On View> 100 Years of Architecture Education at Yale

Architecture, East, On View
Wednesday, January 13, 2016
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Art and Architecture building 4th and 5th floor studios, 1963. (Courtesy Yale School of Architecture.)

Yale Art and Architecture building 4th and 5th floor studios, 1963. (Courtesy Yale School of Architecture)

Any fan of architecture is familiar with the rich history of the Yale School of Architecture (YSoA). If they aren’t they are likely familiar with some of the projects that have resulted from the school’s influential concrete halls. From Paul Rudolph’s heroic brutalism to Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown‘s “Learning From” series—and the productive friction between the two—the school has had an impact on much of the history of 20th and 21st century century architecture.

A new exhibition, “Pedagogy and Place,” organized by YSoA dean Robert A.M. Stern and curator (and AN contributor) Jimmy Stamp with Alfie Koetter, presents a range of student work that tracks the history of Yale architecture, and in parallel, the history of American architecture alongside political change in the U.S.

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See iconic architecture (for free!) at Open House New York Weekend

Architecture, East, News, On View
Thursday, October 15, 2015
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Stanford White's Gould Memorial Library and Hall of Fame (Courtesy Bronx Community College)

Stanford White’s Gould Memorial Library and Hall of Fame (Courtesy Bronx Community College)

This weekend, 256 public and privately-owned sites across New York City will open their doors to thousands of architecture and history nerds for the 13th annual Open House New York (OHNY) Weekend. All sites are free to visit, though some require registration in advance.

More info after the jump.

Archtober Building of the Day 3> North Hall and Library, Bronx Community College

Architecture, East
Saturday, October 3, 2015
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(Courtesy Benjamin Kracauer)

(Courtesy Benjamin Kracauer)

Archtober Building of the Day #3
North Hall and Library, Bronx Community College
Robert A.M. Stern Architects

Alex Lamis, FAIA, and Dennis Sagiev met a windblown gaggle of enthusiasts on the educational plateau of the Bronx: the former University Heights campus of NYU. Now Bronx Community College, it is a repository of ambitious plans. The first was the Jeffersonian campus plan of 1892 by Stanford White with its iconic Gould Memorial Library (1900) framed by the venerable Hall of Fame (1912). Marcel Breuer made his Modernist marks on the hilltop in 1956 and on into the 1960s.

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On Second Try, Robert Stern’s Proposal for Philly’s American Revolution Museum Approved

Development, East, Newsletter
Monday, April 7, 2014
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Stern's new plan for the museum. (Courtesy NC3D for Robert A.M. Stern Architects

Stern’s new plan for the museum. (Courtesy NC3D for Robert A.M. Stern Architects)

Weeks after the Philly Art Commission slammed Robert Stern’s proposal for the Museum for the American Revolution, he’s back with a new design. And good news for the starchitect—the commission likes it. They really, really like it. The Philadelphia Inquirer reported that the new plan was unanimously approved and building permits should be issued in the next few months. Unsurprisingly, Stern‘s altered design does not include the features, which the Commission called “Disneyesque.”

See the old design after the jump.

Philly Art Commission Pans Stern’s Revolution Museum Design as “Disneyesque”

Stern's Panned Proposal for The Museum of the American Revolution.  (Rendering NC3D.)

Stern’s Panned Proposal for The Museum of the American Revolution. (Rendering NC3D.)

Philadelphia might be the City of Brotherly Love, but it’s not showing any affection for Robert A.M. Stern these days. According to Philly.com, the city’s Art Commission is  “deeply dissatisfied” with the architect’s proposal for the new Museum of the American Revolution. The newspaper’s critic, Inga Saffron, reported that “the commission asked the architects to remove a Disneyesque cupola, add eye-level windows on Chestnut Street, and reconsider the building’s composition.” It’s not quite the shot heard around the world, but, “Disneyesque cupola!?” The Philly Art Commission pulls no punches.

Continue reading after the jump.

Penn-ultimate? Never! Norman Foster’s Superstitious Plans for Philly

East, Eavesdroplet
Thursday, February 6, 2014
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Rendering of Norman Foster's new skyscraper on the Philadelphia skyline. (Courtesy Foster + Partners)

Rendering of Norman Foster’s new skyscraper on the Philadelphia skyline. (Courtesy Foster + Partners)

In life, by all accounts, William Penn, founder of the Province of Pennsylvania, was a good man. In death, however, this portly, English-born idealist has turned nasty—if the good sports fans of Philadelphia are to be believed. But Norman Foster has a plan to appease the spirits.

Get the whole story after the jump.

Product> 2013 Architect’s Holiday Gift Guide

National, Newsletter, Product
Wednesday, December 11, 2013
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(Snowflake photos by Alexey Kljatov / Flickr; Montage by AN)

(Snowflake photos by Alexey Kljatov / Flickr; Montage by AN)

As architects, we know you’re overworked and probably underpaid, and we’re guessing you haven’t had time to draft your holiday wish list quite yet. But don’t despair. AN has compiled a list of high-design, unique gift ideas for you and your colleagues, friends, and family members with good taste, most of which are also attainable for budget-conscious buyers.

