You’ll want to stop by the Dia in New York City to see LaMonte Young’s “truly immersive” Dream House

Art, East, On View
Friday, April 17, 2015
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(Courtesy Dia Art Foundation)

(Courtesy Dia Art Foundation)

In New York in the 1960s and ’70s, a movement against pictorial, illusionistic, or fictive art began to favor more direct and literal figurations. This movement—now called Minimalism by many—was often spatial in nature as it was drawn on flat surfaces, sculpted, and displayed in white box galleries.

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JetBlue wants to turn Eero Saarinen’s iconic TWA terminal into a hotel

An old TWA drawing of its terminal in the 1960's via Todd Lappin/Flickr.

A 1960’s drawing of the TWA Terminal. (Flickr / Todd Lappin)

JetBlue Airlines—the one with free snacks and live television—is interested in getting into the hotel business, and it wants to kick things off with Eero Saarinen‘s swooping TWA Terminal at JFK Airport.

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Yes, there’s a Museum of Barbed Wire in Lacrosse, Kansas showcasing 2,400 different varieties—and yes, it’s legit

Design, Midwest
Friday, April 17, 2015
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(Courtesy KansasTravel.org)

(Courtesy KansasTravel.org)

It’s hard to refrain from making barbed jokes about the Kansas Museum of Barbed Wire when it sounds like a half-hearted April Fool’s ruse, but yes, this place is actually real.

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These competition-winning bus shelters in Austin will harvest rainwater for a pocket park

(Courtesy Capital Metropolitan Transportation Authority)

(Courtesy Capital Metropolitan Transportation Authority)

It’s a matter of time before the canine-abused fire hydrant is outfitted with its own sound system—like this park bench. Two designers are retooling a high-traffic bus stop in Austin, Texas, to incorporate a pocket park for city dwellers to revisit distant nature.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Beneath this 200 year old monument to George Washington, a time capsule filled with 3D printed scans will send messages to the future

East, Preservation, Technology
Friday, April 17, 2015
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(Ed Gunts)

(Ed Gunts)

What do you put in a 21st century time capsule inside the cornerstone of a 19th century landmark that’s undergoing restoration? If the landmark is the nation’s first monument to George Washington, you put in a 3D printed likeness of the first president, hot off the 3D printer, of course. That’s the idea behind the four shiny objects that will be sealed within an 1815-era cornerstone and placed below the base of the Washington Monument in Baltimore, Maryland, home of the aforementioned first monument to Washington.

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Beantown Goes Deep Green with ISA

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Interface Studio Architects' 226-232 Highland was the first project built under Boston's E+ Green Building Program. (Sam Oberter)

Interface Studio Architects’ 226-232 Highland was the first project built under Boston’s E+ Green Building Program. (Sam Oberter)

Boston launches a sustainable housing initiative with net-zero energy townhomes.

As anyone who has come into contact with Red Sox Nation knows, Bostonians tend not to believe in half measures. A case in point is the city’s E+ Green Building Program, a joint initiative of the Office of Environment & Energy Services, the Department of Neighborhood Development, and the Boston Redevelopment Authority. Designed to demonstrate the feasibility of building net-zero energy, multi-unit housing in an urban context, the program made its built debut in 2013 with 226-232 Highland Street, a development consisting of four three-bedroom townhomes in Boston‘s Roxbury neighborhood. The building achieved substantial energy savings on a tight budget in part through a highly insulated facade constructed from conventional materials. “The envelope is key,” explained Interface Studio Architects (ISA) principal Brian Phillips. “We design many super high performance projects and we believe strongly in the quality of the envelope as the starting point.”
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French Architect Jean Nouvel Wins Lawsuit Against Controversial Philharmonie de Paris

Architecture, International
Thursday, April 16, 2015
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(Courtesy Philharmonie de Paris)

(Courtesy Philharmonie de Paris)

The Paris Supreme Court has ruled in favor of French architect Jean Nouvel, who filed a lawsuit against the Philharmonie de Paris in December last year alleging “non-compliance” with his designs. Pending his April 16 hearing, Nouvel requested a court order to be legally disassociated from the project.

Continue reading after the jump.

Orphaned segment of Minneapolis skyway destined for art installation, modernist lakeside home

(Dream the Combine)

(Dream the Combine)

In February, a Twin Cities design firm advertised an unusual yard sale of sorts. CityDeskStudio offered to pay $5,000 to whomever could haul away and repurpose an 84-foot long section of Minneapolis‘ famous skyway system that once spanned South 5th Street. The skyway segment is now headed to a private residence in Brainerd, Minnesota—but not before playing host to a contemplative art installation that examines the philosophical dimensions of this defunct piece of pedestrian infrastructure.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Last House Standing: Photographer Captures Haunting Images of Lone, Abandoned Row Houses

(Courtesy Ben Marcin)

‘Last House Standing’ by Ben Marcin (Courtesy Ben Marcin)

Like a lone pea out of its pod, the desolation of a solo row house waxes stark in Baltimore-based photographer Ben Marcin’s new series: Last House Standing. Often painted in garish colors at variance with their boarded-up windows and battered brickwork, the row houses are an architectural quirk of certain cities along the eastern seaboard.

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Architecture That Doesn’t Interrupt: Diamond-Shaped Complex in China Integrates Landscape, Buildings, and Walkways

(Courtesy Duocai Photography)

(Courtesy Duocai Photography)

Beijing-based architecture practice HHD_FUN set an example for architecture that doesn’t infringe on greenery, preserving 100 percent of the vegetation on the site where the ‘Earthly Pond Service Center’ was built.

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Chinese developers see gold in Downtown Los Angeles

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(courtesy Gensler/ Shenzhen-Hazens)

It’s a good time to be a Chinese developer in Downtown Los Angeles. Beijing-based Oceanwide and Shanghai-based Greenland are already building two of the largest projects in the city: Fig Central and Metropolis. Now according to LA Downtown News, Shenzhen-based Shenzhen-Hazens has announced plans to build a $700 million, Gensler-designed project on Figueroa street across from LA Live.

Continue reading after the jump.

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