ODA unveils amenity-packed zigzagging rental building in Bushwick

(Courtesy ODA)

(Courtesy ODA)

ODA has unveiled renderings for a massive new residential complex in Bushwick, Brooklyn—and it certainly reminds us of Bjarke Ingels’ 8 House in Copenhagen with its doughnut-like shape and landscaped roof that dips toward the street. At nearly 400,000 square feet, ODA’s 10 Montieth Street will become a major piece in the redevelopment of the Rheingold Brewery site.

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Sir Peter Cook Provides Worthy “Audience” At Woodbury Thesis Exhibition

Architecture, Dean's List, West
Friday, March 20, 2015
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Arthur Nesterenko, degree project (Arthur Nesterenko)

Arthur Nesterenko, degree project (Arthur Nesterenko)

Earlier this month AN West Coast Editor Sam Lubell joined Sir Peter Cook and Woodbury University students and faculty at WUHO Gallery in Hollywood for Drawing Room: An Audience with Sir Peter Cook, an exhibition of thesis and degree projects and an informal discussion.

More after the jump.

Brooklyn Building Defects: Building boom leads to building problems

Architecture, Development, East
Friday, March 20, 2015
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500 4th Avenue in Brooklyn. (Courtesy Google)

500 4th Avenue in Brooklyn. (Courtesy Google)

Many of the new condominiums erected in Brooklyn during the last building boom are not aging well. The New York Times reported that “[w]hen the housing market collapsed in 2007 and coffers ran dry, many developers were left scrambling to complete projects. Some cut corners or abandoned developments, leaving others to finish the work.” This led to poorly constructed buildings and angry residents who are stuck dealing with mold, cracking balconies, and flooding. One such building even saw part of its facade fall off. Now many of the developers behind the shoddy buildings are breaking ground on new projects, hopefully with more attention to quality.

Chicago wants your ideas for the future of the Chicago River

Chicago riverwalk (Courtesy Sasaki Associates)

Chicago’s riverwalk is undergoing a massive expansion, but what’s next? (Courtesy Sasaki Associates)

What’s downstream for the Chicago River? Mayor Rahm Emanuel this week directed a panel of experts to draft a long-term plan for the network of Chicago-area waterways, announcing $350,000 in grants from the Joyce Foundation, the Chicago Community Trust, and steel company ArcelorMittal to start a project dubbed “Great Rivers Chicago.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Jaklitsch/Gardner’s Three-Part Ode to Tokyo

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Jaklitsch/Gardner Architects' flagship Tokyo store for Marc Jacobs features a lantern-like, non-occupiable top story sheathed in punched aluminum. (Liao Yusheng)

Jaklitsch/Gardner Architects’ flagship Tokyo store for Marc Jacobs features a lantern-like, non-occupiable top story sheathed in punched aluminum. (Liao Yusheng)

Marc Jacobs flagship store features a tripartite facade of aluminum, tile, and glass.

Commissioned to design Marc Jacobs‘ flagship Tokyo store, Jaklitsch/Gardner Architects‘ first order of business was to rectify the desire for an iconic urban presence with strict local regulations. To make the 2,800-square-meter shop more visible from nearby Omotesando Street, the architects took advantage of a loophole in the building code that allowed them to double the height of the structure as long as the top half was not occupiable. The catch was that the code required a 500-millimeter gap between the occupiable and non-occupiable spaces. “Our first strategy was to create a louvered facade system that would disguise [the divide],” recalled principal Stephan Jaklitsch. But after an afternoon walk through the Imperial gardens, they reversed course. “We were inspired by the vernacular architecture,” said project architect Jonathan Kirk. “We wanted to somehow utilize the language of proportions, but also the materiality within that experience. Rather than trying to create something that was monolithic, we began to look at different materials for each of the building’s components.” The result, called Tōrō Ishi Ku (lantern-rock-void), makes its mark on the city with a tripartite facade in punched aluminum, bespoke tile, and glass.
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Gensler is adding a smaller sibling to the JW Marriott at L.A. Live

Architecture, Urbanism, West
Thursday, March 19, 2015
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la-fi-property-report-jw-marriott-tower-jpg-20150304

The new hotel (left) will be shorter, more angular, and less bulbous than its relative. (LA Live)

Gensler’s Los Angeles football stadium may be in trouble (still, not dead), but the firm is busy as ever. Their latest news is the expansion of the JW Marriott and Ritz-Carlton in Downtown Los Angeles, creating the second largest hotel in California.

Continue reading after the jump.

Talk About Exclusive: SOM’s Four Seasons Bahrain Bay Built on Man-Made Private Island

(Courtesy Four Seasons Bahrain Bay)

(Courtesy Four Seasons Bahrain Bay)

Conceptualized as a gateway to the budding tourist destination city of Bahrain, the Four Seasons Bahrain Bay Hotel looks like it could measure up to its zealous marketing.

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Review> Richard Estes’s photorealistic paintings of New York on view at the Museum of Arts and Design

Architecture, Art, East, Newsletter, On View, Review
Wednesday, March 18, 2015
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Richard Estes, The Plaza's Plaza from a city bus, 1991.

Richard Estes, The Plaza’s Plaza from a city bus, 1991.

Richard Estes: Painting New York City
Museum of Arts & Design
New York
Through September 20, 2015

The first exhibition of art at this institution originally and primarily devoted to craft consists of photorealist paintings spanning 50 years by one of the most accomplished masters of the style. And in the dispassionate way typical of this artist and the genre, they show some subtle changes that have taken place in the cityscape.

Continue reading after the jump.

It will cost $11 billion to fix the Port Authority Bus Terminal, so says the Port Authority

Development, East, Transportation
Wednesday, March 18, 2015
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Port Authority Bus Terminal. (Flickr /  Eric Allix Rogers)

Port Authority Bus Terminal. (Flickr /
Eric Allix Rogers)

The Port Authority of New York & New Jersey claimed it will cost $11 billion to overhaul its supremely hated bus terminal in Manhattan. Yes, everyone agrees the place is pretty much a dump, but $11 billion? That sure seems steep.

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Skyscraper Expert Antony Wood Calls for a Facades Revolution

Battery Park high-rises, New York City. (Anthony Quintano/Flickr)

Battery Park high-rises, New York City. (Anthony Quintano/Flickr)

As the director of the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, Dr. Antony Wood spends a lot of time thinking about the high-rise envelope, which he calls “its single most important interface to the external environment.” For decades, hermetically sealed glass was the gold standard in facade design for tall buildings. With sustainability an increasingly urgent priority, things have begun to change for the better, says Wood. “But we have barely scratched the surface,” he argues. “So much more needs to be done.” Wood will issue his call to action next month in a talk and subsequent panel discussion at Facades+ NYC, the premier conference on high performance building envelopes.

Continue reading after the jump.

Remember the Battery Park City wheatfield? Conceptual artist is back with a horticultural pyramid in Queens

(Courtesy Socrates Sculpture Park)

(Courtesy Socrates Sculpture Park)

Monuments of pre-civilization feats in construction and engineering, pyramids are the latest muse of conceptual artist Agnes Denes who, in 1982, transformed what is now Battery Park City into a two-acre wheatfield.

Continue reading after the jump.

English group spearheads effort to save the early Brutalist Robin Hood Gardens

robin-hood-england

Robin Hood Gardens. (Luke Hayes)

What do the English have against works produced by members of the Independent Group? The loose post–World War II group of artists, architects, writers, and critics produced public art, gallery installations, and even architecture. On this side of the Atlantic we always think the Brits save their landmarks—unlike the American tendency to tear them down before they can be landmarked.

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