100 Fountains will revive New York City’s esteemed public drinking culture

City Terrain, Design, East, Urbanism
Tuesday, December 15, 2015
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A drinking fountain on the High Line (Eden, Janine and Jim / Flickr)

A drinking fountain on the High Line (Eden, Janine and Jim / Flickr)

Water, water, everywhere,
Nor any drop to drink.
—Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

Though New York has the some of the cleanest municipal tap water, New Yorkers now consume 1.25 billion bottles of water annually. A contributing factor to the rise in bottled water consumption is the decline in the number of public drinking fountains. New York–based Pilot Projects would like to revive the grand tradition of public bubblers through a novel design/build competition.

More after the jump.

Archtober Building of the Day 21> Cary Leeds Center for Tennis & Learning by GLUCK+

Architecture, East
Wednesday, October 21, 2015
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(Julia Cohen)

(Julia Cohen)

Cary Leeds Center for Tennis & Learning
Crotona Park, the Bronx
GLUCK+

Today’s Archtober Building of the Day tour of the Cary Leeds Center for Tennis & Learning in the Bronx offered a close-up view of GLUCK+’s construction process. The firm works in the architect-led design-build model, in which the architect also serves as the project’s general contractor. Our group of inquisitive participants asked GLUCK+ Principal Marc Gee about how this process works, from the company’s insurance requirements to day-to-day life in the office. According to Gee, the system works because “architects are able to think on their feet in terms of design, not just the project’s bottom line.”

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New York City launches interactive maps that reveal the minutia of neighborhood-level data

East, News, Technology
Wednesday, October 14, 2015
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(Courtesy City of New York)

(Courtesy City of New York)

Busybodies and neighborhood know-it-alls rejoice: today, New York City, in partnership with civic data managers Vizalytics, launched a beta version of neighborhood.nyc, a new website that maps street-level information derived from 311 calls and city agencies.

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Aim High, Get Low: New “Lowline” linear park eyed in the Bronx

View of the proposed lowline from Rae Street (Google Maps)

View of the proposed lowline from Rae Street (Google Maps)

Call it High Line fever: since the first leg of James Corner and Diller Scofidio + Renfro’s High Line debuted in 2009, High Line–like projects have popped up all over the city and across the country. Now, not ten miles from the original, the Bronx may be slated for its very own rail-to-park conversion.

More after the jump.

Review> Paul Gunther on preservation and the ongoing exhibit, Saving Place: 50 Years of New York City Landmarks

Grand Central Terminal, 2014. (Iwan Baan)

Grand Central Terminal, 2014. (Iwan Baan)

Saving Place: 50 Years of New York City Landmarks
An exhibition at the Museum of the City of New York and Catalog edited by Donald Albrecht, Andrew Dolkart, and Seri Worden
Through January 3, 2016

Since the first trace of the species homo sapiens, human evolution only represents four one hundred thousandths of one percent of the earth’s age. In proportion to an 80-year life span, that means just 31 hours—less than a day and a half of the 701,280 hours lived.

With the existential threat of climate change and ecological ruination gaining traction in collective consciousness—combined with the outsized expectations of breath-holding fundamentalists for whom earth’s rapturous end can’t come soon enough—our sense of what permanence means has begun to shift. If all human culture to date is just four-dozen millennia and we’ve wreaked so much havoc already, “forever” strikes a dubious chord.

Continue reading after the jump.

Plan unveiled to transform the South Bronx with public space and waterfront access

(Courtesy Civitas and NYRP)

(Courtesy Civitas and NYRP)

The New York Restoration Project (NYRP), a non-profit founded by Bette Midler in 1995 to support public space, has unveiled its vision for a greener, cleaner, artsier, bike-friendlier, and overall healthier South Bronx. The master plan, known as the Haven Project, was created with a range of stakeholders including community groups, designers, and health professionals “to promote physical activity, improve pedestrian safety, and increase social interaction in neighborhoods saddled with some of the city’s heaviest industrial uses and suffering from high rates of poverty, diabetes, asthma and obesity.”

Continue reading after the jump.

New York City wants someone to turn a notorious detention center into a dynamic live/work community

Spofford Juvenile Detention Center. (Courtesy NYCEDC)

Spofford Juvenile Detention Center. (Courtesy NYCEDC)

The New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC) is looking for developers eager to turn an abandoned juvenile detention center in the Bronx into the city’s “next creative live/work community.”

More after the jump.

A long-abandoned New York City aqueduct reopens as bike and pedestrian path

At the High Bridge ribbon cutting. (NYC Parks Department)

City officials at the High Bridge ribbon cutting. (NYC Parks Department)

After 45 years, New York City’s oldest standing bridge has been returned to its former glory. On Tuesday, city officials and local advocates cut the ribbon on the newly-revitalized, High Bridge, which stretches 1,450 feet across the Harlem River, from Upper Manhattan to the Bronx.

COntinue reading after the jump.

With this purchase of five acres of waterfront land, is the South Bronx New York’s newest development hot spot?

Development, East, News, Skyscrapers
Tuesday, March 17, 2015
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(Courtesy Bing)

(Courtesy Bing)

The Chetrit Group and Somerset Partners are betting big on the Bronx. The developers have recently purchased 5 acres of industrial land along the Harlem River. The Wall Street Journal reported that they plan to build up to six 25-story market-rate apartment towers on the land.

Continue reading after the jump.

MTA Off Track: Record ridership just one of the problems facing New York City transit

City Terrain, East, Transportation
Thursday, March 5, 2015
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A crowded subway platform in New York City. (Ianqui Doodle / Flickr)

A crowded subway platform in New York City. (Ianqui Doodle / Flickr)

Overcrowding on New York City subway trains is becoming a major problem for commuters. According to new data from the MTA, there were 14,843 weekday delays caused by overcrowding in December alone. The New York Post found that the number is up 113 percent from the same period a year ago. Fixing the overcrowding will not be easy for the MTA as it is trying to accommodate record ridership and still dealing with damage from Superstorm Sandy.

It’s Friday, so why not let this drone give you a birds-eye tour of New York City?

Screenshot from "Ultimate Aerial Video of NYC!"

Screenshot from “Ultimate Aerial Video of NYC!”

We know, we know, we know—the internet is being overrun with drone-photographed, time-lapse videos of cities and ruins. They are like cat videos, or BuzzFeed quizzes, or thought-pieces on Hillary Clinton’s ground game in 2016: they’re everywhere and they’re unavoidable. But sometimes they’re pretty great. This five-minute video by Victor Chu is called “Ultimate Aerial Video of NYC!,” and, well, yeah, it kind of is!

Watch the video after the jump.

If these five architecture teams get their way, the library of the future will look a lot different than today

An public library outpost by L+. (Courtesy SITU Studio)

An public library outpost by L+. (Courtesy SITU Studio)

New York City’s public libraries need cash—and they need it fast. Over the years, the city’s three library systems—the New York Public Library (serving Manhattan, the Bronx, and Staten Island), the Brooklyn Public Library, and the Queens Public Library—have racked up over one billion dollars in capital needs. And that’s not money needed for new educational tech tools, like iPads and laptops, but for renovations just to keep the old buildings in a state of good repair.

Continue reading after the jump.

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