MoMA Taps Pedro Gadanho as Curator of Contemporary Architecture

International, Shft+Alt+Del
Thursday, December 22, 2011
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Pedro Gandanho (David Farran/Courtesy MoMA).

Pedro Gadanho (David Farran/Courtesy MoMA).

The Museum of Modern Art has confirmed that the Portuguese architect, curator, and writer Pedro Gadanho will join  MoMA’s Department of Architecture and Design as a curator of contemporary architecture.

According to MoMA’s release: “In his new role, Mr. Gadanho will be responsible for a broad portfolio that reinforces the Museum’s commitment, since 1932, to contemporary architecture. In addition to building the Museum’s holdings of contemporary architecture, he will oversee the annual Young Architects Program (YAP), co-organized with MoMA PS1, and the two-year-old YAP International Program in conjunction with the MAXXI in Rome and Constructo in Santiago, Chile; organize further exhibitions in the Museum’s “Issues in Contemporary Architecture” series; and develop larger scale exhibitions of contemporary architecture, including exhibitions that explore relationships between architecture and other contemporary art practices.”

Continue reading after the jump.

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On View> Talk to Me at MoMA

East
Monday, August 8, 2011
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Hello World!, Bernhard Hopfengärtner (Courtesy MoMA)

Hello World!, Bernhard Hopfengärtner (Courtesy MoMA)

Talk to Me
Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd St.
Through November 7

Talk to Me explores the subject of communication between people and their environment, highlighting the role of the designer in imagining and establishing these connections. Through a diverse selection of objects and conceptual work, the exhibition examines designs that engage users, including information systems, visualization design, communication devices, and interfaces, like the QR code mowed into a field in Bernhard Hopfengärtner’s project Hello World!, above.

Continue reading after the jump.

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On View> 194X–9/11: American Architects and the City

East
Tuesday, July 12, 2011
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Mies van der Rohe's Museum for a Small City Project, 1942 (Courtesy MoMA)

Mies van der Rohe's Museum for a Small City Project, 1942 (Courtesy MoMA)

194X–9/11: American Architects and the City
The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd St.
Through January 2

Prompted by the United States’ entrance into World War II in 1942, Architectural Forum magazine commissioned pioneering architects to imagine and plan a postwar American city. At the tenth anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, 194X-9/11: American Architects and the City features the plans, renderings, and sculpture of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Louis Kahn, Paul Rudolph, and Rem Koolhaas and their ideas for cities of the future. Rarely displayed works, such as Mies van der Rohe’s collage Museum for a Small City Project (1942), above, reveal plans for cultural centers and urban life in uncertain times.

QUICK CLICKS> Altophobia, Old Archphobia, Parkphobia, Sunset

Daily Clicks
Tuesday, May 31, 2011
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Scared of heights? Courtesy NYTimes/Rothstein

High up. The New York TimesEdward Rothstein went out on a ledge for the paper today. The critic took on the glass boxes that protrude from the Willis Tower in Chicago known appropriately as the Ledge. The critic waxes poetic about the vulnerability of the city and the fully human sensations that occur when floating some 1,353 feet above the street. He also takes the opportunity to point out the redundancy of the Ledge’s cousin, the Grand Canyon Skywalk.

Tear Down. Christopher Hawthorne balked at SFMOMA‘s public relations campaign to portray the museum’s new Snøhetta-designed wing as a wallflower respecting its Mario Botta-designed neighbor. But as Hawthorne points out in the LA Times, the new building is anything but quiet. Rather it’s more a “chiseled behemoth.”  Hawthorne finds the museum’s affront to its Botta as part of a larger trend in the American museum world where the tendency is to drop good, but alas, old architecture in lieu of ever newer names and trends. Read: Whitney, MoMA, Barnes, to name but a few.

Put a Lid on It. In a totally biased and unabashedly opinionated piece for City Watch, Jack Humphreville writes that a back room deal may have LA ratepayers of the Department of Water and Power footing the bill for a new twelve-acre park designed to cap the underground reservoir replacing the Elysian Reservoir. Humprhies argues that the $85 million park should fall under the auspices of the City and the Department of Recreation and Parks.

Manhattanhenge. Gothamist reminds us that tonight at 8:17PM the full sun will set in perfect alignment with east west axis of Manhattan’s street grid. Remember not to stare, mesmerized, for too long.

 

 

 

Folks Weigh In On the Future of the Folk Art Museum

East
Friday, May 13, 2011
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American Folk Art Museum (Photo by Michael Moran)

American Folk Art Museum (Photo by Michael Moran)

Apparently the art world hates the American Folk Art Museum building! (Who knew?!) In the wake of the news that MoMA is buying the Todd Williams Billie Tsien-designed building, two of the art world’s more prominent voices both bashed the building and argued it hastened the Folk Art Museum’s decline. The esteemed Times critic Roberta Smith called it “unwelcoming” and argued that the museum’s fate was sealed by “lackluster, visionless leadership; the weak economy; and inappropriate architecture.” Smith’s husband happens to be Jerry Saltz, the pugnacious art critic for New York, who went much further in a piece titled, “Architecture Killed the American Folk Art Museum.” He called the building, “ugly and confining, it was also all but useless for showing art.”