Continue reading after the jump.

Stalled Residential Tower in Lower Manhattan to Rise Next to Woolworth Building

East
Wednesday, May 15, 2013
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(Courtesy Silverstein Properties / Bing Maps)

(Courtesy Silverstein Properties / Bing Maps)

A giant residential skyscraper is slated to join Manhattan’s skyline— rising more than 130 feet above its neighbor, the Woolworth Building.  Developer Silverstein Properties announced today that $950 million in funding has been secured to move forward with the construction of the Robert A.M. Stern Architects-designed tower at 30 Park Place in Lower Manhattan.

Continue reading after the jump.

Product> Tread on Gehry, Zaha, Tigerman, and Friends

International
Friday, January 18, 2013
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Arabesque by Michael Graves.

Arabesque by Michael Graves.

ARZU STUDIO HOPE and live/work furniture company Coalesse have teamed up with six leading architects to design a series of bold rugs and also provide economic opportunities for Afghan women. Chicago-based ARZU first approached Stanley Tigerman and Margaret McCurry  to design a collection of contemporary rugs, the proceeds of which support hundreds of rural women and their families through economic activity, and educational and health services. Rug weaving, which takes place in private homes, is one of the few industries where women can work safely.

Continue reading after the jump.

Postmodernism Post-Denial

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, November 15, 2011
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Montage based on Stanley Tigerman's "Titanic" with Philip Johnson's AT&T Building and text drawn by Seth Weine/ICAA

Montage based on Stanley Tigerman's "Titanic" with Philip Johnson's AT&T Building and text drawn by Seth Weine/ICAA

Postmodernism, the exuberant, eclectic, and ironic style born out of the death of the modernist dream in the 1960s and 70s, was the subject of the two-day-long “Reconsidering Postmodernism” conference last weekend, presented by the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art, at the CUNY Graduate Center in New York. The two marathon days of lectures, panels, and videos was filled with the original rock stars of the postmodernist world, including architects Robert A. M. Stern and Michael Graves, theorists Charles Jencks and Tom Wolfe, urbanists Andres Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, and a small but passionate younger crowd who couldn’t help but revel in the rambunctiousness of their vaunted forebearers.

Continue reading after the jump.

Stern’s Revolution Museum Silences QEII Bell

East
Wednesday, November 9, 2011
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Queen Elizabeth outside at the dedication of the Bicentennial Bell in 1976.

Queen Elizabeth II at the dedication of the Bicentennial Bell in 1976. (Courtesy phillyhistory.org)

After rejecting two plans for the Museum of the American Revolution at Valley Forge, the American Revolution Center (ARC) made a land swap with the National Park Service to secure a prime location in Center City Philadelphia. In exchange for donating their 78-acre property at the Valley Forge site, the Park Service will give the museum nearly two-thirds of the space of the former National Park Visitors Center near Independence Mall on Third Street. ARC selected Robert A.M. Stern to design the $150 million building. Stern told ThePhiladelphia Inquirer he plans to use “the language of traditional Philadelphia architecture.” The 1970s era building designed by Cambridge Seven and its redbrick modernist bell tower holding the Bicentennial Bell, a gift to United States from Queen Elizabeth II, will be demolished, and critics worry the future of the bell itself is uncertain.

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Quick Clicks> Capping Highways, Flying Meteors, Infrastructure Pop, Old School Ivy

Daily Clicks
Thursday, May 26, 2011
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Proposed highway-straddling structure in Santa Monica. (Courtesy Curbed)

Proposed highway-straddling structure in Santa Monica. (Courtesy Curbed)

Capping Santa Monica. Curbed LA got some great renderings from students at USC who where charged with imagining even more highway caps for the Pacific Coast Highway, this time from Arizona to California Avenues. Beyond freeway parks, the students proposed housing, hotels, and community centers.

Breaking Whitney. With the deal signed for the Met to take over the Whitney‘s Breuer building on Madison, directors at the ground breaking for the new branch at the High Line had all the more reason to celebrate. DNA reminds readers that the museum is actually retuning home. Ol’ Gerty got the ball rolling on 8th Street way back in 1930.

Dylan Sings. Happy B-day Bobby! Bob Dylan turned 70 on Tuesday and in celebration the Infrastructurist presents Dylan’s Ten Best Infrastructure Songs, including “The Levee’s Gonna Break” and “Marchin’ to the City.”

Old School. Design New Haven has the Robert A.M. Stern drawings for “street calming measures” at Yale that are part of the $600 million for renovations, including two new residential colleges. The plan includes mixed use buildings intended to encourage street life at all hours and improved access to the Farmington Canal Greenway .

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