Taipei activates space below a rail viaduct with 1,000 twinkling balloons

PROMENADE UNDER 220. (COURTESY CITY YEAST)

PROMENADE UNDER 220. (COURTESY CITY YEAST)

In November, Taipei was overtaken by a giant anemone lurking beneath a rail viaduct. One thousand six-foot-tall, cylindrical balloons wobbled under the city’s Shilin Metro Station. The 650-foot-long, inflatable, public art installation, Walking in the Balloons, was built for the Shilin Light Festival. City Yeast, a Taipei-based design firm, executed the project.

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SOFTlab’s “Nova” pavilion brightens cold New York nights with psychadelic light

City Terrain, East, News, Urbanism
Monday, November 23, 2015
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(Courtesy 3M)

(Courtesy 3M)

Suburban folk mark the change of seasons with spring peepers, the sound of leaf blowers, and first frosts. City dwellers rely on other environmental cures: pumpkin spice lattes, heat season, and festive public art installations. Last week, the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership Business Improvement District (BID) and the Van Alen Institute welcomed crowds to SOFTlab‘s Nova, the 2015 winner of the Flatiron Public Plaza Holiday Design Competition.

More after the jump.

Collective–LOK steals hearts to win 2016 Times Square Valentine Heart Design competition

Art, City Terrain, East, News, Urbanism
Thursday, November 12, 2015
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The winning design (Courtesy Collective-LOK)

The winning design (Courtesy Collective-LOK)

The Times Square Alliance takes “I ♥ New York” quite literally. For the past eight years, the nonprofit organization has invited architecture and design firms to create public art that responds to a Valentine’s Day theme. This year the Times Square Alliance partnered with the Center for Architecture to administer the competition. Collective-LOK stole the hearts of jurists to win the 2016 Times Square Valentine Heart Design competition.

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Pictorial> Take a look inside Dattner’s 34th St-Hudson Yards subway station, now open to the public

(Patrick Cashin for MTA / Flickr)

(Patrick Cashin for MTA / Flickr)

On Sunday, September 13th, New York City got its first new subway station in 25 years. Located at 34th Street and Eleventh Avenue, the 34th St-Hudson Yards station extended the 7 train one and a half miles to serve Manhattan’s Far West Side.

See inside the station after the jump.

Signs of life: Artist Steve Powers tacks thought-provoking ‘ICY Signs’ around New York City

(Courtesy New York City Department of Transportation)

(Courtesy New York City Department of Transportation)

Manhattan-based artist Steve Powers is offering a non-caffeinated pick-me-up for weary NYC commuters with his pop art–style street signs mounted on light poles around the city. Bearing food-for-thought slogans with themes of life and love against a pictograph or logotype, such as “I get lost to get found” stamped on a briefcase, the signs are designed to inspire smiles and/or introspection.

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These odd creatures and sculptures will soon fill Austin’s Circle Acres nature reserve

(Courtesy Field Constructs)

(Courtesy Field Constructs Design Competition)

The 18 winning projects shortlisted in the Field Constructs Design Competition flag a range of pressing socio-environmental issues through whimsical takes on interactive public art. The exhibits will occupy an old landfill and brownfield in Austin within the Circle Acres nature reserve, turning the site into a bizarre outdoor museum teeming with site-responsive sculptures and unforeseen creatures. Here, we take a look at some of the winning proposals to be displayed from November 14–22.

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Construction gone awry: crane driver accidentally extricates a house and causes car pile-up—or that’s what the artists will have you believe

Art, International, Newsletter
Tuesday, August 11, 2015
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(Courtesy of ZKM)

(Courtesy of ZKM)

A house “mistakenly” unearthed from the soil by an inebriated crane driver hangs mournfully over a construction site in Karlsruhe, southern Germany. Torn roots sprout from its base to remind onlookers that it was once a happy home before its violent extrication.

Continue reading after the jump.

Two Belgian architects create a steel-frame maze which viewers can look down on from an old mine shaft

(Gijs Van Vaerenbergh)

(Gijs Van Vaerenbergh)

Belgian architects Pieterjan Gijs and Arnout Van Vaerenbergh created a sculptural-spatial intervention on the grounds of the Genk’s C-mine Arts Center in Belgium, where viewers must navigate a geometric conundrum.

More after the jump.

An expanse of sustainable timber just clinched the Chicago Architecture Biennial’s Lakefront Kiosk Competition

Chicago Architecture Biennial officials today announced "Chicago Horizon" by Ultramoderne as the winner of the inaugural design festival's Lakefront Kiosk Competition. (Ultramoderne)

Chicago Architecture Biennial officials today announced “Chicago Horizon” by Ultramoderne as the winner of the inaugural design festival’s Lakefront Kiosk Competition. (Ultramoderne)

Officials with the Chicago Architecture Biennial today announced the winners of the Lakefront Kiosk Competition, choosing a team whose stated goal was “to build the largest flat wood roof possible.”

Continue reading after the jump.

This million dollar sculptural Ferris wheel at a Montreal bus stop is stirring questions about cost

(City of Montreal)

(City of Montreal)

A new bus stop in Montreal will include a 64-foot-tall, Ferris Wheel–shaped art installation that cost the city a cool $840,000. For blatantly obvious reasons, many Quebecois aren’t thrilled about that—in no small part because the expensive art project is in a part of Montreal that is struggling to combat poverty.

Continue reading after the jump.

In a commentary against waste-producing lifestyles, Indian artist creates a sculpture made from 70,000 bottle caps

(Courtesy Arunkumar HG)

(Courtesy Arunkumar HG)

Indian artist Arunkumar HG has created a somewhat tongue-in-cheek calling out of our throwaway, waste-producing lifestyles with a shoreline sculpture made from nearly 70,000 bottle screw caps. The artist amassed the collection from his neighborhood over the course of a year, carefully stacked the caps, and connected them in vertical configurations using steel filaments.

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Honoring the forgotten: Melbourne-based artist Robbie Rowlands makes Detroit’s abandoned houses come to life

(Courtesy Robbie Rowlands)

‘In Between’ (Courtesy Robbie Rowlands)

The deteriorating floorboards and walls of abandoned homes appear to defiantly reassert their existence in artist Robbie Rowlands’ exhibition, Intervention. While on residency in Detroit, Michigan, the Melbourne-based artist drew attention to abandoned houses by ripping out certain sections and creating track-like extensions of their fixtures—so that the otherwise nondescript wall seems to implore, “pay attention to me.”

Continue reading after the jump.

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