Imma let you finish, but Kanye West had the best minimalist Manhattan bachelor pad of all time

(Courtesy Claudio Silvestrin Architects)

(Courtesy Claudio Silvestrin Architects)

The utilitarian Manhattan loft formerly owned by rap mogul Kanye West bespeaks deep pockets and a distaste for cluttering decor. The 1,585 square foot bachelor pad, which West sold in 2013 for $4.5 million, is an ultra-minimalist expanse of French limestone and pear wood—and not much else.

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Review> Poking at Power: New Parsons Exhibition Ridicules Dictators

(Helga Taxler)

(Helga Taxler)

At the Aronson Galleries at the New School, a wall of pickle jars taped with black-and-white cutout portraits of twenty dictators lines the windowsill. A standard 8 ½ x 11 paper sign invites visitors to Pick Your Own Dick by placing a poker chip in a jar. Chairman Mao, a world-class “dick” whose Cultural Revolution starved and murdered millions of Chinese, and Turkish President Erdogan, an elected Muslim fundamentalist morphing into a military strongman, handily won opening night.

Romancing True Power: D20, the mischievous exhibition designed by Srdjan Jovanovic Weiss of NAO and conceived by Nina Khrushcheva, associate dean and professor at the Milano School of International Affairs, Management, and Urban Policy at the New School, cheekily invites public debate about the nature of and difference between types of dictatorship, taking special glee in thumbing its nose at ostentatious symbols of power. The exhibit was accompanied by a journal compiled by Khrushcheva with Yiqing Wang-Holborn and by a book of graphic novellas designed as a result of Weiss’s seminar on new ideologies at Columbia GSAPP, both profiling selected dictators and their trappings.

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SHoP Architects’ first tower at Brooklyn’s Domino Sugar site breaks ground with a refined design

"Site E." (Courtesy SHoP via Two Trees)

“Site E.” (Courtesy SHoP)

As AN has been reporting for a while now, it’s all systems go for the long-stalled Domino Sugar Factory redevelopment on the Brooklyn waterfront. Crews have been demolishing old structures on the site for months, and today we got word that the developer, Two Trees, is breaking ground on the massive project’s first residential building: a 16-story, 500-unit rental building designed by SHoP, which is designing the entire project.

Continue reading after the jump.

As New York City builds its first micro-units, Portlandia expertly mocks the trend

Architecture, Development, East, Urbanism
Thursday, February 26, 2015
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My Micro NY. (Courtesy nARCHITECTS)

My Micro NY. (Courtesy nARCHITECTS)

The concept of micro-living is really having a moment right now. For starters, there is a TV shaw called Tiny House Nation that celebrates the trend of packing fully functioning homes into bite-sized spaces where all redundancies are removed and functionality is king. Beds become couches, kitchen counters become desks, bathtubs become second bedrooms, and so on and so forth.

Continue reading after the jump.

Brooklyn’s 56 Bogart is at the center of the New York City art world

Art, East, On View
Wednesday, February 25, 2015
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Henry Khudyakov's Environmental Motif, 1985-1994. (Courtesy Henry Khudyakov)

Henry Khudyakov’s Environmental Motif, 1985-1994. (Courtesy Henry Khudyakov)

 

If the address 56 Bogart in Brooklyn means nothing to you then you’re missing the center of the art world in New York City in 2015. Forget about Chelsea and the Bowery, Bushwick and East Williamsburg are the most exciting exhibition outposts in the city and maybe in the country. It’s Soho 40 years ago as any Saturday afternoon stroll along Bogart Street will make clear with its cafes, bars, restaurants and working artists lofts on every block.

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How New York City plans to make affordable housing taller and more architecturally interesting

(Flickr / Anthony Quintano)

(Flickr / Anthony Quintano)

Last year, at an event inside David Adjaye’s Sugar Hill affordable housing development in Manhattan, AN asked New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio how architecture and design factored into his overall housing plan. The mayor—who doesn’t elevate public design the way Michael Bloomberg did—said he wants to see new affordable housing buildings that are both “beautiful” and “contextually appropriate.” But, he added, design is about more than aesthetics, it is a tool to be wielded to create dynamic, mixed-use properties. “I think the design question really is about, to me, the functionality—meaning, what we can achieve in a site,” said the mayor.

