San Francisco legislator proposes solar panels and green roofs for all new buildings

Sustainability, Urbanism, West
Thursday, October 23, 2014
.
David Chiu Announces his Solar Vision 2020 initiative next to SF City Hall (David Chiu)

David Chiu announces his Solar Vision 2020 initiative in front of SF City Hall (David Chiu)

According to the San Francisco Chronicle, David Chiu, president of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, is proposing legislation to mandate that all new buildings in the city contain solar panels, rooftop gardens, or both. The resolution, called Solar Vision 2020, would form a permanent program (extending the work of the pilot GoSolarSF) to help building owners pay to install solar arrays, set a goal of doubling the city’s solar energy production, and install 2 megawatts–worth of panels on residences citywide each year.

Continue reading after the jump.

Mayor de Blasio announces $28 million plan to install solar panels on New York City schools

East, Sustainability, Technology
Tuesday, September 30, 2014
.
Mayor de Blasio looking at solar panels in the Bronx. (Twitter/billdeblasio)

Mayor de Blasio looking at solar panels in the Bronx. (Twitter/billdeblasio)

Last week, Mayor Bill de Blasio unveiled his plan to reduce New York City’s greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent over 2005 levels by 2050. Needless to say, that’s a pretty ambitious target, but this mayor seems to like ambitious targets—his plan to build or preserve 200,000 units of affordable housing over the next decade comes to mind. But back to his latest plan, the climate plan.

Continue reading after the jump.

Fiber Dome Glows in Response to CO2 Levels in Saginaw, Michigan

Midwest, Newsletter
Tuesday, October 8, 2013
.
sol dome in Saginaw, Mich. (loop.ph)

sol dome in Saginaw, Mich. (loop.ph)

A web-like dome in Saginaw, Michigan changes colors to reflect the level of carbon dioxide in the air. Solar-powered LED lights connected to an onsite CO2 monitor illuminate the structure’s fibers in timed patterns to create the appearance of an organic response.

Continue reading after the jump.

Lancaster, California Going For Solar Gold

West
Tuesday, April 23, 2013
.
Solar panels on a house in Lancaster, California. (Thomas Hart / Flickr)

Solar panels on a house in Lancaster, California. (Thomas Hart / Flickr)

The high desert town of Lancaster, California, population 156,000, has set its sights on becoming, in the words of its mayor  R. Rex Parris “the solar capital of the world.” That means producing more electricity from solar energy than it consumes, which it would have to achieve by covering roofs, fields, and parking lots with enough solar panels to generate more than 200 megawatts citywide. The city, located about two hours north of Los Angeles in the Antelope Valley, already has about 40 megawatts built and 50 megawatts under construction, according to the New York Times; a combination of private investment and construction from the municipal utility.

Lancaster could prove to be a good case study: getting a solar permit in the sun soaked town is already much easier than anywhere in California—the number of residential solar installations have tripled in the last 18 months—and Parris is touting the initiative as an effective way to add jobs to the struggling area.

Giant Solar Array at Occidental College Wows Los Angeles

West
Wednesday, April 10, 2013
.
Oxy Solar Array (Sam Lubell/ AN)

Oxy Solar Array. (Sam Lubell/ AN)

At a DeLab (Design East of La Brea) Tour this Saturday, Los Angeles-based firm Lettuce Office shared the epic story of its new solar array for LA’s Occidental College. The 1 megawatt installation, made up of 4,886-panels, follows the contours of its hilly site, with its angled panels raised just two or three feet off the ground. To guard against sliding, each set of panels had to be imbedded into the earth via concrete-supported columns.

Continue reading after the jump.

Fabricating New Solar Skins

Fabrikator
Friday, May 11, 2012
.
Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator Brought to you by:

A rendering of Martin Ferrero's new BIPV concept

Research into flexible active skins opens up new BIPV possibilities

As building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) technology becomes more advanced, architects are getting involved in how new systems affect not only a building’s performance, but also its appearance. “The photovoltaic industry was until now largely developed by engineers,” said Daniel Martín Ferrero, a Madrid-based architect researching solar design. “The architect must enter the industry to develop their integration into the urban scene.” Ferrero has launched a new company named The New Solar Architecture with a goal of bringing a higher level of design to solar energy-producing facades.

