ODA bucks a shortlist of 14 firms to design pair of controversial Brooklyn Bridge Park towers

Pier 6 towers. (Courtesy ODA Archtiecture)

Pier 6 towers. (Courtesy ODA Architecture)

Last August, the Brooklyn Bridge Park Corporation (BBPC) unveiled 14 proposed designs for a pair of controversial towers it planned to build near the park’s southern-most pier. Under a Bloomberg-era development plan, sites along the park would be leased to private developers to finance the upkeep of Michael Van Valkenburgh‘s 85-acre green space. These two towers near Pier 6 represented the last piece of the development puzzle.

But now there’s been a change.

Striking concrete workers stop construction at 30 New York City development sites

Development, East
Wednesday, July 1, 2015
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Hudson Yards as seen from the High Line. (Flickr /  gigi_nyc)

Hudson Yards as seen from the High Line. (Flickr / gigi_nyc)

On Wednesday, construction came to halt at 30 sites in New York City, including Hudson Yards, after cement workers went on strike. Crain’s reported, “At midnight this morning, a collective bargaining agreement ran out between the council of carpenters and a trade organization called the Cement League. The league is made up of contractors that erect the concrete skeletons for high-rise buildings and hire district council workers for part of that job under a collective contract.” As of Wednesday afternoon, the strike was ongoing.

Breaking> Nader Tehrani named dean of Cooper Union School of Architecture

Nader Tehrani

Nader Tehrani

New York City’s Cooper Union finally found a new leader. Nader Tehrani has been appointed dean of the Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture. He joins the school this month, taking over where Anthony Vidler left off. Tehrani, formerly of Office dA, is now principal of NADAAA.

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Broken umbrellas and bicycle wheels get a second life in these two, completely recyclable pavilions on Governors Island

(Courtesy Izaskun Chinchilla Architects)

(Courtesy Izaskun Chinchilla Architects)

Two whimsical summer pavilions on New York City’s Governors Island have been slated for reuse elsewhere, themselves built from recycled and repurposed materials.

The Billion Oyster Pavilion by BanG Studio and the Organic Growth Pavilion by Izaskun Chinchilla Architects both tied as winners in the annual City of Dreams design competition, and the jury, torn between the two, greenlighted both pavilions, launching a dedicated Kickstarter campaign to crowdfund their construction.

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DDG is set to begin construction on this razor-edged, triangular building in Tribeca

100 Franklin Street. (Courtesy DDG Partners)

100 Franklin Street. (Courtesy DDG)

Two very narrow parking lots in Manhattan’s Tribeca neighborhood will soon be filled in with a pair of very narrow condo buildings designed and developed by DDG. The firm’s plan for 100 Franklin Street was approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission in early 2014, but only recently made it through the Board of Standards and Appeals (BSA) which had to grant a zoning variance for the site.

More after the jump.

New York City’s first micro-unit housing complex stacks up in just one month

Carmel Place. (Courtesy Field Condition)

Carmel Place. (Courtesy Field Condition)

It took just about one month to fully stack New York City‘s first modular, micro-unit housing complex. The nARCHITECTS-designed building, known as Carmel Place is located on Manhattan’s East Side and offers 55 apartments that range between 260 and 360 square feet. You might remember that the project won Michael Bloomberg‘s adAPT NYC Competition back in 2013.

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Thomas Balsley unveils design for 8-acre green space at Pacific Park Brooklyn

Thomas Balsley's Pacific Park. ( COURTESY  VUW STUDIOS)

Thomas Balsley’s Pacific Park. ( COURTESY VUW STUDIOS)

After countless delays, plenty of controversy, and a few lawsuits, Brooklyn’s Pacific Park mega-development (formerly Atlantic Yards) is starting to take shape. The Barclays Center’s green roof is showing progress, SHoP’s long-delayed modular tower is rising again next door, and a pair of COOKFOX-designed residential buildings are underway at the development’s eastern edge. And now, the project’s new namesake, the 8-acre Pacific Park, has finally been unveiled.

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ODA reveals Eliot Spitzer–developed stack of boxes in Williamsburg inspired by icebergs

(Courtesy ODA)

(Courtesy ODA)

Stacked boxes are all the architectural rage these days—from Bjarke Ingels’ Two World Trade, to ODA’s Midtown skyscraper, to ODA’s Financial District skyscraper, to ODA’s Bushwick residential project, to ODA’s Williamsburg condos, to ODA’s other boxy buildings in Long Island City, Harlem, and the Lower East Side. It should surprise nobody, then, that ODA‘s latest project will stay true to the firm’s trademark form.

Continue reading after the jump.

Architectural Record sold for the second time in less than a year

Architecture, Media, National
Tuesday, June 16, 2015
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Architectural Record covers.

Architectural Record covers.

Architectural Record has been sold…again. Back in September, it was reported that McGraw-Hill Financial’s construction media portfolio—which included the publication, along with its data and analytics services—had been purchased by the Silicon Valley–based private equity firm Symphony Technology Group for $320 million. Now, Dodge Data & Analytics, the company which formed after McGraw-Hill Construction was sold, and includes Architectural Record, Engineering News-Record, Snap, and Sweets News & Products, has been picked up by BNP Media based in Troy, Michigan.

Continue reading after the jump.

Santiago Calatrava brings his signature style to Park Avenue with seven sculptures

(EPW Studio/ Maris Hutchinson, 2015)

(EPW Studio/ Maris Hutchinson, 2015)

Santiago Calatrava, currently the darling of George Clooney, has set up seven blade-like sculptures along Park Avenue in New York City. The installation is a collaboration between the Marlborough Gallery, the New York City Parks Department, and the Fund for Park Avenue.

More after the jump.

Bjarke Ingels mum on whether Two World Trade is a staircase for King Kong

(Renderings courtesy DBOX/BIG; Montage by AN)

(Renderings courtesy DBOX/BIG; Montage by AN)

The biggest architecture news this week was obviously the unveiling of Bjarke Ingels’ design for Two World Trade Center. The dramatic departure from Norman Foster‘s original proposal envisions the tower as a series of stepped volumes that gesture toward One World Trade. But does the step-ladder design—easily climbable by giant monsters like King Kong—pose a safety risk for New Yorkers? One petitioner is pleading with Ingels to change the design.

Continue reading after the jump.

Tadao Ando opens up about his first New York City building, architecture as living light, and an early career in professional boxing

Architecture, East, Newsletter
Thursday, June 11, 2015
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Rendering of Ando's 152 Elizabeth. (Courtesy Sumaida & Khurana)

Rendering of Ando’s 152 Elizabeth. (Courtesy Sumaida & Khurana)

New York developers Sumaida & Khurana are breaking architectural ground with a series of residential buildings in New York City designed by architects who have never built there before. Their first is a seven-unit beaut by Tadao Ando—called ICHIGONI (152) or 152 Elizabeth—set to bring glass-smooth concrete and highly detailed steel to Manhattan’s Nolita neighborhood. And now Ando is opening up about its design.

Watch the video after the jump.

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