West 8 to remake a boulevard in Rotterdam into a pedestrian and cyclist–oriented thoroughfare

Renderings of the Coolsingel. Courtesy West 8

Renderings of the Coolsingel. (Courtesy West 8)

This month, Adriaan Visser of Rotterdam‘s city council and Adriaan Geuze, principal of landscape architecture firm West 8, unveiled a new plan for the municipality’s 0.6 mile long Coolsingel. The streetscape aims to restore the allure of the 19th century boulevard which once defined the area.

More after the jump.

After redesigning Times Square, Snøhetta takes on crowded blocks around Penn Station

33rd Street outside Penn Station. (Flickr / Elvert Barnes)

33rd Street outside Penn Station. (Flickr / Elvert Barnes)

The frustratingly congested, obnoxiously loud, and aggressively dirty area around Penn Station is easily the worst part of Manhattan. It is the reason why tourists qualify their vacation stories about New York with “but I could never live there.” Turning the dreadful area around the station (let’s leave the hated station out of it for now) into a pleasant place where people want to spend time and not just push and shove their way through is a Herculean task, but one that Snøhetta has agreed to take on.

Continue reading after the jump.

Chicago beckons pedestrians with Dr. Seussian green and blue dots

The view of Chicago's Lincoln/Wellington/Southport intersection as part of the “Lincoln Hub” traffic calming  and placemaking project, as seen from St. Alphonsus Church. (John Greenfield)

The view of Chicago’s Lincoln/Wellington/Southport intersection as part of the “Lincoln Hub” traffic calming and placemaking project, as seen from St. Alphonsus Church. (John Greenfield)

Who polka dotted West Lakeview? The area around the Lincoln/Wellington/Southport intersection on Chicago‘s North Side looks like a giant game of Twister, as Streetsblog’s John Greenfield points out, thanks to a whimsical, low-tech placemaking initiative that is part of a larger $175,000 streetscape project along Lincoln Avenue. Read More

Iowa City picks Cecil Balmond for downtown art project

Art, City Terrain, Midwest, News, Urbanism
Thursday, February 12, 2015
(Iowa City)

(Genus Landscape Architects / Iowa City)

Iowa City this week picked engineer-turned-artist Cecil Balmond to anchor an overhaul of the city’s downtown pedestrian plaza. His sculpture will be the focal point of Iowa City’s Black Hawk Mini Park Art Project, the first phase of an $11 million streetscape redevelopment project that officials hope to start next year. Read More

Before & After> Gustafson Guthrie Nichol Imagines a Pedestrian-Friendly Seattle


The streets of downtown Seattle are set for a major overhaul, thanks to a new masterplan by Gustafson Guthrie Nichol. As AN reported in our recent West Coast edition, the Seattle-based firm has made recommendations to improve the pedestrian realm “centers on uniting the fragmented parts of the Pike-Pine corridor, two major thoroughfares at the heart of the retail core running east-west from Interstate 5 to the waterfront.”

Check out their dramatic proposed transformations overlayed on Seattle’s existing streetscape for a better look at how pedestrians and cyclists will fare under the plan.

More after the jump.

St. Louis Plan Calls for Form-Based Code to Push Transit-Oriented Development

Monday, September 16, 2013


For nextSTL, Richard Bose takes a close look at what’s next for St. Louis’ transit-oriented neighborhood. The Skinker-DeBaliviere neighborhood and the area near the Delmar and Forest Park MetroLink stations (both Red and Blue lines) have six bus routes. They’re near the forthcoming Loop Trolley line. A Department of Housing and Urban Development–funded sustainability plan, called OneSTL is examining opportunities for transit-oriented development near MetroLink stops.

Continue reading after the jump.

Creative Corridor Plan Unveiled to Revitalize Little Rock

National, Newsletter
Friday, December 21, 2012
Aerial view of Main Street's Creative Corridor (Courtesy Marlon Blackwell Architect & Steve Luoni)

Aerial view of Main Street’s Creative Corridor. (Courtesy Marlon Blackwell Architect & Steve Luoni)

Marlon Blackwell, architect and professor at the Fay Jones School of Architecture, and Steve Luoni, architect and director of the University of Arkansas Community Design Center, have unveiled a masterplan for converting Little Rock’s Main Street into a cultural center. The plan titled, The Creative Corridor: A Main Street Revitalization will include a pedestrian promenade, outdoor furniture, LED lighting installations, rain gardens, affordable living-units for artists and a renovation of downtown buildings for mixed-use. Luoni notes that execution is expected to occur in phases.

Continue reading after the jump.

Re-Imagining the Urban Experience at Boston’s Downtown Crossing

Wednesday, December 12, 2012
KMDG's Proposal for Downtown Crossing's New Streetscape Design Standards & Wayfinding Program (Courtesy of the Boston Redevelopment Authority)

KMDG’s Proposal for Downtown Crossing’s New Streetscape Design Standards & Wayfinding Program (Courtesy of the Boston Redevelopment Authority)

Condos and retail developments aren’t the only changes coming to Boston’s Downtown Crossing. Cambridge-based landscape architecture firm Klopfer Martin Design Group (KMDG) has been selected by the Boston Redevelopment Authority to design the streetscape plan for Boston’s Downtown Crossing Business Improvement District (BID). In response to an RFP to design the Streetscape Design Standards & Wayfaring Program, BRA received 11 proposals and decided to move forward with KMDG’s program. The long-term plan will consist of recommendations for sidewalk and roadway materials, a pedestrian zone, and vending and wayfinding programs. In its proposal, KMDG outlined its main objectives to “recast the crossing as a public, open space” and “connect the connections.”  According to the BRA, construction is slated to be completed in late May.

More images after the jump.

A Pictorial Description of Broadway in 1899

Thursday, March 3, 2011
Broadway, East Side. Wall to Liberty St. (Courtesy NYPL)

Broadway, East Side. Wall to Liberty St. (Courtesy NYPL)

Last week, we came across illustrator James Gilliver Hancock’s series of playful block elevations titled “All the Buildings in New York.” It turns out this impulse to sketch block upon block of New York’s architecture has been around for quite some time. In 1899, the Mail & Express newspaper company published a graphic journey down Manhattan’s Broadway in a book called A Pictorial description of Broadway now archived at the New York Public Library.

The stroll down Broadway 112 years ago reveals just how much New York has evolved over the past century. As the NYPL says, “The result, as you can see here, is a 19th century version of Google’s Street View, allowing us to flip through the images block by block, passing parks, churches, novelty stores, furriers, glaziers, and other businesses of the city’s past.”

Check out some of our favorite blocks after the jump.

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