Qatari officials considering an underwater TV station, among other outlandish pitches, as its $200 billion 2022 World Cup approaches

(Courtesy Arabian Business)

(Courtesy Arabian Business)

Seven years away and already commanding a reported $200 billion budget in preparations, the FIFA World Cup 2022 has Qatari officials deliberating over proposals for an underwater TV station. Los Angeles–based artificial reef and aquarium design firm Reef Worlds is pushing designs for a $30 million underwater broadcast studio which, post–World Cup, will be turned into a public aquarium.

Continue reading after the jump.

West 8 unveils botanic garden in Doha, Qatar inspired by plants from the Qur’an

The Qur’anic Botanic Garden. (Courtesy West 8)

The Qur’anic Botanic Garden. (Courtesy West 8)

The Rotterdam and New York City–based West 8 has unveiled plans for a botanic garden in Doha, Qatar to feature plants mentioned in the Qur’an. According to the firm, the Qur’anic Botanic Garden project will break ground this year, roughly five years after the idea for the project was proposed by UNESCO.

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Zaha Hadid settles lawsuit, donates proceeds to laborers’ rights charity

Hadid's Al Wakrah Stadium. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

Hadid’s Al Wakrah Stadium. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

One of the biggest architectural head-to-head matches of 2014 has come to an amicable end. As AN reported last fall, Zaha Hadid sued New York Review of Books critic Martin Filler for defamation for comments he made about her in a review of Rowan Moore’s Why We Build: Power and Desire in Architecture.

Continue reading after the jump.

Eavesdrop> Muckraking Architecture Critics!

Zaha Hadid. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

Zaha Hadid. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

Zaha Hadid has sued the New York Review of Books. The complaint, filed last month in Manhattan Supreme Court, takes issue with a piece by architecture critic Martin Filler that allegedly mischaracterized her comments on the deaths of hundreds of migrant construction workers in Qatar, where she has designed a soccer stadium for the 2022 World Cup.

Continue reading after the jump.

Is That A Dhow In Your Pocket, Or Just Zaha Hadid’s Stadium Design For The Qatar World Cup?

International, Newsletter
Monday, November 18, 2013
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The design is allegedly based upon the Dhow, a type of Arabian sailing ship. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

The design is allegedly based upon the Dhow, a type of Arabian fishing boat. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

Zaha Hadid Architects has unveiled its design for a 40,000-seat soccer stadium to rise in the Arabian kingdom of Qatar. The project is slated to be complete in time for the 2022 FIFA World Cup, and is only one of several such facilities that the oil-rich nation plans to build—in addition to miles of roads, a seaport, airport, and a rail system—in a $140 billion spending spree to lay down the infrastructure necessary to support the event and the international crowds it attracts.

Hadid’s office has stated that the design of the stadium is derived from the dhow, a type of fishing vessel that is common among the peoples of the Arabian Peninsula. Several commentators have pointed out, however, that the renderings more closely resemble the mounds, folds, and cavities of a certain very private part of the female anatomy.

Continue reading after the jump.

Qatar To Host FIFA World Cup 2022 With Stadia by Zaha Hadid, Others

Architecture, International
Tuesday, October 8, 2013
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Zaha Hadid's planned stadium for Qatar's 2022 FIFA World Cup. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

Zaha Hadid’s planned stadium for Qatar’s 2022 FIFA World Cup. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

The Arab state of Qatar is in full swing with its plans to host the FIFA World Games 2022. Selected in 2010, it is the first time in the history of FIFA that a Middle Eastern Country has been chosen to host the tournament.

Three existing stadiums will be expanded and nine new ultra-modern stadiums will be built, including one designed by Zaha Hadid Architects. The stadiums will reach capacities from approximately 45,000 seats for the group matches, to more than 85,000 seats for the finals. The design vision involves keeping all the stadiums within a one hour drive from the FIFA headquarters, allowing fans to attend more than one game a day.

Continue reading after the jump.

