First in 40 Years: After initial rejection, Herzog & de Meuron’s triangular skyscraper is set to break ground in Paris

(Courtesy Tour Triangle)

(Courtesy Tour Triangle)

Paris’ city council ruling against the controversial Tour Triangle skyscraper back in 2014 was just overturned by the same governmental body. Mayor Anne Hidalgo approved of the jagged, triangular, Herzog & de Meuron–designed tower and has said she looks forward to the opportunities it will bring to the French capital.

Read More

See the Grand Palais submerged in a virtual waterfall in 3D projection mapping design by Japanese art collective teamLab

(Courtesy teamLab)

(Courtesy teamLab)

Recently, Paris’ Grand Palais was awash in the cascade of a virtual waterfall, transforming the beaux-arts palace into a captivating scene from the lost city of Atlantis. TeamLab, a Japanese collective of technologists and artists, used 3D projection mapping to create the holographic play of light and shadow, while maintaining a fidelity to the laws of physics.

Continue reading after the jump.

French law mandates green roofs or solar panels on all new buildings in commercial zones

Montmartre Funicular Railway (Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

Montmartre Funicular Railway (Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

It’s serious crunch time in France for environmental policymaking as regulations tighten in deference to the 2020 goal of reducing carbon emissions by 25 percent. Paris is also scrambling for brownie points as it prepares to host the UN Conference on Climate Change this November.

Lawmakers in France recently decreed that all rooftops of new commercial buildings must be covered in either plants or solar panels. Other major cities have gone to similarly stringent lengths, with the city of Toronto, Canada, mandating green roofs on all new buildings in 2009—whether residential, industrial or commercial.

Continue reading after the jump.

Misplaced monuments: Designers take to Photoshop to transplant world landmarks in new locations

Architecture, Art, International
Wednesday, June 10, 2015
.
The Eiffel Tower planted on the Bavarian Alps in Germany where the Neuschwanstein Castle stands (Courtesy DesignCrowd.com.au)

The Eiffel Tower planted on the Bavarian Alps in Germany where the Neuschwanstein Castle stands (Courtesy DesignCrowd.com.au)

When it comes to a famous landmark, to what extent does locale add to its majesty? An inventive design competition posted to Australian virtual design studio DesignCrowd explored this question with a challenge to designers to reposition the world’s most hyped monuments in all-new locations using high-resolution images.

More after the jump.

An architect from Vancouver wants to build the world’s tallest wooden skyscraper over a roadway in Paris

Baobab in Paris. (Courtesy Michael Green Architecture)

Baobab in Paris. (Courtesy Michael Green Architecture)

Back in March, AN wrote about Rüdiger Lainer and Partners’ plan to construct a wood skyscraper in Vienna. The so-called HoHo project would rise 276 feet and be about three-quarters wood. Now, Vancouver-based architect Michael Green, whose eponymous firm is behind “the tallest mass timber building in the United States” has proposed a timber tower for Paris that would be 10 stories taller—making it the tallest such structure on earth. That is, if it gets built.

Read More

Paris pushes for car-free River Seine quayside park as anti-pollution measures tighten

(Courtesy Luxigon)

(Courtesy Luxigon)

In keeping with Paris’ mounting aversion to automobiles, Mayor Anne Hidalgo recently announced plans to bar motorists from the banks of the River Seine by summer 2016. This latest blow to motorists occurs in tandem with the all-or-nothing anti-pollution target Hidalgo set last year of banning all non-electric or hybrid vehicles from Paris’ most polluted streets by 2020.

Continue reading after the jump.

Court reverses decision on French architect Jean Nouvel’s lawsuit against the Philharmonie de Paris

Architecture, International, News
Thursday, April 23, 2015
.
(Montage by AN)

(Montage by AN)

Celebrated French architect Jean Nouvel lost a court case in which he sued the Philharmonie de Paris for removal of his name from the project due to major deviations from his original design. The court, which ruled in his favor on April 16 pending “additional detailed and comparative information,” reversed its decision hours later.

Read More

Electricity-generating Wind Trees will power Paris’ Place de la Concorde

Other
Monday, February 2, 2015
.
Rendering of the wind tree, which is designed to integrate with an urban environment. (Courtesy New Wind)

Rendering of the wind tree, which is designed to integrate with an urban environment. (Courtesy New Wind)

The power grid of the future may consist entirely of trees—and we don’t mean biofuel. French R&D company New Wind recently pioneered the “wind tree,” a wind turbine that is both silent and soothing to behold.

Continue reading after the jump.

Paris Politicians Embroiled in Not So Secret Skyscraper Spat

Architecture, International, News
Tuesday, November 18, 2014
.
Courtesy Herzog and de Meuron

(Courtesy Herzog and de Meuron)

Paris’ stringent urbanism laws triumphed yesterday in the city council’s vote to reject plans to build what would be the third tallest skyscraper in the city and the first such towering structure in over four decades. A breach of the secret ballot terms, however, has prompted socialist Mayor Anne Hidalgo to reject the vote after it came to light that opposition council members had revealed their decisions, with one official later tweeting a picture of himself brazenly holding his yellow ballot up in the air.

Continue reading after the jump.

Parisian preschool stays light and airy with an undulating glass facade screen

(Julien Attard)

This exterior shell enables light to penetrate into the building; it undulates slightly to indicate the entrances. (Julien Attard)

French architecture firm H20 Architectes has given light to a nursery school sited in an unusually tight and narrow courtyard site in Paris. Located in the shadow of surrounding buildings, the new facility has been designed with a glass facade and corresponding shade canopy that appears to lift effortlessly at the front entrance, belying its rigid construction.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> The Louvre opens major restoration of its Decorative Arts Galleries

Preliminary sketch for the Bas de Montargis and Oudry galleries by Jacques Garcia.

Preliminary sketch for the Bas de Montargis and Oudry galleries by Jacques Garcia.

If you like French decorative arts you should make your way this summer to the Louvre’s newly restored and reinstalled 18th century Decorative Arts Galleries. The collection is housed in 35 galleries spanning 23,000 square feet. Over 2,000 design pieces “in object-focused galleries and period-room settings” are on display.

Read More

Blue Plate Special: Bjarke Ingles Reinterprets Walter Gropius With “Big Cities” Dinnerware

(Courtesy BIG + KILO / Rosenthal)

(Courtesy BIG + KILO / Rosenthal)

In 1969, Walter Gropius designed a collection of china for Rosenthal. Named after his atelier in Cambridge, The Architects Collaborative, TAC’s elegant and curious forms are pristine in white porcelain. Embellishing Gropius’ design would naturally be heresy to some purists. To others, it would reflect his belief in the collaborative process. In their update of the tableware, called TAC Big Cities, architect Bjarke Ingels of BIG and Danish industrial design studio Kilo teamed up to create an urban motif for the collection.

Read More

Page 1 of 3123

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2015 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License