Lunch at a Landmark: Norman Foster explains the creative process behind his iconic structures

The Millennium Bridge in London

The Millennium Bridge in London. (Dark Dwarf)

On October 7, the New York Landmarks Preservation Foundation hosted its annual “Lunch at a Landmark” at the top of the Hearst Tower. Guests, New York’s elite architectural, design, and preservation cognoscenti, were offered a rare insight into the building—one from Norman Foster himself.

Continue after the jump.

Zaha 2, World 0: BBC apologizes to the starchitect about migrant worker death questions


(Courtesy Federico Babina)

After a few weeks of suffering the slings and arrows that occasionally punctuate the lives of starchitects, things are looking up for Zaha Hadid. First, the BBC issued a formal apology to her on behalf of one of its reporters, who implied that numerous construction workers on Hadid’s Al Wakrah soccer stadium project had suffered fatal accidents on site.

More after the jump.

Fly through Zaha Hadid’s sand dune-inspired headquarters with this flashy new video rendering

Screengrab from animation.

Screengrab from animation.

In December, we told you about Zaha Hadid‘s plan to build a sand-dune inspired, net-zero, headquarters in the United Arab Emirates for Bee’ah, a waste management company based in the Middle East. Now there’s more.

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Everyone thinks Frank Gehry’s new building in Australia looks like a paper bag

(Flickr / Mal Booth)

Gehry’s latest. (Flickr / Mal Booth)

The most famous architect in the world agrees that his latest building kind of looks like a crumpled brown paper bag. But that’s not necessarily a bad thing, said Frank Gehry, the creator of the very wavy, very paper bag-y Dr. Chau Chak Wing Building at the University of Technology, Sydney. “It is a container, maybe it is a brown paper bag,” said the starchitect at the building’s recent opening. “But it is flexible on the inside; there is a lot of room for change and movement which I think in the world today is essential.”

Continue reading after the jump.

December’s Top Five: Here’s what you read most on the AN Blog

Santiago Calatrava's transit center in New York City. (Courtesy Port Authority)

Santiago Calatrava’s transit center in New York City. (Courtesy Port Authority)

With 2014 quickly receding into history, here’s a look at what blog posts AN‘s readers clicked on most last month. Big international stories, many with starchitects attached, abounded in New York, London, Los Angeles, Helsinki, and Rio de Janeiro. All of December’s top stories point toward the future, with many under-construction projects that will be sure to dominate additional headlines this year. Here’s a glimpse at what was in the news.

View the top 5 after the jump.

Zaha Hadid’s first Brazilian project ups the level of luxury on Rio’s beachfront

Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects

Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects

Zaha Hadid will lend her futuristic style to the strip along the Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro, with an 11-story luxury condo building, dubbed Casa Atlântica—the first project in Brazil for the London-based architect. Newly released renderings show a soaring, spine-shaped facade reaching up to roughly 136 feet, abutting two other high-rises.

Continue reading after the jump.

Video> Frank Gehry on his eccentric Guggenheim Abu Dhabi museum

Gehry and his Guggenheim model. (Screengrab via NYTimes)

Gehry and his Guggenheim Abu Dhabi model. (Screengrab via the New York Times)

Up-and-coming architect Frank Gehry recently sat down with the New York Times to discuss his  Guggenheim museum under construction on Saadiyat Island near Abu Dhabi. The eccentric or idiosyncratic or whimsical structure totals 450,000 square feet, making it 12 times larger than the Guggenheim in New York. The Guggenheim Abu Dhabi  is defined by multiple cones that Gehry says were influenced by teepees because of how they remove hot air. The design is also supposed to evoke the domes of mosques around the Middle East. Although that’s a bit harder to discern.

Watch the video interview after the jump.

On View> Drawings by Hadid, Tschumi, Gehry, Libeskind, and Koolhaas are being exhibited right now in St. Louis

Architecture, Art, Midwest, On View
Thursday, December 11, 2014
(Courtesy Kemper Art Museum)

A drawing by Zaha Hadid is part of the exhibition. (Courtesy Kemper Art Museum)

Drawing Ambience: Alvin Boyarsky and the Architectural Association
Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum
Washington University in St. Louis
1 Brookings Dr, St Louis, MO
Through January 4th

The Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum in St. Louis is currently exhibiting early drawings from some of the world’s leading architects including Zaha Hadid, Bernard Tschumi, Frank Gehry, Daniel Libeskind, and Rem Koolhaas. The works come from the private collection of the late Alvin Boyarsky who chaired the Architectural Association School of Architecture (AA) in London from 1971 to 1990.

More info after the jump.

Eavesdrop> Muckraking Architecture Critics!

Zaha Hadid. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

Zaha Hadid. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

Zaha Hadid has sued the New York Review of Books. The complaint, filed last month in Manhattan Supreme Court, takes issue with a piece by architecture critic Martin Filler that allegedly mischaracterized her comments on the deaths of hundreds of migrant construction workers in Qatar, where she has designed a soccer stadium for the 2022 World Cup.

Continue reading after the jump.

Eavesdrop> Are We Done with Architecture Petitions Yet? Zaha Hadid Faces Tokyo Backlash

Speaking of controversy, Zaha Hadid can’t catch a break! Since her stadium design for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics was unveiled, complaints have arisen about the scale and height of the project. Then two of Japan’s biggest architects—Toyo Ito and Fumihiko Maki—signed on to a petition calling for a revised design. As of press time more than 26,500 people have signed on to protest the design. Is someone’s star beginning to dim?

Artist Paul Tuller Gives Starchitects the Royal Treatment with “Architecture As Crown” Series

(Courtesy Paul Tuller)

(Courtesy Paul Tuller)

Brooklyn-based illustrator Paul Tuller was inspired to create a new poster-portrait series, Architecture As Crown, by his architect boyfriend. This series features illustrations of famous architect’s wearing their most famous works on their heads. Beginning as a parody of Andy Warhol‘s God Save the Queen, the project includes such figures as Peter Eisenman wearing House I as a crown. Purchase your own posters here.

View the starchitects in hats after the jump.

Koolhaas Flag Inspires Designer Skateboard Deck Pattern

Design, International, Newsletter
Wednesday, December 11, 2013
(Courtesy Dufarge x OMA)

(Courtesy Dufarge x OMA)

Since 2011, skateboarders from all over Europe have flocked to a large concrete slab in OMA’s Museum Park in the city center of Rotterdam as a local spot for tricks and meetups. Nicknamed “Rem’s Flag,” the spot is painted with a massive 492-foot version of the EU Barcode, a multi-colored barcode design by architect Rem Koolhaas, conceived as an equal display of the flags of the European Union. Various objects have been “barcoded” with the Koolhaas flag. The most recent is a set of 80 limited edition skateboard decks, a collaboration between surf-inspired skateboard brand Dufarge and AMO, an OMA think tank, in honor of the Rem’s Flag skating experience.

View the Gallery After the Jump.

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