Continue reading after the jump.

Mind the Gender Gap: Findings of gender equity in architecture survey this Friday in New York

Architecture, East, National, On View
Monday, February 23, 2015
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missing32-report-04

A number of advocacy organizations questioning the ethics of architecture practice in the United States have received a flurry of attention recently. The New York Times commented recently on the San Francisco–based Architects/Designers/Planners for Social Responsibility’s petition to revise the AIA’s stance on solitary confinement and torture. The New York–based Architecture Lobby made waves in 2014 with protests denouncing the continued prevalence of unpaid labor among architects. Before that, Harvard’s Women in Design provoked top figures in the field to take a stance on the failure of the industry’s awards to adequately acknowledge collaboration in 2013.

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Video> Here are the nitty-gritty details how how MoMA PS1’s COSMO pavilion will filter water

COSMO.( COURTESY ANDRES JACQUE ARCHITECTS/OFFICE FOR POLITICAL INNOVATION_

COSMO. (COURTESY ANDRES JACQUE ARCHITECTS/OFFICE FOR POLITICAL INNOVATION_

The New York City and Madrid-based architecture firm Andres Jaque Architects/Office for Political Innovation has released a wonky video explaining its mobile, water purifying installation which recently won MoMA PS 1‘s Young Architects Program. The futuristic-looking structure, called COSMO, is comprised primarily of suspended hoses that will filter 3,000 gallons of water over the course of four days.

Watch the video after the jump.

With slight alterations, controversial Brooklyn Bridge Park development to start back up

Architecture, Development, East
Friday, February 20, 2015
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The Pierhouse in January. (Courtesy Field Condition)

The Pierhouse in January. (Courtesy Field Condition)

In our recent story about the current development surge happening in and around Dumbo, we touched on the controversy surrounding the Pierhouse—an under-construction hotel and condo complex next to the Brooklyn Bridge. The Marvel Architects–designed building, which will help cover Brooklyn Bridge Park‘s maintenance costs, has riled up local residents who say it is blocking their views of the iconic bridge.

Continue reading after the jump.

Winning Designs for World’s First Sci-Fi Museum on View at Brooklyn Public Library

Architecture, Awards, East, On View, Unveiled
Friday, February 20, 2015
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Architectural Design Jury Awarded First Place - Schrodinger’s Box, submitted by Emily Yen, USA

Architectural Design Jury Awarded First Place – Schrodinger’s Box, submitted by Emily Yen, USA

 

Science fiction’s outlandish imaginings are set to become reality, with  the top 10 designs for the world’s first sci-fi museum on display at the Brooklyn Public Library through May 31. Naturally, the first-of-its-kind project warrants no less than a high-tech, out-of-this-world edifice worthy of Star Trek. The winning design by graduate student Emily Yen, titled Schrödinger’s Box, proposes a 3,990 square foot modular museum comprised of a trapezoid frame with infilled planes at various heights (think staggered wall shelving).

COntinue reading after the jump.

Penthouse in Philip Johnson’s Pomo masterpiece to be listed at $150 million

The penthouse could be yours for just $150 million. (Flickr / Joe Shlabotnik)

The penthouse could be yours for just $150 million. (Flickr / Joe Shlabotnik)

Hey, one percenters, listen up (or pay someone to do it for you) because we’ve got some exciting news that might pique your interest. All the rest of you non-global-elite types can amscray. That’s right, you heard us, get out of here. It’s for your own good.

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Video> Watch Bjarke Ingels’ Manhattan “Dry Line” form before your eyes

The berm. (Courtesy BIG)

The berm. (Courtesy BIG)

The Bjarke Ingels Group’s plan to wrap Lower Manhattan in a landscape berm to keep floodwaters at bay was definitely one of the most architecturally interesting proposals to come from Rebuild By Design, the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s competition to boost resiliency in a post-Sandy world. Last June, the plan—known as “The BIG U” or “The Dry Line”—also became the competitions’s biggest winner.

Watch the video after the jump.

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