Watch a video of the system

Go West, Solar Decathalon: DOE Selects New SoCal Venue for 2013

National, Newsletter
Thursday, January 26, 2012
.
The North Lawn at the Orange County Great Park. (Courtesy Orange County Great Park)

The North Lawn at the Orange County Great Park. (Courtesy Orange County Great Park)

We’ve known since early last year that the Solar Decathlon, the biennial event showcasing the best in energy producing, student-designed houses, was no longer welcome on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. due to concerns over wear and tear on the “nation’s front yard.” The 2011 Decathlon, won by the University of Maryland, was pushed to a far corner of the Mall between the Tidal Basin and the Potomac River midway through the design process, causing outcry from student teams who were finalizing their house designs. Officials later announced that future Decathlons might leave D.C. entirely, and today, Department of Energy Secretary Stephen Chu confirmed that it will be moving about as far away from the Mall as possible—to the Orange County Great Park in Irvine, California between Los Angeles and San Diego.

Continue reading after the jump.

OXY Goes Solar.  OXY Goes Solar President Obama’s Alma Mater Occidental College is finishing up work on a $6.8 million, 1-megawatt ground-mounted solar array. When finished this spring it will be one of the largest ground-mounted arrays in Los Angeles, generating about 11 percent of the College’s annual electrical usage. Led by physics professor Daniel Snowden-Ifft, the array’s 4,886 panels will be mounted on top of shade structures in a campus parking lot and on a nearby hillside.

 

Scarpa is King of the World (Updated!)

West
Monday, February 7, 2011
.
Colorado Court (Courtesy Brooks & Scarpa)

Colorado Court (Courtesy Brooks & Scarpa)

[ Updated 02.08.2011: Added the interview video, a gallery of Scarpa’s 502 Colorado project, and more. ]

You know you’ve hit the big time when you’re not only invited to appear on Oprah, but you’re interviewed by Leonard DiCaprio on Oprah. Such is the case with Larry Scarpa, of Santa Monica firm Brooks + Scarpa, who talked to Leo about his former firm Pugh + Scarpa’s  502 Colorado in Santa Monica, which DiCaprio calls the “first green affordable housing project in the country.”

Click through to watch the interview, see the project, and more!

Quick Clicks> Winded, Juiced, Stripped, TOD-IMBY

Daily Clicks
Monday, February 7, 2011
.
Rendering of an Italian viaduct with wind turbines (Via Popular Science)

Rendering of an Italian viaduct with wind turbines (Via Popular Science)

Winded. Popular Science has the story of a bridge concept in Italy called Solar Wind featuring an array of wind turbines capable of generating 40 million kilowatt hours annually. If that weren’t enough, the proposal also incorporates a solar roadway for an added green boost.

Juiced. The Times of Trenton reports that Princeton University is converting 27 acres in West Windsor, New Jersey into a field 16,500 photovoltaic panels able to generate 8 million kilo-watt hours of clean, green energy every year. The project will begin in 2012 and is expected to generate 5.5% of electricity for the university.

Stripped. Citiwire considers the downfall of the suburban commercial strip and it doesn’t look good for sprawl. As shopping trends evolve and consumer taste retreats from the generic strip landscape, hybrid shopping centers resembling main streets could be the future.

TOD or not TOD. Residents of an award-winning transit-oriented development in Maryland featuring a wide median where a light rail line was planned have turned their backs to their neighborhoods original lofty goals. StreetsBlog sums up the latest high-profile case of NIMBY-ism.

Quick Clicks> Cycle, East, Out, Opposites

Daily Clicks
Friday, February 4, 2011
.

Solar Cycle. The Dutch dream up a ways to capture latent energy beneath bike tires.

Go East Young Man. With the economy in the States still somewhat sour, the good news for West Coast firms is in the East, the Far East, writes AOL’s Daily Finance.  AIA’s Scott Frank spills the goods for Danny King.

Walled Out. It was hard to miss the spirited crowd on Chambers Street yesterday as three City Council committees held a joint hearing on Wal-Mart’s proposed move into New York  held. Wal-Mart was a no show. The line to get in stretched down the block. And Council Speaker Quinn blasted away. Today’s Daily News editorial found the whole drama, well, dramatic.

Polar Opposites. Ben Thompson and Paul Rudolph were cut from the same Modernist cloth, under the influence of Gropius, but the two took different paths. One was from the north the other from the south, one standoffish, the other a team player. One a sculpture, the other an entertainer. In Architecture Boston, David N. Fixler explores how their forms function.

The Green Building′s Platinum Lining

Midwest
Monday, December 20, 2010
.
An interior view of The Green Building’s street-facing café. (Ted Wathen/Quadrant)

An interior view of The Green Building’s street-facing café. (Ted Wathen/Quadrant)

Since opening in 2008, The Green Building in Louisville, Kentucky has been quietly awaiting the verdict on just how sustainable the three-story adaptive reuse project really is. As expected, the 115-year-old former dry goods store designed by California-based (fer) studio announced that the project received LEED Platinum certification, becoming the city’s first Platinum building.

Find out just how green platinum can be and see a slideshow after the jump!

Page 1 of 212

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License