19 Sites Inscribed to UNESCO World Heritage List

International, Preservation
Wednesday, July 17, 2013
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Wooden Tserkvas of the Carpathian Region in Poland and Ukraine (National Heritage Board of Poland)

Wooden Tserkvas of the Carpathian Region in Poland and Ukraine (National Heritage Board of Poland)

At its 37th session held from June 16 to 27, 2013 in Phnom Pehnh and Siem Reap-Angkor, Cambodia, the UNESCO World Heritage Committee added 19 sites to the World Heritage List. The new additions bring the list to 981 noteworthy destinations. To be included on the World Heritage List, sites must be of exceptional universal significance and satisfy at least one out of ten selection criteria, which are frequently improved by the Committee to reflect the advancement of the World Heritage notion itself.

The list of newly added sites after the jump.

Zaha Hadid Designs an Oasis-Inspired Stadium for the 2022 World Cup

(Zaha Hadid Architects)

(Zaha Hadid Architects)

Zaha Hadid is on a stadium kick of late. Work has already begun for the design of a 2022 FIFA World Cup Stadium to be built in Qatar by Zaha Hadid Architects and AECOM. The 45,000-seat stadium is meant to visually embody an oasis and will be built 12 miles southeast of capital-city, Doha.

Continue reading after the jump.

Rem Koolhaas To Design an Aerotropolis in Qatar

International
Monday, March 11, 2013
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(Courtesy OMA)

(Courtesy OMA)

OMA announced on Friday that it will design a master plan for Airport City, an ambitious 3.9-square-mile project that will link the new Hamad International Airport with Doha, Qatar. Recalling the ideas put forth last year by John D. Kasarda and Greg Lindsay in Aerotropolis: The Way We’ll Live Next, OMA’s enterprising piece of urbanism will incorporate four distinct districts along a green axis of public spaces parallel to the airport’s runways to create a functionally differentiated but continuous urban system. Residential, business, aviation, and logistics districts will be tied together in a new type of 21st century transit oriented development.

Continue reading after the jump.

Doha Tower named world’s best by Council on Tall Buildings

Doha Tower façade (Jean Nouvel)

Doha Tower façade (Jean Nouvel)

The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat held its 11th annual awards symposium Thursday, bestowing architect Helmut Jahn and structural engineers Charles Thornton and Richard Tomasetti with lifetime achievement recognition and awarding Doha Tower the title of 2012’s Best Tall Building.

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Wilson Savastano Venezia′s Dukhan facade: TAKTL

Fabrikator
Friday, April 29, 2011
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Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Fabrikator Brought to you by: 

Prototype of a perforated Dukhan facade panel (TAKTL)

High-performance concrete creates new possibilities for a community college facade.

A new generation of concrete, called Ultra High Performance Concrete (UHPC), is changing the way architects and designers think about the material. Usually composed of cement, fine grain sand, silica fume, optimized admixture, and alkali-resistant glass fiber reinforcement, UHPC offers high ductility, strength, and durability with a fine surface appearance. A new UHPC product called TAKTL, launched last year, shows the many additional applications that are possible with the right material mix, including facade panels available through its sister company VECTR. Recently chosen by Milan-based Wilson Savastano Venezia Architecture Studio for its Dukhan Community College (DCC) project in Qatar, the company is in the research and development phase for perforated and solid panels to clad the school’s sculptural facade.
Continue reading after the jump.

Quick Clicks> Clouds, Danger, DC, Rigor

Daily Clicks
Thursday, March 31, 2011
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Video screen capture of Qatar World Cup stadium's shading "cloud," via CNN.

BYO Cloud. Not since the Romans stretched the vela around the Coliseum has there been such a radical solution for stadium shading. Qatar plans to create man-made clouds (“a lightweight carbon structure carrying a giant envelope of material containing helium gas”) to float over the stadium where the World Cup will be held in the summer of 2022. More details in The Daily Mail.

Fatal attraction? Why do we live in dangerous places? Scientific American investigates their allure and the ecological consequences–good and bad–for both plant and animal life.

ESI 2 DC. The Washington Post reports that President Obama has tapped New York’s own Edwin Schlossberg, founder of the interactive design firm ESI, to serve on a federal panel that helps oversee the architecture and design of the nation’s capital. (Schlossberg is the more designer-y half of Caroline Kennedy and also one of the founders of the not-for-profit desigNYC.)

More rigor, less speed. At Slate, Witold Rybczynski makes the case for slow architecture: “No wonder that Renaissance architectural treatises often seem cerebral; architects spent a lot of time thinking before they started drawing.”

watch Qatar cloud video after the jump

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