An expanse of sustainable timber just clinched the Chicago Architecture Biennial’s Lakefront Kiosk Competition

Chicago Architecture Biennial officials today announced "Chicago Horizon" by Ultramoderne as the winner of the inaugural design festival's Lakefront Kiosk Competition. (Ultramoderne)

Chicago Architecture Biennial officials today announced “Chicago Horizon” by Ultramoderne as the winner of the inaugural design festival’s Lakefront Kiosk Competition. (Ultramoderne)

Officials with the Chicago Architecture Biennial today announced the winners of the Lakefront Kiosk Competition, choosing a team whose stated goal was “to build the largest flat wood roof possible.”

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Urban culture ‘consulates’, Miami ‘science barge’ among winners of first Knight cities challenge

The Knight Foundation awarded, among many others, an idea for a network of new “consulates” initially located in Detroit, Philadelphia and New Orleans that will offer an entrée into local culture. (Claire Nelson)

The Knight Foundation awarded, among many others, an idea for a network of new “consulates” initially located in Detroit, Philadelphia and New Orleans that will offer an entrée into local culture. (Claire Nelson)

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation announced Tuesday the winners of the first Knight Cities Challenge, awarding a total of $5 million to 32 projects that include “consulates” for local culture in Detroit, Philadelphia, and New Orleans, and “a social kitchen” in downtown Gary, Indiana.

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Philadelphia packs its riverfront pop-up park, RiverRink Winterfest, with holiday cheer

Fire pits. (Courtesy Matt Stanley)

Fire pits. (Courtesy Matt Stanley)

Just a few months after Philadelphia’s hugely popular, but temporary, Spruce Street Harbor Park closed up shop, the Blue Cross RiverRink Winterfest has opened in its place. The new space, which is open until March 1st, was commissioned by the Delaware River Waterfront Corporation and designed by the New Jersey–based Groundswell Design Group, the same team behind the Winterfest’s summertime predecessor.

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Beer, Shakespeare, and hip hop take over a vacant lot in Downtown Louisville

ReSurfaced, a pop-up festival occupying a vacant lot in downtown Louisville. (Urban Design Studio)

ReSurfaced, a pop-up festival occupying a vacant lot in downtown Louisville. (Urban Design Studio via Flickr)

What can you do with a vacant lot? Urban activists in Louisville have set out to show just how much with an ongoing pop-up festival of sorts at 615-621 West Main Street, an empty plot of land in the heart of downtown where REX‘s Museum Plaza skyscraper was once set to rise.

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The Detroit Design Festival is on view through Sunday

Architecture, Art, On View
Thursday, September 25, 2014
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Detroit, on the water. (Image courtesy Bernt Rostad via Flickr.)

Detroit (Image courtesy Bernt Rostad via Flickr.)

The Detroit Design Festival is underway, featuring 30 design events and 500 designers through Sunday, September 28. Panel discussions, art installations and flash-mob style gatherings are all on the docket for the six-day festival, which is sponsored by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Read More

Chicago Placemaking Festival Aims to teach Old Places New Tricks

Art, City Terrain, Midwest, Urbanism
Friday, August 15, 2014
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(Metropolitan Planning Council)

(Metropolitan Planning Council)

In a few short years, the term placemaking has migrated from wonky urban planning circles to neighborhoods across the country—that communities come together around public space is no groundbreaking observation, but when successful the idea can be revolutionary on a local scale.

So hopes Chicago’s Metropolitan Planning Council, who this weekend will sponsor “Old Place New Tricks,” a bid to “activate” neighborhoods from Englewood to Ravenswood with public space interventions that range from a “healthy eating happy hour” to “Selfie Sunday.”

More info after the jump.

