Bush Terminal Piers Park finally opens in Sunset Park, Brooklyn

Park Entrance. (Courtesy NYC Parks Department)

Park Entrance. (Courtesy NYC Parks Department)

Finally. After years and year of delays, Bush Terminal Piers Park in Sunset Park, Brooklyn is open. DNAinfo reported that the opening comes more than 10 years after people started talking about turning the brownfield site into a public space. The long-anticipated park includes a waterfront esplanade, wetlands, tidal ponds, lawns, and athletic fields designed by AECOM and Adrian Smith Landscape Architecture. There is also a comfort station by Turett Collaborative Architects.

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Meet Fleurt, New York’s most anticipated chair of the fall season

Behold, the Fleurt. (Courtesy Andrew Jones)

Behold, the Fleurt. (Courtesy Andrew Jones via NYC Parks and The Battery Conservancy)

Fleurt, the winning design for the Battery Conservancy America’s “Draw Up a Chair” competition, has been described as an “archetypal floral form” and even a “whimsical suggestion of sun-loving flowers floating in a field.” But it is much more than that. Fleurt “announces openness and photogenic warmth” and creates a “memorable, diaphanous landscape.” Fleurt “stretches out” with its “lounging curves.” Fleurt is, yes, fine, technically a chair.

Continue reading after the jump.

New York City allocates $5.8 million to stabilize Philip Johnson’s New York State Pavilion

The Tent of Tomorrow. (Henry Melcher / AN)

The Tent of Tomorrow. (Henry Melcher / AN)

After decaying for years, the New York State Pavilion from the 1964 World’s Fair is getting some TLC. The New York Times reported that $5.8 million was allocated in New York City’s budget to stabilize the Philip Johnson–designed pavilion in Queens.

More after the jump.

Grocery Store Tycoon John Catsimatidis Wants to Save Philip Johnson’s New York State Pavilion

Development, East, Preservation
Monday, March 31, 2014
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John Catsimatidis wants to save the NY State Pavilion. ( David Tan / Flickr)

John Catsimatidis wants to save the NY State Pavilion. ( David Tan / Flickr)

John Catsimatidis, the billionaire-grocery-store-tycoon-turned-failed-mayoral-candidate said he will write a check to save Philip Johnson’s iconic New York State Pavilion in Queens, New York. That is, if someone presents him with the right “visionary” plan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Temporary Installation in East Village Park is an “Urban Forest”

East
Thursday, June 13, 2013
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"Urban Forest" by Jieun Yang and Ji Young Kim. (Courtesy First Street Green)

Urban Forest by Jieun Yang and Ji Young Kim. (Courtesy First Street Green)

New York City-based artists and architects Jieun Yang and Ji Young Kim have secured a spot in First Park, located between East First and Houston Streets near Second Avenue, for a futuristic Urban Forest as part of the 2013 Public Summer installation program, overseen by contemporary architecture group SUPERFRONT. According to the group, “This program is sponsored every year by SUPERFRONT to provide an opportunity for young and emerging designers to produce a temporary installation in New York City while also fostering a community conversation about architecture and design.”

On May 19, SUPERFRONT in partnership with First Street Green hosted a competition to decide which artwork would occupy the space this summer. Although still awaiting approval from the Parks Department, the winning design will likely be installed from July through August and will be open to the public on the weekends.

Continue reading after the jump.

Parks & Relocation: NYC’s Adrian Benepe Bows Out to Veronica White

National
Monday, June 18, 2012
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Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe with Van Alen's Abby Hamlin and AN exec editor Bill Menking in January, 2011. (AN/Stoelker)

Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe with Van Alen's Abby Hamlin and AN exec editor Bill Menking in January, 2011. (AN/Stoelker)

With just a year and a half left of Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s tenure remaining, the first of his major appointees, New York City Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe, is moving on. Under Benepe, the Parks Department was transformed on a scale that approached the early tenure of Robert Moses. Since his appointment in 2002, the commissioner oversaw the largest expansion of waterfront parks like Brooklyn Bridge Park, embraced public-private partnerships as seen on the High Line, and distributed more than $250 million in Croton Water Filtration funds to small pocket parks throughout the Bronx.

Continue reading after the jump.

Quick Clicks> Icelandic Sculptures, Painted Trees, Carnegie, and Parklets

Daily Clicks
Thursday, March 24, 2011
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A sectional view of the BORDERS exhibition (courtesy New York City Department of Parks & Recreation, artist Steinunn Thórarinsdóttir, and photographer James Ewing)

Icelandic Borders. Today at 5PM, “the largest temporary public art exhibition… in New York City Parks history,” titled BORDERS, will be unveiled at Dag Hammarskjöld Plaza. The UN-conscious installation is a collaboration between the Parks Commissioner, an Icelandic Ambassador, and Icelandic artist Steinunn Thórarinsdóttir, consisting of 26 androgynous, life-size sculptures.

Painted Trees. Gerry Mak of Lost at E Minor adoringly shares the curious images of the vibrantly painted trees around Colorado by artist Curtis Killorn. Because of the unexpected colorings, these trees do not look like they came from land, but from the sea.

Green Carnegie. We were worried when gbNYC reported that the good ol’ Carnegie Hall is planning to undergo a massively ambitious, full-spectrum retrofit this year. But don’t worry, the architecture firm Iu + Bibliowicz, which is in charge of all this, swears to preserve “the building’s distinctive 19th-century architectural grace notes” while making dramatic green building improvements.

Parking to parkletting. The SF Examiner reports that more temporary public spaces, called
‘parklets,’ are exploding throughout San Francisco parking spots. The public battle between those who want to park cars and those who want to seat customers out on the sidewalk seems to have a clear winner– the Department of Public Works is stamping out countless approvals for businesses to have their own parklets despite complaints.

Digging into the Past of New York Parks

East
Wednesday, June 30, 2010
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Concrete Plant Park in the Bronx (Photo: Malcolm Pinckney)

Most New Yorkers have an intimate relationship with the city’s many parks, especially during summer months when public events transform our favorite green spaces into temporary yoga studios and music venues. It can be easy to forget the industrial past of these urban oases, or the planning work and earth-sculpting toil responsible for the conversion of reservoirs and jails into Bronx parks and West Village gardens. Before They Were Parks, an exhibition presented by the New York City Parks Department, narrates the often untold history of the city’s open spaces. Read More

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