Brooklyn Bridge Park’s overly bouncy pedestrian bridge remains overly bouncy, off limits

Squibb Park Bridge pre-Pierhouse development. (Branden Klayko / AN)

Squibb Park Bridge pre-Pierhouse development. (Branden Klayko / AN)

When it opened in 2013, the Squibb Park Bridge that zigzagged between Brooklyn Heights and Brooklyn Bridge Park instantly became one of the most thrilling pieces of the waterfront retreat. The HNTB-designed pedestrian bridge was designed to have some bounce in it, so getting to the park was more than a typical pedestrian experience, it was a fun little adventure. At least for the humans voyaging across it—dogs hated it. The petrified, why-are-you-doing-this-to-me looks on their faces as the wood structure ebbed and flowed were haunting.

And perhaps offered more-than-a-little foreshadowing.

This graffiti-covered Bowery landmark is about to turn luxury, but developers plan to preserve years of spray paint on its walls

(Courtesy MdeAS Architects)

(Courtesy MdeAS Architects)

In December, AN wrote that prolific developer Aby Rosen had picked up 190 Bowery—a six-story, graffiti-covered Renaissance Revival building that had been the private home and studio of photographer Jay Maisel since 1956. Maisel purchased the building for $102,000 and repeatedly turned down offers to sell it despite its skyrocketing value. Rosen’s RFR Realty ultimately purchased the landmarked property for $55 million.

Continue reading after the jump.

May 15> AN’s Bill Menking talks architecture with SO-IL’s Jing Liu at designjunction

Architecture, East
Thursday, May 7, 2015
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SO-IL's Kukje Gallery in Seoul, South Korea. (Courtesy SO-IL)

SO-IL’s Kukje Gallery in Seoul, South Korea. (Courtesy SO-IL)

Designjunction a London-based showcase for cutting-edge design labels (including Decode, Muuto, Modus, and Another Country) and young and emerging designers will stage its first U.S. show on May 15th. The fair will take place at Art Beam (540 West 21st Street) and The Architect’s Newspaper will be there.

William Menking, AN‘s editor-in-chief, will interview SO-IL partner Jing Liu about the young Brooklyn firm’s growing portfolio of projects here and abroad. The breakfast-time conversation will begin at 9:00a.m. on May 15 at Art Beam and guests may RSVP at designjunction.

Santiago Calatrava’s World Trade Center Transportation Hub begins to open up to the public

The PATH train's Platform B will open to the public at Santiago Calatrava's World Trade Center Transportation Hub. (Courtesy Port Authority)

The PATH train’s Platform B will open to the public at Santiago Calatrava’s World Trade Center Transportation Hub. (Courtesy Port Authority)

After all these years (read: delays), the public will finally be able to check out the grand oculus in Santiago Calatrava‘s $3.9 billion World Trade Center Transportation Hub—starting next month.

Continue reading after the jump.

All through May, Times Square billboards to display Andy Warhol video footage from the 60s

Art, East, Media
Tuesday, May 5, 2015
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(Courtesy Milk Made)

(Courtesy Milk Made)

The artist whose name is linked inextricably to screen prints of Marilyn Monroe and the Campbell’s soup can also had a fruitful career in feature films, producing  Andy Warhol’s Frankenstein and Chelsea Girls. As part of the Midnight Moments series, Times Square will run screen tests by Andy Warhol on its billboards to replace its million-dollar neon advertising—for a fleeting three minutes a day, anyway.

Continue reading after the jump.

Come celebrate NYCxDesign with The Architect’s Newspaper at these great Design Week events

Architecture, Art, Design
Monday, May 4, 2015
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(Courtesy NYCXDESIGN)

(Courtesy NYCXDESIGN)

AN is participating in some great events during the upcoming NYCxDesign—the city’s annual celebration of all things design. If you live in New York, or are in town from May 8–19, here are some key happenings to keep on your radar.

More after the jump.

ODA reveals two new boxy New York City towers, each featuring an urban forest

ODA's 303 E. 44th St. (Courtesy ODA)

ODA’s 303 E. 44th St. (Courtesy ODA)

ODA recently unveiled two major New York City projects, both of which are tall and expectedly boxy. The first is a 600-foot-tall, super-skinny tower near the United Nations. The Daily News reported that the building has “six 16-foot-high gaps in the facade—each filled with a full-floor, canopied green space that will wrap around the core of the tower.”

Read More

Renzo Piano designs a handbag replica of his new Whitney Museum of American Art

Architecture, Art, Design, East, Product
Tuesday, April 28, 2015
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(Montage by AN)

(Montage by AN)

The new Whitney Museum of American Art is opening on Friday, May 1. (Get your sneak peek inside the museum over here!) But a whopping 28,000 ton museum isn’t the only thing Renzo Piano has up his sleeve—he’s also designed the must-have fashion accessory with which to be seen browsing art at Manhattan’s newest Meatpacking District hotspot. Behold, the “Whitney Bag.”

Read More

Catch this show of Lina Bo Bardi’s furniture and Roberto Burle Marx’s tapestries before it closes!

Inside the exhibition. (Courtesy R & Company)

Inside the exhibition. (Courtesy R & Company)

Tribeca’s R & Company gallery at 82 Franklin Street is highlighting two Brazilian greats: Lina Bo Bardi (1914–1992) and Roberto Burle Marx (1909–1994). But act fast! Furniture by Bo Bardi and tapestries by Burle Marx are on display through the end of this week—the exhibit closes April 30.

Continue reading after the jump.

FXFOWLE broke ground on this sustainability seeking Long Island City high-rise on Earth Day

(Courtesy FXFOWLE)

The new tower rendered at left. (Courtesy FXFOWLE)

A new tower designed by FXFowle will bring a touch of design to Long Island City’s ever-growing skyline of glassy and generic residential buildings. For starters, the 35-story luxury rental tower is differentiated by a rust-colored steel that encases the podium and runs up its sides, framing three glassy expanses.

Continue reading after the jump.

Norman Foster or Bjarke Ingels, who will be designing the final tower at the World Trade Center?

Norman Foster, left. Bjarke Ingels, right. Foster's design for 2 World Trade Center, center. (Montage by AN)

Norman Foster, left. Bjarke Ingels, right. Foster’s design for 2 World Trade Center, center. (Montage by AN)

A few weeks ago AN noted that the Norman Foster–designed 2 World Trade Center might finally rise after all these years. The New York Times was reporting that Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation and 21st Century Fox were in talks to lease half the building for a joint headquarters. If it were to happen, wrote the Times, Murdoch’s team might bring in a new architect to update Foster’s design. Now it’s looking like that is exactly what’s going to happen—and it’s going to happen in an, ahem, BIG way.

Continue reading after the jump.

AN Video> Take an exclusive look inside The Beekman, one of the world’s first skyscrapers

5 Beekman. (The Architect's Newspaper)

5 Beekman. (The Architect’s Newspaper)

A few blocks south of City Hall in Manhattan is 5 Beekman—one of New York City’s most intriguing historic landmarks. Behind the building’s brick facade is an ornate, nine-story, glass-pyramid-topped atrium that has been off limits for more than a decade. The Architect’s Newspaper took a behind-the-scenes tour of the building with the architect who is bringing it back to life as a boutique hotel.

Watch the video after the jump.

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