New York City Mayor De Blasio and Cardinal Dolan working on plan for affordable housing on church properties

Development, East
Thursday, August 27, 2015
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Mayor Bill de Blasio hosts a meeting with Cardinal Timothy Dolan. (Demetrius Freeman/Mayoral Photography Office)

Mayor Bill de Blasio hosts a meeting with Cardinal Timothy Dolan. (Demetrius Freeman/Mayoral Photography Office)

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio had some face-to-face time with Cardinal Timothy Dolan this week, and among the topics the duo discussed was affordable housing. In a city of nosebleed-inducing housing prices, Dolan said creating and maintaining affordable housing was “God’s work,” according to AM New York.

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Signs of life: Artist Steve Powers tacks thought-provoking ‘ICY Signs’ around New York City

(Courtesy New York City Department of Transportation)

(Courtesy New York City Department of Transportation)

Manhattan-based artist Steve Powers is offering a non-caffeinated pick-me-up for weary NYC commuters with his pop art–style street signs mounted on light poles around the city. Bearing food-for-thought slogans with themes of life and love against a pictograph or logotype, such as “I get lost to get found” stamped on a briefcase, the signs are designed to inspire smiles and/or introspection.

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Beyer Blinder Belle restoring Marcel Breuer’s Whitney building for 2016 reopening under the Metropolitan Museum

Architecture, East, Preservation
Tuesday, August 25, 2015
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Marcel Breuer peers from the window of the former Whitney Museum in 1967. (Ezra Stoller / Esto)

Marcel Breuer peers from the window of the former Whitney Museum in 1967. (Ezra Stoller / Esto)

The Met Breuer will throw open its doors in March 2016 for the first season of contemporary art programming under the banner of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Breuer’s iconic building, formerly the Whitney Museum of American Art, is currently being “invigorated by renovations that will support a fluid, integrated experience of art and architecture,” as the Met’s press release proudly declares.

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Heroic Food Farms in rural New York teams up with Ennead to provide micro-housing, mentorship, and jobs to displaced veterans

Architecture, East, Unveiled
Tuesday, August 25, 2015
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(Courtesy Ennead Architects)

(Courtesy Ennead Architects)

Shaken by war and existentially disoriented, most veterans struggle to reintegrate and find work. A nonprofit food farm on the outskirts of New York City is being eyeballed as a possible housing and training solution for displaced veterans. The masterplan by Ennead Architects and RAFT Landscape Architecture includes eight micro-housing units for individuals or couples.

Continue reading after the jump.

DDG brings dramatic mountain terrain to its Tribeca condo conversion

DDG's 12 Warren Street. (Courtesy MARCH)

DDG’s 12 Warren Street. (Courtesy MARCH)

DDG, the architecture and development shop in New York City, is known for using natural materials and dressing its buildings with greenery. This has been the case at a slew of its high-end residential projects around the city, such as 41 Bond or 345 Meatpacking. The firm’s latest residential building at 12 Warren Street in Tribeca continues in that tradition—and then some.

Continue reading after the jump.

Meet the architect behind Kanye West’s 50-foot volcano, Los Angeles mansion, and design-savvy baby-proofing

Kanye atop a mountain on his Yeezus tour. (Peter Hutchins / Flickr)

Kanye atop a mountain on his Yeezus tour. (Peter Hutchins / Flickr)

Ironically, there are few surer ways to emerge from obscurity than to be hired by Kanye West. For Romanian architect Oana Stanescu, who designed a 50-foot stage-prop volcano for the rapper’s Yeezus tour, it meant finding a way to reconcile pop culture with utilitarian design.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Glimmering light installation recalls the destroyed baronial towers of Bannerman’s Castle near New York City

Art, East, Lighting, On View, Preservation
Tuesday, August 4, 2015
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Photo_by_Rob_Penner-copy

(Rob Penner)

We head home: through the gloss of rain or weight
of snow, or the plum blush of dusk, but always—home, …
facing the stars
hope—a new constellation
waiting for us to map it,
waiting for us to name it—together.

—One Day, by Robert Blanco. Written for the second Inauguration of President Barack Obama, January 21, 2013.

Melissa McGill’s light-based public art project, Constellation, arises from the romantic ruins of Bannerman’s Castle on Pollepel Island, a mysterious sight glimpsed from trains heading north 50 miles from New York City just shy of Beacon, and nearby to West Point and Storm King. If you’ve ever wondered about this fleeting apparition, this art installation, which will be up for two years, is the perfect vehicle for visiting the island or gazing from the riverbank.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Here’s how Morris Adjmi’s ghostly aluminum carbon copy of a warehouse in Tribeca is shaping up

(Courtesy Field Condition)

(Courtesy Field Condition)

On a prime Tribeca corner, Morris Adjmi has transformed an early 19th century coffee and tea warehouse into a fancy condo building—and built a mirror-image replica of the stately structure right next to it. Well, almost.

Continue reading after the jump.

Letter to the Editor> Meet the Street

The AIANY's Center for Architecture in Manhattan. (Courtesy Andrew Berman Architect)

The AIANY’s Center for Architecture in Manhattan. (Courtesy Andrew Berman Architect)

We saw your editorial on design organizations (“Design Organizations Need to Meet the Street”) and were thrilled to see the positive things you had to say about the Center for Architecture.

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London skyline as battleground: Designers render 3D-printed chess pieces in the shape of iconic architecture

(Courtesy Skyline Chess)

(Courtesy Skyline Chess)

City skylines can seem at times like battlegrounds, with architects vying for superlatives of tallest, grandest, and bizarrest. Skyline Chess, founded by London-based designers Chris Prosser and Ian Flood, reimagines chess pieces as miniature models of the city’s landmark buildings.

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David Adjaye’s new Studio Museum in Harlem includes an “inverted stoop” to welcome in the neighborhood

The Studio Museum in Harlem. (Courtesy Adjaye Associates)

The Studio Museum in Harlem. (Courtesy Adjaye Associates)

David Adjaye is bringing another significant project to Upper Manhattan. Thirty blocks south of his $80 million affordable housing project in Sugar Hill, another notable building by the architect will rise: the new, 71,000-square-foot Studio Museum in Harlem.

Continue reading after the jump.

ODA bucks a shortlist of 14 firms to design pair of controversial Brooklyn Bridge Park towers

Pier 6 towers. (Courtesy ODA Archtiecture)

Pier 6 towers. (Courtesy ODA Architecture)

Last August, the Brooklyn Bridge Park Corporation (BBPC) unveiled 14 proposed designs for a pair of controversial towers it planned to build near the park’s southern-most pier. Under a Bloomberg-era development plan, sites along the park would be leased to private developers to finance the upkeep of Michael Van Valkenburgh‘s 85-acre green space. These two towers near Pier 6 represented the last piece of the development puzzle.

But now there’s been a change.

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