The Frick Collection cancels controversial expansion plan by Davis Brody Bond

Frick Collection expansion plans. (Courtesy Davis Brody Bond.)

Frick Collection expansion plans. (Courtesy Davis Brody Bond)

The Frick Collection has called off its controversial expansion plan, reports the New York Times. The surprising news comes one year after the museum unveiled a scheme by David Brody Bond to build a six-story addition and fill in its beloved Russell Page Garden. Removing the garden (and replacing it with a new rooftop garden) did not sit well with preservationists who came out swinging against the expansion.

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Kohn Pedersen Fox’s One Vanderbilt now has all the approval it needs to climb 1,501 feet over Manhattan

One Vanderbilt. (Courtesy KPF)

One Vanderbilt. (Courtesy KPF)

In late May, the New York City Council unanimously voted in favor of a plan to upzone a five-block stretch of Vanderbilt Avenue next to Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan. The widely expected move gives developer SL Green the green light to start work on its 1,501-foot-tall office tower known as One Vanderbilt.

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Piece by piece, Watch as New York City’s first micro-unit housing complex by nArchitects takes shape

Rendering of Carmel Place. (Courtesy nARCHITECTS)

Rendering of Carmel Place. (Courtesy nARCHITECTS)

New York City‘s first-ever entirely micro-unit housing complex is being stacked together on Manhattan‘s East Side. Back in February, we wrote that the modules for the nARCHITECTS-designed building were being assembled at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, and now we can report that they have begun arriving at their permanent home in Kips Bay.

Watch the video after the jump.

Viñoly’s latest Manhattan skyscraper will only be half the size of his 432 Park tower, but that’s still really tall

Vinoly's 281 Fifth Avenue. (Courtesy Victor Homes via YIMBY)

Vinoly’s 281 Fifth Avenue. (Courtesy Victor Homes via YIMBY)

Rafael Viñoly‘s latest Manhattan luxury tower almost seems quaint next to his 1,396-foot-tall, trashcan-inspired 432 Park AvenueNY YIMBY has published renderings of the architect’s 281 Fifth Avenue in NoMad, which is only about half the size of his Park Avenue behemoth.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Watch One World Trade, New York City’s tallest skyscraper, rise in less than two minutes

One World Trade Center. (AN)

One World Trade Center. (AN)

With the recent opening of One World Trade Center, the folks over at EarthCam have reshared their 2013 timelapse of the tower’s 1,776 foot rise. There’s not too much else to say about the video, other than that it sure makes the building’s very long and arduous climb seem pretty quick and easy. It’s also set to some very Game of Thrones-y music, so it has that going for it too.

Watch the video after the jump.

Was Rafael Viñoly’s 432 Park tower inspired by an architect-designed trashcan?

Is 432 Park really a supertall trashcan? (Montage by AN)

Is 432 Park really a supertall trashcan? (Montage by AN)

AN had the unique opportunity to walk around the top floor of the supertall 432 Park Avenue tower, where the full-floor penthouse with a $95 million view of Central Park is nearing completion. A Saudi billionaire, Fawaz Al Hokair, was recently announced as the buyer. Ironically, The Real Deal has reported this week that it was also announced by one of the architects—at a Cornell Center for Real Estate and Finance lecture in December—that the Rafael Viñoly design was inspired by, wait for it, a trashcan.

Continue reading after the jump.

Degradation by design: artist Sam Falls explores how materials change with the passage of time

City Terrain, Design, East
Monday, June 1, 2015
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(Courtesy James Ewing/Public Art Fund NY)

(Courtesy James Ewing/Public Art Fund NY)

Time and its degenerating aspect came under scrutiny in a public installation by Los Angeles–based artist Sam Falls. Light Over Time casts everyday outdoor objects such as benches, scales, and seesaws in an experiment of the long-term effects of sunlight, rain, and temperature on diverse materials including painted aluminum, heat-sensitive tiles, and colored glass.

Continue reading after the jump.

Peter Marino unveils an unusually restrained High Line condo project

Rendering of the proposed building and the site today. (Courtesy Peter Marino Architect; Google)

Rendering of the proposed building and the site today. (Courtesy Peter Marino Architect; Google)

In the insane race to build more and more luxury condos in New York City, the High Line is staking its claim as the scrappy younger sibling of Billionaire’s Row on 57th Street. The latest addition will be an 8-unit, 47,000 square-foot building by “the leather daddy of luxury,” Peter Marino.

Continue reading after the jump.

World Science Festival in New York City lets you listen to the sounds of satellites from the comfort of your home planet

Architecture, Design, East
Thursday, May 28, 2015
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The NASA Orbit Pavilion. (Courtesy World Science Festival)

The NASA Orbit Pavilion. (Courtesy World Science Festival)

If you live in New York City, or are in town this weekend, you might want to check out the World Science Festival, specifically the NASA Orbit Pavilion currently located on NYU’s Gould Plaza.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Another supertall tower to rise in Manhattan’s increasingly crowded supertall district

1 Park Lane. (Witkoff)

1 Park Lane. (Witkoff)

If you guessed that the newest luxury tower planned for Midtown, Manhattan would be very tall, skinny, and glassy then you, wise architectural observer, are correct. But don’t be too proud of your guessing skills—predicting that a luxury New York City skyscraper will be a glass-wrapped giant is like guessing Hillary Clinton will be the Democratic nominee. It’s too easy is what we’re saying.

Meet New York’s latest tower after the jump.

Step inside COOKFOX’s new Brooklyn tower complex

The Affordable Building. (Courtesy Field Condition)

The Affordable Building. (Courtesy Field Condition)

Prolific construction watcher Field Condition recently toured phase two of COOKFOX‘s under-construction City Point development in Downtown Brooklyn. The firm’s new pair of towers are already standing out in Brooklyn’s bummer of a skyline with their non-glass facades and series of setbacks.

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This stack of shipping containers by LOT-EK could become the nomadic coworking office of the future

(Courtesy LOT-EK / Spacious)

(Courtesy LOT-EK / Spacious)

The future of the mobile office is on its way, and it’s blurring the lines between the home and the workplace. Spacious is the name of a “coworking hotel” concept being touted by its founder and CEO, Preston Pesek, as the future of the workplace, combining a traditional coworking space, a hotel, and retail into a giant live, work, play experience. And what better way to house the modern nomadic workforce than shipping containers?

Continue reading after the jump.

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