Architects propose a Ferris wheel hotel in Paris, and it might actually happen

(COURTESY SCAU ARCHITECTS)

(Courtesy Luxigon)

French architecture firm SCAU has designed a “water wheel hotel” on the Seine River, currently under consideration in Paris. During its six-month installment, people would be able to sleep in the slowly moving hotel for 300 euros a night. The water wheel structure would be built of wood and only take four days to assemble, meaning the hotel can easily be re-erected elsewhere.

More after the jump.

If at first you don’t succeed: Jean Nouvel’s leaning towers of Paris gets planning approval after initial rejection

Tours DUO (Courtesy L’Autre Image)

Tours DUO (Courtesy L’Autre Image)

After an initial rejection by officials from the Paris Council, French architect Jean Nouvel has been awarded planning permission for his firm’s so-called Duo Tower project on the Eastern banks of the Seine. Located in the Quartier De La Gare district of Paris, the project follows on the heels of another pyramidal tower by Herzog & De Meuron planned for the city.

Continue after the jump.

Today is World Architecture Day with an emphasis linking the built environment and climate—how are you celebrating?

Barriers on the Thames (Courtesy Aleem Yousaf / Flickr)

Barriers on the Thames (Courtesy Aleem Yousaf / Flickr)

Today is World Architecture Day. According to its organizers, the International Union of Architects (UIA), the theme of this year’s World Architecture Day is architecture, building, and climate. Founded in 1948, the NGO is a coalition of national organizations representing approximately 1.3 million architects from 124 countries.

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Walk this way: Architecture firm NBBJ proposes a moving sidewalk to replace London Underground Circle line

International, Transportation
Friday, September 11, 2015
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Courtesy NBBJ

(Courtesy NBBJ)

Architectural firm NBBJ has proposed a new three-lane moving sidewalk (or for the Brits, a travelator) system to replace 17-miles of the London Underground in a bid to decrease travel times and transport more people around London.

Continue reading after the jump.

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Meet the architect behind Kanye West’s 50-foot volcano, Los Angeles mansion, and design-savvy baby-proofing

Kanye atop a mountain on his Yeezus tour. (Peter Hutchins / Flickr)

Kanye atop a mountain on his Yeezus tour. (Peter Hutchins / Flickr)

Ironically, there are few surer ways to emerge from obscurity than to be hired by Kanye West. For Romanian architect Oana Stanescu, who designed a 50-foot stage-prop volcano for the rapper’s Yeezus tour, it meant finding a way to reconcile pop culture with utilitarian design.

Continue reading after the jump.

First in 40 Years: After initial rejection, Herzog & de Meuron’s triangular skyscraper is set to break ground in Paris

(Courtesy Tour Triangle)

(Courtesy Tour Triangle)

Paris’ city council ruling against the controversial Tour Triangle skyscraper back in 2014 was just overturned by the same governmental body. Mayor Anne Hidalgo approved of the jagged, triangular, Herzog & de Meuron–designed tower and has said she looks forward to the opportunities it will bring to the French capital.

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See the Grand Palais submerged in a virtual waterfall in 3D projection mapping design by Japanese art collective teamLab

(Courtesy teamLab)

(Courtesy teamLab)

Recently, Paris’ Grand Palais was awash in the cascade of a virtual waterfall, transforming the beaux-arts palace into a captivating scene from the lost city of Atlantis. TeamLab, a Japanese collective of technologists and artists, used 3D projection mapping to create the holographic play of light and shadow, while maintaining a fidelity to the laws of physics.

Continue reading after the jump.

French law mandates green roofs or solar panels on all new buildings in commercial zones

Montmartre Funicular Railway (Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

Montmartre Funicular Railway (Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

It’s serious crunch time in France for environmental policymaking as regulations tighten in deference to the 2020 goal of reducing carbon emissions by 25 percent. Paris is also scrambling for brownie points as it prepares to host the UN Conference on Climate Change this November.

Lawmakers in France recently decreed that all rooftops of new commercial buildings must be covered in either plants or solar panels. Other major cities have gone to similarly stringent lengths, with the city of Toronto, Canada, mandating green roofs on all new buildings in 2009—whether residential, industrial or commercial.

Continue reading after the jump.

Misplaced monuments: Designers take to Photoshop to transplant world landmarks in new locations

Architecture, Art, International
Wednesday, June 10, 2015
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The Eiffel Tower planted on the Bavarian Alps in Germany where the Neuschwanstein Castle stands (Courtesy DesignCrowd.com.au)

The Eiffel Tower planted on the Bavarian Alps in Germany where the Neuschwanstein Castle stands (Courtesy DesignCrowd.com.au)

When it comes to a famous landmark, to what extent does locale add to its majesty? An inventive design competition posted to Australian virtual design studio DesignCrowd explored this question with a challenge to designers to reposition the world’s most hyped monuments in all-new locations using high-resolution images.

More after the jump.

An architect from Vancouver wants to build the world’s tallest wooden skyscraper over a roadway in Paris

Baobab in Paris. (Courtesy Michael Green Architecture)

Baobab in Paris. (Courtesy Michael Green Architecture)

Back in March, AN wrote about Rüdiger Lainer and Partners’ plan to construct a wood skyscraper in Vienna. The so-called HoHo project would rise 276 feet and be about three-quarters wood. Now, Vancouver-based architect Michael Green, whose eponymous firm is behind “the tallest mass timber building in the United States” has proposed a timber tower for Paris that would be 10 stories taller—making it the tallest such structure on earth. That is, if it gets built.

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Paris pushes for car-free River Seine quayside park as anti-pollution measures tighten

(Courtesy Luxigon)

(Courtesy Luxigon)

In keeping with Paris’ mounting aversion to automobiles, Mayor Anne Hidalgo recently announced plans to bar motorists from the banks of the River Seine by summer 2016. This latest blow to motorists occurs in tandem with the all-or-nothing anti-pollution target Hidalgo set last year of banning all non-electric or hybrid vehicles from Paris’ most polluted streets by 2020.

Continue reading after the jump.

Court reverses decision on French architect Jean Nouvel’s lawsuit against the Philharmonie de Paris

Architecture, International, News
Thursday, April 23, 2015
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(Montage by AN)

(Montage by AN)

Celebrated French architect Jean Nouvel lost a court case in which he sued the Philharmonie de Paris for removal of his name from the project due to major deviations from his original design. The court, which ruled in his favor on April 16 pending “additional detailed and comparative information,” reversed its decision hours later.

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