St. Louis Exhibition Explores Street Design in Grand Center Arts District

(Great Streets Project: Grand Center)

(Great Streets Project: Grand Center)

St. Louis’ Grand Center neighborhood has gone through a lot of changes. Though it was hit hard by suburban flight during the 1950s, in recent years the historic and predominantly African-American community area has enjoyed an artistic revival bolstered by theaters and cultural institutions like the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts.

Now a confluence of development corporations and nonprofits want the midtown neighborhood “to become the premiere cultural and entertainment tourist destination in the Midwest.” Read More

Friday> Freecell & Pulitzer Foundation turn a vacant lot in St. Louis into a parade of public programs

Conceptual rendering of Lots at the PXSTL site  Image. (Freecell Architecture via Pulitzer Foundation)

Conceptual rendering of Lots at the PXSTL site. (Freecell Architecture via Pulitzer Foundation)

Last year, a vacant lot across the street from the Pulitzer Foundation in St. Louis became the site of a design competition for a temporary built-environment installation. New York’s Freecell Architecture won PXSTL’s $50,000 project budget and $10,000 honorarium for a proposal to erect an adjustable canopy for performances and gatherings—an idea Kristina Van Dyke, director of the Pulitzer Foundation, called “both monumental and ephemeral at the same time.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Letter to the Editor> Let There Be Light

The site could become part of the Grand Center arts and culture district. (Courtesy Gluckman Mayner)

The site could become part of the Grand Center arts and culture district. (Courtesy Gluckman Mayner)

[Editor’s Note: The following are reader-submitted comments in response to the article “Born Again” (AN 02_02.19.2014_MW). Opinions expressed in letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions or sentiments of the newspaper. AN welcomes reader letters, which could appear in our regional print editions. To share your opinion, please email editor@archpaper.com. ]

This reminds me quite a bit of the never-built proposal, Bombed Churches as War Memorials (1945), published in London after WWII, which presented various designs for bombed-out churches to be preserved in ruined form with the addition of garden plantings and a few amenities.

Continue reading after the jump.

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On View> “On the Thresholds of Space-Making” at Washington University in St. Louis

Midwest, On View
Thursday, March 27, 2014
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Shinohara Kazuo, Great room (hiroma), House in White, Suginami Ward, Tokyo, 1964‐66. (Murai Osamu / Courtesy Tokyo Institute of Technology)

Shinohara Kazuo, Great room (hiroma), House in White, Suginami Ward, Tokyo, 1964‐66. (Murai Osamu / Courtesy Tokyo Institute of Technology)

On the Thresholds of Space-Making
Sam Fox School, Washington University
One Brookings Drive
St. Louis, Missouri
Through April 20

The work of Shinohara Kazuo (1925–2006), one of Japan’s most influential architects of the postwar generation, is surveyed in On the Thresholds of Space-Making. Shinohara gained popularity as an architect with his series of sublime purist houses designed over a thirty-year period that went through the 1980s. Shinohara scrutinized and reframed fundamental architectural conventions, such as public/private, body/space, and openness/enclosure.

Read More

Ten Roads Whose Time Has Come: Congress for the New Urbanism Releases List of Freeways Ripe for Removal

highways_to_boulevards_2

Detroit's I-375 made the list.

Detroit’s I-375 made the list. (gab482/flickr)

The Congress for the New Urbanism has released their annual list of Freeways Without Futures. The organization selected the top 10 urban American (and one Canadian) highways most in need of removal. The final list was culled from nominations from more than 50 cities. Criteria for inclusion included age of the freeway, the potential that removal would have to positively effect the areas where the roadways are currently situated, and the amount of momentum to realize such removals. Additionally the CNU highlighted campaigns in Dallas, the Bronx, Pasadena, Buffalo, and Niagra Falls, that are taking significant steps towards removing freeways (some of which have been included in past lists) as illustrations of broader institutional and political shifts on urban infrastructural thinking.

The dubious list after the jump.

“Sculpture City” Invites Dialogue On Public Art in St. Louis

Midwest
Tuesday, February 18, 2014
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St. Louis' Gateway Arch under construction. (Courtesy Missouri State Archives)

St. Louis’ Gateway Arch under construction. (Courtesy Missouri State Archives)

It’s open season for public art in St. Louis, according to the groups behind Sculpture City St. Louis 2014—an ongoing festival “intended to draw attention to the rich presence sculpture has in the visual landscape of our region.” The programming leads up to and continues after an April conference.

Art exhibitions throughout the year aim to continue the conversation. For instance, Art of Its Own Making, a show at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts that features sculpture, installation, film, and performance works through August 20.

