Shigeru Ban to use rubble from Nepal’s earthquake to build housing shelters

(Courtesy Shigeru Ban)

(Courtesy Shigeru Ban)

In the immediate aftermath of the 7.3-magnitude earthquake that devastated Nepal, Shigeru Ban did what he does after so many natural disasters and conflicts: He offered to help. Ban announced that his Voluntary Architects’ Network (VAN) would immediately get to work distributing tents to be used for homes and medical centers. As the situation on the ground stabilized, VAN would transition to building homes and community facilities.

Continue reading after the jump.

Shigeru Ban to help relief efforts in Nepal

Ban's refugee camps in Rwanda. (Courtesy Shigeru Ban Architects/ NGO Voluntary Architects’ Network)

Ban’s refugee camps in Rwanda. (Courtesy Shigeru Ban Architects/ NGO Voluntary Architects’ Network)

Shigeru Ban, the Pritzker Prize laureate known for his humanitarian work, is lending his design talents to earthquake-ravaged Nepal. Ban’s Voluntary Architects’ Network (VAN) will start by distributing tents that can serve as shelter and medical stations.

More after the jump.

On View> Shigeru Ban’s humanitarian architecture highlighted by the Dallas Center for Architecture

Architecture, On View, Southwest
Thursday, March 12, 2015
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Cardboard Cathedral, Christchurch, New Zealand, 2013. (Bridgit Anderson)

Cardboard Cathedral, Christchurch, New Zealand, 2013. (Bridgit Anderson)

Shigeru Ban: Humanitarian Architecture
Dallas Center for Architecture
1909 Woodall Rodgers Freeway
Dallas, Texas
Through April 25

The Dallas Center for Architecture is presenting a selection of Pritzker Prize winning architect Shigeru Ban’s disaster relief designs. Ban’s humanitarian architecture has confronted some of the world’s most devastating natural and manmade cataclysms in the last 20 years. The Japanese architect is known for his pioneering designs for United Nations refugee shelters in the mid-1990s, using inexpensive and often recycled materials such as paper tubes and cardboard to make durable, shock-proof structures.

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Letter to the Editor> Ban Bang: A reader responds to Shigeru Ban’s Aspen Art Museum

(Michael Moran)

(Michael Moran)

[ Editor’s Note: The following reader-submitted letter was left on archpaper.com in response to our critique of Shigeru Ban’s Aspen Art Museum (AN 05_10.15.2014_SW). Opinions expressed in letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions or sentiments of the newspaper. AN welcomes reader letters, which could appear in our regional print editions. To share your opinion, please email editor@archpaper.com]

Deja vu all over again. Your article is a thoughtful critical review. I add a few observations.

Continue reading after the jump.

Shigeru Ban-Designed Aspen Art Museum Opens With A Bang, Literally

Architecture, Art, Newsletter, Southwest
Wednesday, August 6, 2014
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Workers were still putting the finishing touches on the building when it opened to members and the press. (Courtesy AAM)

Workers were still putting the finishing touches on the building when it opened to members and the press on Saturday, August 2. (Courtesy AAM/David X Prutting)

On Saturday, August 2, I had the opportunity to attend the ribbon cutting ceremony and member’s opening of the new Aspen Art Museum (AAM), designed by this year’s Pritzker Prize winner, Shigeru Ban. The event took place at the tail end of AAM’s annual ArtCrush festival, which gathers artists, art collectors, curators, gallery owners, celebrities, and philanthropists from around the world to celebrate contemporary art and raise money for the museum through an auction.

Continue reading after the jump.

Q&A> Shigeru Ban, The 2014 Pritzker Prize Laureate

International, News, Newsletter
Monday, March 24, 2014
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Cardboard Cathedral. (Stephen Goodenough)

Cardboard Cathedral. (Stephen Goodenough)

The Pritzker Architecture Prize has named Shigeru Ban its 2014 laureate. AN executive editor Alan G. Brake sat down with Ban at the Metal Shutter Houses, a luxury apartment building he designed in Manhattan’s Chelsea gallery district. He discussed influences from California to Finland, the social role of architecture, and what the recognition means for his work.

As a former Pritzker juror did you ever expect to be in the position of being a laureate yourself?
Not this soon. Also I know I have not made such achievements yet compared to other laureates, so I was not expecting it at all.

Continue reading after the jump.

