Review> Richard Estes’s photorealistic paintings of New York on view at the Museum of Arts and Design

Architecture, Art, East, Newsletter, On View, Review
Wednesday, March 18, 2015
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Richard Estes, The Plaza's Plaza from a city bus, 1991.

Richard Estes, The Plaza’s Plaza from a city bus, 1991.

Richard Estes: Painting New York City
Museum of Arts & Design
New York
Through September 20, 2015

The first exhibition of art at this institution originally and primarily devoted to craft consists of photorealist paintings spanning 50 years by one of the most accomplished masters of the style. And in the dispassionate way typical of this artist and the genre, they show some subtle changes that have taken place in the cityscape.

Continue reading after the jump.

It will cost $11 billion to fix the Port Authority Bus Terminal, so says the Port Authority

Development, East, Transportation
Wednesday, March 18, 2015
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Port Authority Bus Terminal. (Flickr /  Eric Allix Rogers)

Port Authority Bus Terminal. (Flickr /
Eric Allix Rogers)

The Port Authority of New York & New Jersey claimed it will cost $11 billion to overhaul its supremely hated bus terminal in Manhattan. Yes, everyone agrees the place is pretty much a dump, but $11 billion? That sure seems steep.

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Remember the Battery Park City wheatfield? Conceptual artist is back with a horticultural pyramid in Queens

(Courtesy Socrates Sculpture Park)

(Courtesy Socrates Sculpture Park)

Monuments of pre-civilization feats in construction and engineering, pyramids are the latest muse of conceptual artist Agnes Denes who, in 1982, transformed what is now Battery Park City into a two-acre wheatfield.

Continue reading after the jump.

With this purchase of five acres of waterfront land, is the South Bronx New York’s newest development hot spot?

Development, East, News, Skyscrapers
Tuesday, March 17, 2015
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(Courtesy Bing)

(Courtesy Bing)

The Chetrit Group and Somerset Partners are betting big on the Bronx. The developers have recently purchased 5 acres of industrial land along the Harlem River. The Wall Street Journal reported that they plan to build up to six 25-story market-rate apartment towers on the land.

Continue reading after the jump.

Eavesdrop> Ferry Fiasco: Ice shuts down ferry service on New York City’s East River

A ferry struggles with ice on the East River. (Several seconds / Flickr)

A ferry struggles with ice on the East River. (Several seconds / Flickr)

 

As AN reported, it will be quite difficult for New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio to pull off his plan to launch a five-borough ferry system. There are, of course, the obvious issues surrounding subsidies, ridership, operators, and dock placement that could all cause major headaches down the road. While the mayor starts charting his path through these details, another potential problem came to the fore: winter weather.

Continue reading after the jump.

After a year-long search, the Met chooses David Chipperfield to design the museum’s new wing

The Met. (Flickr / Andrew Mace)

The Met. (Flickr / Andrew Mace)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art has announced that David Chipperfield has been selected to “develop a new design for the Southwest Wing for modern and contemporary art, and potentially for adjacent galleries for the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas, as well as additional operational spaces.”

Continue reading after the jump.

CetraRuddy’s latest New York City skyscraper goes curvy, slender, and cellular

242 w. 53rd Street. (Courtesy CetraRuddy)

242 w. 53rd Street. (Courtesy CetraRuddy)

The latest glassy residential tower to rise on Manhattan’s West Midtown comes courtesy of Cetra RuddyCurbed spotted renderings of the 625-foot-tall condo tower that is slated to rise on the site of the Roseland Ballroom, a beloved New York City concert venue that shuttered in April.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Brooklyn protestors use “light graffiti” to urge Bill de Blasio to fund long-promised park

(Courtesy Gothamist)

(Courtesy Gothamist)

As AN recently reported, a fire that destroyed a warehouse in Williamsburg, Brooklyn has rekindled questions about a long-promised waterfront park. Back in 2005, Michael Bloomberg rezoned much of Williamsburg and Greenpoint leading to a surge in glassy towers. With those towers was supposed to come Bushwick Inlet Park, a 28-acre green space along the East River. But in the decade since, only parts of the park have been completed.

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Talking SHoP with facades expert Gregg Pasquarelli

SHoP Architects' 626 First Avenue, currently under construction. (Courtesy SHoP)

SHoP Architects’ 626 First Avenue, currently under construction. (Courtesy SHoP)

Since its founding in 1996, SHoP Architects has been committed to fostering architectural innovation despite on-the-ground constraints. In New York, those constraints often take the form of municipal regulations. “From day one SHoP was always a firm that was interested in pushing the limits of design, really getting into materials and craftsmanship,” said principal Gregg Pasquarelli. “But we were also building in the pressure tank of New York, where a lot of the innovation has to occur in the skins of the buildings, because zoning is so prescriptive.” Pasquarelli will outline his firm’s approach to cutting-edge facade design in the context of New York’s regulatory environment in the afternoon keynote address at next month’s Facades+ NYC conference.

Continue reading after the jump.

Comment> The Met Plaza redesign undermines the institution’s civic grandeur

The old Met plaza. (Courtesy Paul Gunther)

The old Met plaza. (Courtesy Paul Gunther)

In February of the year 2012, when the Metropolitan Museum of Art first announced the redesign of the City-owned Fifth Avenue-fronted plaza along its grand McKim, Mead & White Beaux-Arts facade, there was little opposition from preservationists. A $65 million underwriting pledge from museum trustee, David H. Koch, catalyzed the selected competitive plan from Philadelphia-based OLIN. It proceeded through the approval process with relative dispatch.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Artist invites viewers to walk through steel at the New Museum’s 2015 Triennial

Art, East, On View
Monday, March 9, 2015
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(Courtesy of Kriska Decor)

(Courtesy of Kriska Decor)

Streaming from the ceiling like colored rain, Daniel Steegmann Mangrané’s steel curtain installation is far less delicate than it appears. Up close, the completely see-through curtain of steel mesh looks like raindrops stitched together, whose straight-down free-fall is punctuated by geometric and and insect-like laser cutouts framed in powder-coated steel.

Continue reading after the jump.

Towering over Queens: Central Long Island City site to make way for another high rise

Development, East, Skyscrapers
Friday, March 6, 2015
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The site is marked in blue. (Courtesy Bing)

The site is marked in blue. (Courtesy Bing)

Yet another tower could rise in Long Island City, Queens. Citigroup is expected to sell a prime development site next to its SOM-designed, 51-story turquoise office tower that dominates the neighborhood’s skyline.

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