On View> Glimmering light installation recalls the destroyed baronial towers of Bannerman’s Castle near New York City

Art, East, Lighting, On View, Preservation
Tuesday, August 4, 2015
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Photo_by_Rob_Penner-copy

(Rob Penner)

We head home: through the gloss of rain or weight
of snow, or the plum blush of dusk, but always—home, …
facing the stars
hope—a new constellation
waiting for us to map it,
waiting for us to name it—together.

—One Day, by Robert Blanco. Written for the second Inauguration of President Barack Obama, January 21, 2013.

Melissa McGill’s light-based public art project, Constellation, arises from the romantic ruins of Bannerman’s Castle on Pollepel Island, a mysterious sight glimpsed from trains heading north 50 miles from New York City just shy of Beacon, and nearby to West Point and Storm King. If you’ve ever wondered about this fleeting apparition, this art installation, which will be up for two years, is the perfect vehicle for visiting the island or gazing from the riverbank.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Students at RISD imagine how a climate change museum in New York City could reclaim a vulnerable site

(Courtesy Erin Graham, RISD)

(Courtesy Erin Graham, RISD)

James Hansen, one of the world’s preeminent climate scientists, has issued an alarming new paper about the impacts of climate change—and the findings are way worse than what anyone expected. According to Hansen and the team of 16 scientists he worked with, sea levels could rise up to 10 feet over the next 50 years. “Social disruption and economic consequences of such large sea level rise could be devastating,” conclude the scientists. “It is not difficult to imagine that conflicts arising from forced migrations and economic collapse might make the planet ungovernable, threatening the fabric of civilization.”

Continue reading after the jump.

This Saturday, a projection-mapped display will cover the Empire State Building to raise awareness about endangered species

Art, East, On View, Skyscrapers
Thursday, July 30, 2015
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As supertall residential towers reach new heights in Manhattan, the Empire State Building still stands strong in New York City‘s skyline—especially after dusk. The building’s crown is quintessential New York and a sky-high representation of holidays, anniversaries, and the day’s news in colorful light. On Saturday night, the Empire State Building will be used for even more.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Can the latest plan to salvage LaGuardia take flight? New York Governor Cuomo unveils ambitious $4 billion airport redesign scheme

(Courtesy Office of the Governor)

(Courtesy Office of the Governor)

For New Yorkers and visitors alike, LaGuardia Airport is a confusing maze of disconnected terminals. Beset with delays, chaotic transfers, poorly designed wayfinding, and congestion for both passengers and planes, the airport was recently, not undeservingly, characterized by Vice President Biden as feeling like a “third-world country.” Now the facility is slated to get a much-needed, and long overdue redesign. Governor Cuomo presented a far-reaching plan to overhaul the tired facility, which would cost roughly $4 billion, and be completed over a 5-year period.

Continue reading after the jump.

Here’s your first look at what Bjarke Ingels has planned for Harlem

(BIG)

(The Bjarke Ingels Group

Since setting up shop in New York, the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) has quickly become one of the most visible architecture firms in the city. It all started with the tetrahedron-shaped residential “courtscraper,” first called W57 and now dubbed Via, that is now nearing completion on 57th Street. And then there is BIG’s viewing platform at Brooklyn Bridge Park that has been likened to a Tostito. (That nickname has stuck, but the project’s funding has not.)

Now BIG’s building in Harlem.

How architects are building a “soil sandwich” to keep plants from cooking at Hudson Yards’ rail-yard-topping Public Square

The 7 train station and green space with the Public Square behind it. (Courtesy Related and Oxford)

The 7 train station and green space with the Public Square behind it. (Courtesy Related and Oxford)

Building America’s largest private real estate development in history would be a tricky proposition whether or not it was taking shape over an active rail yard in the middle of the densest city in the country. But, of course, that is exactly where Hudson Yards—the mega development with those superlative bragging rights—is taking shape.

Continue reading after the jump.

Here’s the massive water slide planned for New York City’s Summer Streets, when pedestrians take over Park Avenue

East, Urbanism
Friday, July 24, 2015
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(Courtesy NYC DOT)

(Courtesy NYC DOT)

In a blatant attempt to please fun-loving New Yorkers, the city’s Department of Transportation has announced that a massive Slip ‘N Slide will be part of this year’s Summer Streets program. The annual free event turns over Park Avenue, from the Brooklyn Bridge to Central Park, to pedestrians, cyclists, and now childhood attractions. Read More

Here’s how Morris Adjmi’s ghostly aluminum carbon copy of a warehouse in Tribeca is shaping up

(Courtesy Field Condition)

(Courtesy Field Condition)

On a prime Tribeca corner, Morris Adjmi has transformed an early 19th century coffee and tea warehouse into a fancy condo building—and built a mirror-image replica of the stately structure right next to it. Well, almost.

Continue reading after the jump.

See how Bjarke Ingels’ Two World Trade will impact New York’s skyline from five different sites

Two World Trade. (Courtesy DBOX and BIG)

Two World Trade. (Courtesy DBOX and BIG)

For Two World Trade Center, Bjarke Ingels has created a tower with multiple personalities. From the 9/11 Memorial, the building, with its seamless glass facade, appears like a somber glass giant huddled around the hallowed site with its peers. But from pretty much anywhere else, the building is quite expressive with a stepped massing scheme that appears like a stack of boxes, a ziggurat sliced in half, or a staircase for King King.

Read More

NYC DOT’s “Great Streets” vision for Atlantic Avenue lacks any bicycle infrastructure

New medians proposed for Atlantic Avenue. (Courtesy NYC DOT)

New medians proposed for Atlantic Avenue. (Courtesy NYC DOT)

As part of Mayor de Blasio’s mission to eliminate traffic deaths in New York City, his administration has committed $250 million toward its “Great Streets” initiative to redesign four of the city’s most dangerous arterial roadways: 4th Avenue in Brooklyn, Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn and Queens, Queens Boulevard, and  Grand Concourse in the Bronx.

Read More

Marvel Architects’ controversial library and condo development moves forward in Brooklyn

(Courtesy Marvel Architects)

(Courtesy Marvel Architects)

A controversial plan to boost the coffers of the financially-strapped Brooklyn Public Library system with the revenue from a new condo tower is moving forward.

Read More

Letter to the Editor> Meet the Street

The AIANY's Center for Architecture in Manhattan. (Courtesy Andrew Berman Architect)

The AIANY’s Center for Architecture in Manhattan. (Courtesy Andrew Berman Architect)

We saw your editorial on design organizations (“Design Organizations Need to Meet the Street”) and were thrilled to see the positive things you had to say about the Center for Architecture.

Read More

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