removed. Low block walls replaced. (Brad Stein and Joseph Mazzaferro)

 

Docomomo is one of our most valuable national architecture organizations. It fights to preserve modern architecture, sites, and neighborhoods even when it is not publicly popular (think of the Paul Rudolph’s Orange County Government Center) in all parts of the country. Now the organization known for its advocacy and preservation of contemporary built culture is sponsoring its second Modernism in America Awards to celebrate the people and projects working to preserve and rehabilitate mid-century modern buildings.

Continue reading after the jump.

University of Chicago releases details on Obama Library proposal

A rendering of South Stony Island Avenue, part of the University of Chicago's proposal for the Barack Obama Presidential Library. (Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, The University of Chicago)

A rendering of South Stony Island Avenue, part of the University of Chicago’s proposal for the Barack Obama Presidential Library. (Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, The University of Chicago)

While speculation around the Barack Obama Presidential Library continues to swirl, plans for one of the project’s four potential sites just became a bit clearer. The University of Chicago, where the President taught law, made public this week new renderings and details of their bid for the nation’s 14th such library, trotting out sunny images that show the economic development potential of investment in the South Side areas surrounding Washington Park.

Continue reading after the jump.

California breaks ground on High Speed Rail system that will one day connect Sacramento with San Diego

Transportation, West
Wednesday, January 7, 2015
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Rendering of HSR train moving through the Tehachapi Pass (CA HSR Authority)

Rendering of HSR train moving through the Tehachapi Pass (CA HSR Authority)

It’s not often that the eyes of the country are fixed on Fresno. But this week, after years of fights and dozens of lawsuits, California’s $68 billion High Speed Rail system is finally breaking ground there. The system, funded largely by state and federal money (much of that is still pending), is expected to eventually extend 800 miles from Sacramento to San Diego and include 24 stations. A route from San Francisco to Los Angeles is expected by 2029.

Continue reading after the jump.

Gould Evans Rewraps Kansas Library

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Rather than adding on to one end of the existing structure, Gould Evans wrapped a new reading room and terra cotta facade around the old Lawrence Public Library. (Courtesy Gould Evans)

Rather than adding on to one end of the existing structure, Gould Evans wrapped a new reading room and terra cotta facade around the old Lawrence Public Library. (Courtesy Gould Evans)

Terra cotta rain screen transforms brutalist eyesore into energy-efficient community space.

Considered an aesthetic and functional failure almost since its construction in 1974, the old public library in Lawrence, Kansas, was overdue for a renovation four decades later. Gould Evans‘ challenge was to transform the low-slung brutalist behemoth, a poor environmental performer lacking both adequate daylighting and a sense of connection to the community, into an asset. “The desire was to try to come up with a building that basically reinvented the library for the community,” said vice president Sean Zaudke. Rather than tacking an addition on to one end of the existing structure, the architects elected to wrap a 20,000-square-foot reading room and open stacks area around the old facade. In so doing, they altered the exterior for the better, swapping bare concrete for an earth-hued terra cotta rain screen punctuated by plentiful glazing. They also significantly enhanced the library’s environmental performance, with early estimates suggesting that the new Lawrence Public Library will see a 50 percent reduction in energy usage despite a 50 percent increase in square footage.

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