No more clowning around, team proposes a circus for architects

(The Spectacle Syndicate)

(The Spectacle Syndicate)

Circuses have been a historic gathering place in cities and towns across America. Crowds of people are attracted to the towering tent, local music, and fragrant carnival food. A group of five architects tap into this pop appeal with their project, Circus for Construction, which won a competition in May,2014 held by Storefront for Art & Architecture. Their plan retrofits a semi-truck to transform into a pop-up venue and experimental gallery space for architecture and art.

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Origami Architecture: Make’s Portable Pop-Up Kiosks Fold Metal Like Paper

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Make Architects' kiosks fold open and shut. (Courtesy Make Architects)

Make Architects’ kiosks fold open and shut. (Courtesy Make Architects)

Inspired by Japanese paper-folding, Canary Wharf booths make a sculptural statement whether open or shut.

Make Architects’ folding kiosks for Canary Wharf in London bring new meaning to the term “pop-up shop.” The bellows-like structures were inspired by Japanese paper folding. “[The kiosk] had to be solid, but lightweight, so then that led us to origami,” said Make lead project architect Sean Affleck. “[You] end up with something very flimsy; add a few folds and creases, and suddenly the strength appears. In the folds, the shape appears.”

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Out of Chaos, Japanese Designers Shape a Pop-Up Bar Made From Reed-Grass

Exterior view of Yoshi bar, courtesy Takeshi Asano

Exterior view of Yoshi bar, courtesy Takeshi Asano

Designer Naoya Matsumoto and her peers at Seian University of Art and Design have created a unique meeting space for students on the Japanese campus. Their creation, a pop-up bar, is created from six panels of locally-sourced reeds called Yoshi. The chaotic construction resembles a traditional gabled roof structure in abstract form. Each year, students of the design school are challenged to create objects from the Yoshi reeds which grow freely around Lake Biwa, an area close to the university campus.

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Arlington Looks to Build Community With New Pop-Up Park

East
Wednesday, August 14, 2013
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Clarendon & Barton Pop-Up Park, Site Analysis Diagram (Courtesy PeakDemocracy.com)

Clarendon & Barton Pop-Up Park, Site Analysis Diagram. (Courtesy PeakDemocracy.com)

The Embassy of the Republic of Korea (ROK) has donated two parcels of land in Arlington County, Virginia’s Courthouse area, and now the county is reaching out to the community for help in designing its first temporary pop-up park. The Departments of Parks and Recreation and Community Planning, Housing and Development have devised a survey to determine how the public would like to use the new open space on Clarendon Boulevard. Features already planned for the park include ADA accessible paths, an assortment of moveable seating, a modest grass area, and a landscaped barrier between the alleyway and open space.

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San Francisco’s Shipping Container Village Grows Up, Adds High-Style Retailer

West
Thursday, February 7, 2013
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Aether's jutting glass mezzanine. (Peter Prato)

Aether’s jutting glass mezzanine. (Peter Prato)

There’s a new couture addition to PROXY, the temporary shipping container village in San Francisco’s Hayes Valley, designed by architects Envelope A+D.  Adding to PROXY’s cool coffee shop, ice cream parlor, and Biergarten is a new store for clothing company Aether, made up of three forty foot shipping containers stacked atop one another, supported by steel columns.  The guts of the first two containers have been carved out, making a double story retail space, with a glass mezzanine above jutting to the side, providing display space and views. A third container for inventory storage is accessible via a custom-designed drycleaners’ conveyor belt spanning all three floors. Workers can literally load garments from the ground floor and send them up to the top.

Continue reading after the jump.

Boxman Studios Continues Push To Pop-Up Shipping Containers

National, Newsletter
Tuesday, February 5, 2013
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Google Village at TED Long Beach. (Courtesy Boxman Studios)

Google Village at TED Long Beach. (Courtesy Boxman Studios)

Boxman Studios, the company that pioneered the shipping-containers-turned-housing trend back in 2008, is now embarking on a whole new shipping container revolution. As part of their sustainable building efforts they are adapting decommissioned containers to enhance already complete buildings and even stand alone as pop-up shops, venues, restaurants, transit stations and more.

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