NBBJ’s New Orleans hospital embodies resilience

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NBBJ designed UMC's entry pavilion to recall New Orleans' porch culture. (Sean Airhart)

NBBJ designed UMC’s entry pavilion to recall New Orleans’ porch culture. (Sean Airhart)

High performance and cultural relevance meet in concrete, metal, and steel mesh envelope.

For the stakeholders involved in building the new Rev. Avery C. Alexander Academic Research Hospital (also known as University Medical Center, or UMC) in downtown New Orleans, the project was about much more than replacing facilities damaged during Hurricane Katrina.

Continue reading after the jump.

The New & Old in New Orleans: Ten years after Katrina, architects still figuring out how to rebuild housing in the city

Architecture, Development, Southwest, Urbanism
Thursday, September 3, 2015
(Courtesy Make It Right Foundation)

(Courtesy Make It Right Foundation)

Ten years after Hurricane Katrina tore through the Gulf Coast region, inundating New Orleans with contaminated floodwaters, the city is in some ways still getting back on its feet. After much dispute on how to recover the city, architects and developers are looking to new construction and existing building stock for solutions.

Continue reading after the jump.

Here are the three finalists in the ULI’s 2015 New Orleans–focused Hines Competition

Claiborne Grove.

Claiborne Grove.

As AN recently reported, the Urban Land Institute recently named four finalist in its 2015 Hines Competition to reimagine the Tulane/Gravier and Iberville neighborhoods in New Orleans: two multidisciplinary teams from Harvard University, one from Maryland University, and a joint team representing the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

See the finalists after the jump.

On View> New Orleans’ neoclassical Gallier Hall washed in dynamic light for LUNA Fête

21st century technology animates an 18th century facade. (Courtesy Arts Council New Orleans)

21st century technology animates a 19th century facade. (Courtesy Arts Council New Orleans)

On November 30, the Arts Council New Orleans launched LUNA Fête, a large-scale, outdoor light and sound installation that can be experienced free by the public at Lafayette Square. The centerpiece of the event is a projection mapping display by French art group La Maison Productions that transforms the Crescent City’s former city hall (Gallier Hall, 1853) into a neoclassical canvas. The nine-minute animated work plays on the columns and contours of the Greek Revival edifice with a richly layered spectacle inspired by the music and cultural history of New Orleans.

Watch a video after the jump.

Pittsburgh, Washington, Buffalo lead nation in growth of bicycle commuters

Detroit's 2nd Avenue is the target of a substantial road diet that may include the Motor City's first buffered bike lanes. (Curbed Detroit)

Detroit’s 2nd Avenue is the target of a substantial road diet that may include the Motor City’s first buffered bike lanes. (Curbed Detroit)

Portland still dominates the American Community Survey ranking the 70 largest cities with the highest share of bike commuters, but the list shakes up some preconceptions when you count which cities had the largest growth in the share of bicycle commuters from 2000 to 2013. Read More

Greenbuild 2014 heads to New Orleans on October 22–24

Greenbuild 2010. (Charles & Hudson / Flickr)

Greenbuild 2010. (Charles & Hudson / Flickr)

Greenbuild 2014, the country’s largest conference and expo on sustainable building and design, will be held at the Morial Convention Center in New Orleans. This year’s conference, which runs from October 22–24, is themed “Leadership Jazz” and is expected to draw 23,000 attendees and 600 exhibitors from around the country.

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Van Alen Institute Launches Competition Seeking Land Reuse Strategies for New Orleans

(Courtesy Van Alen)

(Courtesy Van Alen)

Earlier this month, the Van Alen Institute announced Future Ground, an international design competition that is hoping to attract fresh strategies for reusing the many vacant lots that dot New Orleans. The competition is seeking submissions from landscape designers, architects, planners, public policy wonks, and pretty much anybody in the business of shaping urban environments and is supported by the New Orleans Redevelopment Authority (NORA), which owns more than 2,000 vacant lots.