Read More

On View> “Takeshi Murata: Melter 2″ at the Contemporary Art Museum of St. Louis

Art, Midwest, On View
Tuesday, February 4, 2014
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(Courtesy Contemporary Art Museum of St. Louis)

(Courtesy Contemporary Art Museum of St. Louis)

Takeshi Murata: Melter 2
Contemporary Art Museum of St. Louis
3750 Washington Road, Saint Louis, MO
Through April 27

New York–based artist Takeshi Murata will be transforming the facade of the Contemporary Art Museum of St. Louis through the installation of Melter 2. Created in 2003, the playful piece of video is being enlarged from its original form in order to fit the museum’s 62-by-18-foot metal facade. Melter 2 is reflective of the vibrant and psychedelic animations that have formed a major component of Murata’s practice. Its colorful floral forms that seem to melt and fuse over the course of the video will be visible once night falls through April 27. The work is the second in the museum’s ongoing series of expansive video-art installations, Street Views.

St. Louis Architect Wants Public Art for Public Health

Midwest
Tuesday, December 3, 2013
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The "Space-Time Transformation Footbridge"  is coated with a photovoltaic film to generate electricity to power shape changes and light the bridge at night. (Michael Jantzen)

The “Space-Time Transformation Footbridge” is coated with a photovoltaic film to generate electricity to power shape changes and light the bridge at night. (Michael Jantzen)

One St. Louis architect thinks his city’s public art needs a shot in the arm. Michael Jantzen says public art should further public health, and his work—interactive designs replete with solar film and meant to encourage exercise—shows how.

Continue reading after the jump.

Video> Jennifer Steinkamp Turns the St. Louis Contemporary Art Museum Inside Out

Midwest
Tuesday, November 12, 2013
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(Jennifer Steinkamp)

(Jennifer Steinkamp)

Digital artist Jennifer Steinkamp’s first installation in a series at St. Louis’ Contemporary Art Museum is up and running, transforming the museum’s facade into a projection screen for large-scale video art. Steinkamp’s installation, Orbit, features trees, vines, and other plants whipped up by turbulent windAN brought you images from the work back in October, but take a look at the newest video of the project below.

Watch the video after the jump.

On View> Jennifer Steinkamp Turns the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis Inside Out

Midwest, On View
Tuesday, October 15, 2013
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(Jennifer Steinkamp)

(Jennifer Steinkamp)

Jennifer Steinkamp: Street Views
Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis
3750 Washington Blvd, St. Louis, MO
Through December 23

The Contemporary Art Museum of St. Louis has inaugurated Street Views, an exhibition featuring a series of works by digital installation media artist Jennifer Steinkamp. As part of the 10th anniversary of CAM’s building, the museum will be turned inside out, as its exterior will be transformed into a gallery with large-scale video art being projected onto its facade.

Continue reading after the jump.

St. Louis Plan Calls for Form-Based Code to Push Transit-Oriented Development

Midwest
Monday, September 16, 2013
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stl-tod-01

For nextSTL, Richard Bose takes a close look at what’s next for St. Louis’ transit-oriented neighborhood. The Skinker-DeBaliviere neighborhood and the area near the Delmar and Forest Park MetroLink stations (both Red and Blue lines) have six bus routes. They’re near the forthcoming Loop Trolley line. A Department of Housing and Urban Development–funded sustainability plan, called OneSTL is examining opportunities for transit-oriented development near MetroLink stops.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> “Thomas Bayrle: Chrysler Tapete” Opens September 6 at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis

Midwest
Thursday, September 5, 2013
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(Courtesy Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis)

(Courtesy Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis)

Thomas Bayrle: Chrysler Tapete
Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis
3750 Washington Blvd, St. Louis, MO
September 6, 2013 to October 27, 2013

From September 6 to October 27, the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis and chief curator Dominic Molon present Chrysler Tapete (1970) as part of the institution’s ongoing Front Room program. One of a series of wallpaper works that German artist Thomas Bayrle has produced since the late 1960s, Chrysler Tapete features the repeated image of an automobile until its distinctiveness subsides into a colossal collectiveness. The purpose is to signify the tension between positive, shared experiences and the feeling of oppressive uniformity. Bayrle, a leader in European Pop Art—frequently referred to as Grey Pop—continues to experiment with painting, sculpture, fashion, and graphic design and currently lives and works in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. Through solo and group exhibitions, his objective is to uncover how our society of mass production and consumption influences our understanding of the world. Bayrle investigates how physical space, scale, and pattern influence the observer. Chrysler Tapete, consisting of silkscreen print on paper, has an intense visual presence that provides visitors with a new way to experience the exhibition space itself, a fitting role as the installation coincides with the tenth anniversary of the Contemporary Art Museum’s building.

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