Fumihiko Maki says architects who know better should speak up in the public’s interest

Fumihiko Maki addresses the Japan Society in New York. (James Way)

Fumihiko Maki addresses the Japan Society in New York. (James Way)

Octogenarian Fumihiko Maki shows no signs of slowing down, based on his presentation last night at the Japan Society in New York City. Going back as far as only the mid-1990s, the Pritzker Prize winner showed a handful of projects that, as moderator Toshiko Mori said, eschew a signature style yet are identifiably Maki buildings.

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Eavesdrop> The Bell Rings In Silence: Gossip swirls over changes at AIANY

East, Eavesdroplet, Shft+Alt+Del
Thursday, June 11, 2015
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Rick Bell. (ZOË SEIBEL)

Rick Bell. (ZOË SEIBEL)

There was one question on everybody’s mind in New York this spring: What happened to Rick Bell? On March 27, without warning or explanation, the former executive director of AIANY and the Center for Architecture tendered his resignation, effective immediately, which AIANY’s board of directors promptly accepted.

Read more after the jump.

Norwegian Invasion: Norsk design and architecture is having a moment

Architecture, Design, International
Wednesday, June 10, 2015
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Touchwood Chairs by Lars Beller Fjetland. (Courtesy Lars Beller Fjetland)

Touchwood Chairs by Lars Beller Fjetland. (Courtesy Lars Beller Fjetland)

When the words “Scandinavian Design” come up, most people quickly think about Finland, Sweden, and Denmark. But Norway is no slouch, either. Recently, the nation’s designers have been drumming up noise in the worlds of furniture, product design, and architecture. A string of exhibitions, a master plan for New York’s Times Square, and a robust program of roadside pavilions and viewing platforms highlight this Norsk moment.

Continue reading after the jump.

A long-abandoned New York City aqueduct reopens as bike and pedestrian path

At the High Bridge ribbon cutting. (NYC Parks Department)

City officials at the High Bridge ribbon cutting. (NYC Parks Department)

After 45 years, New York City’s oldest standing bridge has been returned to its former glory. On Tuesday, city officials and local advocates cut the ribbon on the newly-revitalized, High Bridge, which stretches 1,450 feet across the Harlem River, from Upper Manhattan to the Bronx.

COntinue reading after the jump.

AN Exclusive: Andres Jaque Explains Why This Year’s YAP Winner “COSMO” Is Being Built In Spain

COSMO Being assembled at MoMA/PS1 in New York. (Matt Shaw)

COSMO Being assembled at MoMA/PS1 in New York. (Matt Shaw)

Each year, the MoMA/PS1 Young Architect’s Program features an exciting design by an up-and-coming architect in the courtyard for the Warm-Up series. This year Madrid- and New York–based Andres Jaque and his Office for Political Innovation will build a huge, roving sprinkler system called COSMO that will surely liven up the event. However, it is different from years past: It will be built in Spain and shipped over by boat. Why?

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Munching on air pollutants: Would you eat these meringues made from the smog you breathe every day?

(Courtesy The Center for Genomic Gastronomy)

(Courtesy The Center for Genomic Gastronomy)

How do you coax city slickers to really take notice of air pollution? Start selling meringues, of course. At this year’s Ideas City festival in New York City, the Center for Genomic Gastronomy set up a “Smog Tasting” food cart introducing aeroir (a play on terroir for the atmospheric taste of place) meringues infused with recreated urban smog from four cities.

Continue reading after the jump.

With Foster rebuffed, Bjarke Ingels reveals his plans for a stepped Two World Trade Center

(Courtesy BIG)

(Courtesy DBOX/BIG)

In late 2005, Norman Foster unveiled his design for Two World Trade Center—an 88-story tower capped in four diamonds to direct the eye down toward the 9/11 Memorial, which, at the time, was still years from completion. Then, the World Trade Center site was still in the design phase, and Bjarke Ingels was a little-known architect from Denmark.

But a lot can change in a decade.

After years of delays, BKSK is set to revive this half-built luxury tower in New York’s artsy Noho district

(Courtesy BKSK)

(Courtesy BKSK)

With some financial maneuvering, the long-delayed construction site at 22 Bond Street in NoHo will finally see some action. For years, a 14-story super structure has been lurking at the coveted corner as a blatant reminder of a hotel project that went south. Now, with some refinancing, BKSK Architects will adapt the existing skeleton into an 11-story, block-through condo building.

Continue reading after the jump.

After redesigning Times Square, Snøhetta takes on crowded blocks around Penn Station

33rd Street outside Penn Station. (Flickr / Elvert Barnes)

33rd Street outside Penn Station. (Flickr / Elvert Barnes)

The frustratingly congested, obnoxiously loud, and aggressively dirty area around Penn Station is easily the worst part of Manhattan. It is the reason why tourists qualify their vacation stories about New York with “but I could never live there.” Turning the dreadful area around the station (let’s leave the hated station out of it for now) into a pleasant place where people want to spend time and not just push and shove their way through is a Herculean task, but one that Snøhetta has agreed to take on.

Continue reading after the jump.

The Frick Collection cancels controversial expansion plan by Davis Brody Bond

Frick Collection expansion plans. (Courtesy Davis Brody Bond.)

Frick Collection expansion plans. (Courtesy Davis Brody Bond)

The Frick Collection has called off its controversial expansion plan, reports the New York Times. The surprising news comes one year after the museum unveiled a scheme by David Brody Bond to build a six-story addition and fill in its beloved Russell Page Garden. Removing the garden (and replacing it with a new rooftop garden) did not sit well with preservationists who came out swinging against the expansion.

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Kohn Pedersen Fox’s One Vanderbilt now has all the approval it needs to climb 1,501 feet over Manhattan

One Vanderbilt. (Courtesy KPF)

One Vanderbilt. (Courtesy KPF)

In late May, the New York City Council unanimously voted in favor of a plan to upzone a five-block stretch of Vanderbilt Avenue next to Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan. The widely expected move gives developer SL Green the green light to start work on its 1,501-foot-tall office tower known as One Vanderbilt.

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Piece by piece, Watch as New York City’s first micro-unit housing complex by nArchitects takes shape

Rendering of Carmel Place. (Courtesy nARCHITECTS)

Rendering of Carmel Place. (Courtesy nARCHITECTS)

New York City‘s first-ever entirely micro-unit housing complex is being stacked together on Manhattan‘s East Side. Back in February, we wrote that the modules for the nARCHITECTS-designed building were being assembled at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, and now we can report that they have begun arriving at their permanent home in Kips Bay.

Watch the video after the jump.

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