Rojkind Arquitectos designs jagged waterfront concert hall to boost Mexico’s reputation as a music and cultural hub

(Courtesy Rojkind Arquitectos)

(Courtesy Rojkind Arquitectos)

Capitalizing on the recent rise of Boca del Rio’s cultural profile, construction has begun on a new waterfront concert hall in Veracruz, Mexico. The Foro Boca will house the Boca del Rio Philharmonic Orchestra, formed last year to incite interest in the region as a cultural and musical center, and kickstart a masterplan to regenerate the local architecture.

Continue reading after the jump.

Brooks + Scarpa’s Double-Skinned Research Center

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Brooks + Scarpa designed a "showpiece" research and testing center for Metalsa in Monterrey, Mexico. (John Linden)

Brooks + Scarpa designed a “showpiece” research and testing center for Metalsa in Monterrey, Mexico. (John Linden)

Perforated steel and translucent glass balance privacy and pop.

For their Center for Manufacturing Innovation (CMI) in Monterrey, Mexico, Metalsa, a global manufacturing firm that specializes in automobile and truck chassis, did not want just another factory. Read More

Painting Palmitas: Artists in Mexico cover an entire hillside village in one enormous psychedelic mural

(Courtesy Germen Crew)

(Courtesy Germen Crew)

Pachuca, Mexico is hoping a psychedelic mural can cement the transformation of a once crime-stricken neighborhood to a safer, more unified community. The government-sponsored urban renewal project, called El Macro Mural Barrio de Palmitas, coated over 200 hillside dwellings in a vibrant layer of paint with striking results.

Continue reading after the jump.

Enrique Norten unveils expansion plans for Mexico City’s design & film school, Centro

(Courtesy TEN Arquitectos)

(Courtesy TEN Arquitectos)

Centro, a Mexico City–based design and film school, has just announced that Enrique Norten of TEN Arquitectos has been chosen to design a new expansion to its existing campus.

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Facades pro Michel Rojkind on value-added building envelopes

Rojkind Arquitectos and Zahner crafted a new stainless steel facade for Liverpool department store in Mexico City. (Jaime Navarro)

Rojkind Arquitectos’ Liverpool Insurgentes department store. (Jaime Navarro)

Known for their playful, cutting-edge facades, Rojkind Arquitectos are adept at transforming obstacles into opportunity.

Continue reading after the jump.

If swoopy renderings weren’t enough, now you can fly through Zaha Hadid’s first project in Mexico

Esfera City Center. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

Esfera City Center. (Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

In mid-May, AN wrote about Zaha Hadid‘s first project in Mexico—a sprawling, 981-unit housing complex in Monterrey. The Esfera City Center development appears as a series of interconnected, almost pixelated, mid-rise residential buildings that are centered around a communal green space. And now it has a slick video rendering that sheds new light on the project’s design.

Watch the video after the jump.

On View> Mexico City installation puts architecture on the sidewalk

Jardineira at LIGA by TACOA Arquitetos, Mexico City (Luis Gallardo, LGM Studio).

Jardineira at LIGA by TACOA Arquitetos, Mexico City
(Luis Gallardo, LGM Studio).

Leave it to a pair of Brazilian architects to use reinforced concrete to reinvent small-scale urbanism. While North American designers turn to plywood and recycled palettes to create curbside seating, architects Fernando Falcón and Rodrigo Cerviño of the São Paulo–based practice TACOA Arquitetos shopped for rebar.

Continue reading after the jump.

Zaha Hadid swoops into Monterrey with a pixelated housing complex, her first design in Mexico

Esfera City Center in Monterrey is Zaha Hadid Architects' first project in Mexico. Image courtesy ZHA.

Esfera City Center in Monterrey is Zaha Hadid Architects’ first project in Mexico. Image courtesy ZHA.

Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) has unveiled the design for its first building in Mexico, a 981 unit, mid-rise housing project in Monterrey. The original brief called for 12 towers, but ZHA proposed the alternative plan that includes a large open green space surrounded by three buildings in a rectangle.

See more after the jump.

The New Guard: The Architectural League of New York announces its 2015 Emerging Voices

Levering Trade by Mexico's Atelier ARS (photo: Daniel Maldonado)

Levering Trade by Mexico’s Atelier ARS. (Daniel Maldonado)

The Architectural League‘s Emerging Voices lecture series, now in its 30th year, has reliably identified important new talent through a juried selection process. This year’s group reflects a number of important currents in contemporary practice in North America.

Check out the winners after the jump.

On View> Moderno: Design for Living in Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela, 1940-1978

Architecture, Design, East, On View
Thursday, January 29, 2015
.
(Courtesy Americas Society)

(Courtesy Americas Society)

When Miguel Arroyo arrived in New York City in 1939 as the assistant of the Venezuelan painter Luis Alfredo López Méndez, he met the architect of the Venezuelan Pavilion at New York’s World’s Fair: a young Gordon Bunshaft at SOM. The two formed a lifelong friendship.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Saturday> Architect Frida Escobedo in conversation with Beatrice Galilee at the Swiss Institute

Frida Escobedo.

Frida Escobedo.

Mexico has a unique architectural and artistic culture that spans generations and decades. It’s is a combination of a powerful indigenous vernacular created when the Spanish met the native peoples, sophisticated European designers immigrating to the country, and a long period when it was cut off from the international flow of capital and ideas. But now a new generation of young architects is redefining this tradition in the most creative and exciting ways. One of those young designers—Frida Escobedo—is in New York and will be presenting her work at the Swiss Institute on Saturday.

Read More

Unveiled> Norman Foster & Fernando Romero team up to design Mexico City’s new $9.2 billion airport

Mexico City's new airport will aim for a light environmental footprint through natural ventilation and a massive central hub. (foster + partners / FR-EE)

Mexico City’s new airport will aim for a light environmental footprint through natural ventilation and a massive central hub. (foster + partners / FR-EE)

A new international airport for Mexico City won’t just fix the problems of its predecessor—which typically delays planes because the two runways were built too close together—it will be unique in its efficient expansive single enclosure, according to its architects, Foster + Partners and FR-EE.

Read More

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