Shigeru Ban’s Mt. Fuji Visitors Center Flips the Mountain Upside Down

Fujisan

(Courtesy Shigeru Ban Architects)

In the summer of 2013, Mt. Fuji was named a UNESCO World Heritage site. The designation was of the cultural rather than the natural variety, in part because of the way the mountain has “inspired artists and poets.” Japanese architect Shigeru Ban plans to add a quite literal architectural chapter to this legacy of inspiration in the form of a visitor center commemorating the mountain’s recently-minted status.

More after the jump.

Shigeru Ban’s Aspen Art Museum Set To Open This Summer

Newsletter, Southwest
Wednesday, February 26, 2014
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Rendering of Aspen Art Museum. (Shigeru Ban Architects)

Rendering of Aspen Art Museum. (Shigeru Ban Architects)

For those traveling the architecture/museum circuit, one of the next important excursions is definitely Shigeru Ban‘s Aspen Art Museum, which will open in August. Located in the city’s downtown core, this will be Ban’s first U.S. Museum. The building’s gridded composite facade allows for open views inside, inviting people inside and filling the interior (including 14-foot-tall galleries) with natural light. Inside a three-level grand staircase ascends past two ground floor galleries, sandwiched between the exterior grid and the interior structure. Art will be displayed here on mobile pedestals. Read More

Shigeru Ban’s Modern Penthouse Addition Unites Indoor and Outdoor Spaces in Manhattan

Architecture, East, Newsletter, Preservation
Thursday, January 23, 2014
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Ban addition archpaper1

(Renderings Courtesy Hayes Davidson)

Renderings for Shigeru Ban‘s rooftop addition to a landmark Tribeca building have been revealed. Newly recast as a luxury residential space, the 132-year old cast-iron building located at 67 Franklin Street at Broadway is set to receive a new metal-and-glass-clad cap. This twin duplex penthouse will be joined by a revamped interior also designed by the Japanese architect. The existing structure will be filled by 11 duplex apartments.

Continue reading after the jump.

Shigeru Ban Reinvents Earthquake-Damaged Christchurch With Temporary Cardboard Cathedral

Cardboard Cathedral, Exterior (Courtesy Shigeru Ban Architects)

Cardboard Cathedral, Exterior (Courtesy Shigeru Ban Architects)

As a result of a devastating earthquake in February 2011, New Zealand’s Christchurch Cathedral was left critically damaged. After an inconclusive debate about whether to completely tear down, restore, or remodel the original Neo-Gothic cathedral, the people of Christchurch were struck with what might be divine inspiration in the form of a temporary home, the world’s only cathedral constructed extensively of cardboard.  Tourism New Zealand announced the inauguration of Cardboard Cathedral, a replica of the original church constructed of cardboard tubes, timber joints, steel, and concrete.

Continue reading after the jump.

Students Help Shigeru Ban Build A Temporary Structure in Madrid

The latest Shigeru Ban paper tube building has opened at IE University in Madrid, Spain. Elsewhere, Ban built the paper tube Nomadic Museum in New York City on a Hudson River pier in 2007, a Camper retail store in New York’s Soho neighborhood, and now in Christchurch, New Zealand he is constructing an A-Frame cathedral out of the temporary, eminently efficient material. The Madrid University building took only two weeks to build, is based on sustainability objectives, and there was a requirement that it be a temporary construction. It is made of 173 paper tubes held together by timber joints that rest on paper columns.

Read More

QUICK CLICKS> Support, Prefab, Wright, Genius

Daily Clicks
Thursday, March 17, 2011
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Temporary housing designed by the office of Shigeru Ban.

Shigeru Ban‘s Tokyo office is developing temporary housing structures for those displaced by the natural disaster in Japan, reports Archinect; click here to help support the project. Stateside, AIA president Clark Manus issues a statement encouraging U.S. architects to do all they can to support Japanese recovery efforts.

The New York Times covers Forest City Ratner‘s plan to use prefab building components for a 34-story apartment building at Atlantic Yards in Brooklyn. Engineered by Arup and designed by SHoP, the units should be pretty high-end as far as modular housing goes, but construction workers argue that the prefab approach will mean less jobs.

The Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy trumpets the news that twelve of the master’s houses are currently on the market (starting at $800k for the Arnold and Lora Jackson House in Beaver Dam, WI), via Design Crave.

Acorn Media announces that the acclaimed BBC “Genius of Design” series is available on DVD. The five part documentary focuses on the highlights of industrial design throughout the twentieth century and beyond.

 

 

 

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