Not everyone agrees!

Continue reading after the jump.

MoMA To Go House Hunting in the Burbs

National
Monday, April 25, 2011
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(Courtesy The Washington Independent)

The foreclosure crisis has up-ended old assumptions about the relative prosperity of cities versus suburbs. In many regions waves of foreclosures have hit the suburbs hardest. In the second iteration of their “Issues in Contemporary Architecture” residency and exhibition series, MoMA and P.S. 1 will ask five teams to design interventions for five “megaregions” facing high levels of foreclosures. Like the earlier iteration, Rising Currents, the new project, Foreclosed: Rehousing the American Dream will include a residency and public workshops at P.S. 1, followed by an exhibition and public programs at MoMA. Organized by Barry Bergdoll, chief curator for architecture and design, and Reinhold Martin, director of the Buell Center at Columbia, Foreclosed “will enlist five interdisciplinary teams of architects to envision a rethinking of housing and related infrastructures that could catalyze urban transformation, particularly in the country’s suburbs,” according to a statement from the museum.

Continue reading after the jump.

Antonelli Talks To Me: Upcoming Design Show at MoMA

East
Friday, February 25, 2011
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WiFi Divining Rod by Designer Michael Thompson

Senior curator in MoMA’s department of architecture and design, Paola Antonelli is also a verb. She said so herself in describing her approach to curating, in general, and particularly preparing for her upcoming summer show, Talk to Me, opening on July 24. Read More

MoMA/P.S. 1 Young Architects Program Winner Announced

East, International, Newsletter
Wednesday, February 16, 2011
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Interboro's design for MoMA P.S.1 (Courtesy Interboro)

Interboro’s design for MoMA P.S.1 (Courtesy Interboro)

P.S. 1 and the Museum of Modern Art have just announced that Brooklyn-based urban design and planning firm Interboro Partners are the winners of the 2011 Young Architects Program. Now celebrating its 12th year, the honor means designing what by now is widely recognized as the liveliest party space of the summer, the outdoor plaza of P.S. 1 in Queens.

Read more after the jump.

Quick Clicks> He′s Back, Pay Up, On Fire, Sale!

Daily Clicks, East
Friday, January 28, 2011
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Rahm Emanuel is on track for election. (Courtesy chicagoforrahm.com)

Rahm Emanuel is on track for election. (Courtesy chicagoforrahm.com)

On Track. The mayor of Chicago holds sway in a big way. That’s why we’re keeping an eye on the ballot, and, as of today, Rahm Emanuel is back in business, reports The Chicago Tribune. Emanuel has stated that one of his first priorities is to expand Chicago Transportation Authority’s Red Line.

Read More

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MoMA′s Young Architects Program Heading to Rome

International
Thursday, December 23, 2010
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Zaha Hadid's MAXXI in Rome (Courtesy Museo Nazionale Delle Arti Del XXI Secolo)

Zaha Hadid's MAXXI in Rome (Courtesy Museo Nazionale Delle Arti Del XXI Secolo)

The prestigious Young Architects Program put on by the Museum of Modern Art and MoMA P.S.1 in New York has announced that it’s teaming up with Rome’s National Museum of 21st Century Arts, or MAXXI, to host a second outdoor installation at the new Zaha Hadid museum.
Read more: Officials hope for a local feel as finalists are announced.

Nouvel Sanguine About Midtown Guillotine

East
Tuesday, October 19, 2010
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Jean Nouvel (CBS News)

Jean Nouvel optimistic despite MoMA Tower’s shortened stature (CBS News)

Jean Nouvel feels like his MoMA Tower has been put under the guillotine.  The starchitect behind the lopped-off Midtown Manhattan proposal told CBS News this weekend that “It’s very French to cut the head, eh?”  His 75-story tower would have rivaled the Empire State Building for supremacy over the New York skyline, standing 1,250 feet tall, but met significant opposition from neighbors worried the tower would drown their street in shadow.

City Planning Commission officials voted earlier this year to allow a shortened version of the tower – chopping off 200 feet of the Pritzker Prize winner’s design.  Nouvel’s vision has been sent back to the drawing boards, but he says it’s “not in his character” to feel discouraged.  Be sure to check out AN‘s cameo appearance at the end of the interview.

Watch the interview after the jump.

Two Routes to Poster Art

East
Wednesday, August 4, 2010
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John Hassall, No need to ask a P’liceman, 1908, lithograph, London Transport Museum, © TfL from the London Transport Museum Collection

Well, this is embarrassing: the MoMA and the Yale Center for British Art have nearly simultaneously come out with exhibitions on the same subject. In museum-world, isn’t that like two girls showing up to a party in the same dress?

Nevertheless, it’s an interesting enough topic that the repetition hardly matters. The Yale Center’s “Art For All: British Posters For Transport,” on view through August 15, and the MoMA’s “Underground Gallery: London Transport Posters 1920s-1940s,” on view through February 28, 2011, both offer a fascinating look at London’s innovative campaign to bring art into the Underground and create a strong civic identity. Read More

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