There are somewhere around 30,000 empty lots and abandoned structures throughout New Orleans today, most of them left by Hurricane Katrina, which devastated the city in 2005. As the 10-year anniversary of the storm approaches, Future Ground is looking to create design and policy strategies capable of adapting to changes in density, demand, climate, and landscape in New Orleans over the next half-century in an effort to turn these abandoned landscapes into lasting resources.

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Before & After> Baton Rouge Proposes an Ambitious Greenway Overhaul



How the greenway might look as it passes through Expressway Park.


As AN reported in our latest Southwest edition, Baton Rouge and New Orleans are gearing up for changes across their respective urban landscapes with two new master plans by landscape architecture firm Spackman Mossop Michaels. The firm has shared these before and after views of the proposed Baton Rouge Greenway, which provides “a vision for a greenway that connects City-Brooks Park near LSU’s campus on the south side of the city to the State Capitol grounds to the north, while stitching together adjoining neighborhoods and other smaller landscaped areas along the way” Slide back and forth to see existing conditions and SMM’s plans for the area and be sure to learn more about the projects in AN‘s news article.

See more after the jump.

Ten Roads Whose Time Has Come: Congress for the New Urbanism Releases List of Freeways Ripe for Removal


Detroit's I-375 made the list.

Detroit’s I-375 made the list. (gab482/flickr)

The Congress for the New Urbanism has released their annual list of Freeways Without Futures. The organization selected the top 10 urban American (and one Canadian) highways most in need of removal. The final list was culled from nominations from more than 50 cities. Criteria for inclusion included age of the freeway, the potential that removal would have to positively effect the areas where the roadways are currently situated, and the amount of momentum to realize such removals. Additionally the CNU highlighted campaigns in Dallas, the Bronx, Pasadena, Buffalo, and Niagra Falls, that are taking significant steps towards removing freeways (some of which have been included in past lists) as illustrations of broader institutional and political shifts on urban infrastructural thinking.

The dubious list after the jump.

Pittfalls in New Orleans: Brad Pitt’s “Make It Right” Houses Need Repair

Architecture, News, Newsletter, Southwest
Tuesday, January 14, 2014
(Muskegon Habitat/Flickr)

(Muskegon Habitat/Flickr)

The houses built by Brad Pitt’s charitable organization, Make it Right, in the wake of Hurricane Katrina are already in need of refurbishing. The foundation is part of an effort to restore New Orleans‘ 9th Ward through the construction of 150 architect-designed homes featuring modern design, but the timber used on the exteriors of many of the homes is proving no match for the area’s moisture and is beginning to rot.  The charity has said it will work with their provider TimberSIL to solve the problems with the rapidly decaying wood.

More Brad

New Orleans Unveils Urban Water Plan That Embraces Flooding

City Terrain, Southwest
Wednesday, September 18, 2013


On September 9th, New Orleans unveiled an innovative proposal for flood management: the New Orleans Greater Water Plan. Designed by Dutch engineers and led by chief architect and planner David Waggonner of locally-based firm Waggonner & Ball Architects, the plan seeks to mitigate the damages caused during heavy rainfalls. The concept is simple: keeping water in pumps and canals instead of draining and pumping it out. The idea is to retain the water in order to increase the city’s groundwater, thereby slowing down the subsidence of soft land as it dries and shrinks.

Continue reading after the jump.

Cesar Pelli To Overhaul New Orleans’ Louis Armstrong International Airport

Newsletter, Southwest
Tuesday, August 27, 2013
1960 Aerial View of Louis Armstrong Airport (Courtesy of Louis Armstrong International Airport)

1960 Aerial View of Louis Armstrong Airport (Courtesy of Louis Armstrong International Airport)

With terminals at Washington D.C.’s Ronald Reagan International Airport and the Tokyo Haneda Airport under his belt (among several other transportation hubs), Cesar Pelli is no stranger to the challenges of designing airports. The New Orleans Times-Picayune reported that the Argentinian-born architect, who assisted Earo Saarinen on the iconic TWA terminal early in his career, will now collaborate with two New Orleans–based firms, Manning Architects and Hewitt Washington Architects, to redesign the Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport to coincide with the city’s 300th anniversary in 2018.

Continue reading after the jump.

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