New York City to remove 96 sites from landmark consideration

The Pepsi-Cola sign in Long Island City would be "de-calendared by the Landmarks Preservation Commission.

This Pepsi-Cola sign in Queens would be “de-calendared” by the Landmarks Preservation Commission. (Flickr / Whiskeygonebad).

In an effort to supposedly streamline New York City’s landmarking process, the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) will drop 96 buildings and sites from consideration for historic preservation. These sites span all five boroughs and include Union Square, Greenwood Cemetery in Brooklyn, and the Pepsi-Cola sign in Long Island City (above).

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Collective-LOK’s stunning Van Alen storefront to open next week in New York City

Architecture, East, Interiors, News, Newsletter
Thursday, December 4, 2014
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The Van Alen Institute's new street-level space. (Courtesy Cameron Blaylock)

The Van Alen Institute’s new street-level space. (Courtesy Cameron Blaylock)

To commemorate its 120th anniversary, the Van Alen Institute is opening a new street-level space in New York City next Tuesday. The space, designed by Collective–LOK and located at 30 West 22nd Street, functions as a programming hub, event space, and gallery. Collective–LOK is a collaboration between Jon Lott (PARA-Project), William O’Brien Jr. (WOJR), and Michael Kubo (over,under). The team’s proposal, called “Screen Play,” won the Institute’s  2013 Ground/Work competition, which received over 120 design submissions.

Continue reading after the jump.

Here’s how Santiago Calatrava’s New York City transit hub got its enormous $4 billion price tag

Architecture, Development, East
Wednesday, December 3, 2014
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Final rafter being installed on the Hub's Oculus. (Courtesy Port Authority)

Final rafter being installed on the Hub’s Oculus. (Courtesy Port Authority)

With the final rafter installed on Santiago Calatrava’s World Trade Center Transit Hub the New York Times has done a deep-dive on how, exactly, the long-delayed structure ended up costing close to $4 billion. While the hub ultimately looks more like a stegosaurus than a dove taking flight, as Calatrava originally envisioned, it is undeniably a head-turning piece of dramatic architecture. But one that will be forever grounded by the reality of its staggering price tag.

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In Construction> Herzog & de Meuron’s 56 Leonard

56 Leonard. (Courtesy Field Condition)

56 Leonard. (Courtesy Field Condition)

It’s impossible to look at renderings of Herzog & de Meuron’s 56 Leonard and not immediately think of Jenga, the game guaranteed to shame one unlucky partygoer for pulling the wrong piece and ruining everyone’s fun. Good times! Anyway, back to 56 Leonard in New York City—the 60-story, glassy version of that nerve-wracking game.

Continue reading after the jump.

Kimmelman says “flawed” One World Trade is a “cautionary tale”

One World Trade. (Flickr/ gigi_nyc)

One World Trade. (Flickr/ gigi_nyc)

New York Times architecture critic Michael Kimmelman has weighed-in on 1 World TradeNew York‘s tallest,most superlative, open-but-not-yet-completed skyscraper. And, spoiler, he is no fan. Kimmelman’s piece is so chock-full of quotable critiques, it’s hard to decide where exactly to begin. But let’s start with the politics.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Window Shopping: Clouds Architecture Office washes American Standard in visual patterns

Architecture, Art, Design, East, Product
Tuesday, November 25, 2014
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IMG_6924

(Courtesy Garrett Rowland)

Clouds Architecture Office has created an evanescent installation for the DXV by American Standard showroom. Titled Unseen Expression, the project continues the New York–based firm’s study of the relationship between form and vision.

Check out more photos after the jump.

New York City to get 10,000 free public Wi-Fi portals

A link in the Flatiron District. (Courtesy CityBridge)

A link in the Flatiron District. (Courtesy CityBridge)

New York City is a city like no other. It’s lousy with things to see: architectural icons, world-famous parks, A-list celebrities, pigeons, food carts, and pigeons eating off of food carts. With so many sites, it’s a real bummer that so many New Yorkers walk around the city staring directly into the hollow glow of their phones. This isn’t going to change anytime soon, especially with the de Blasio administration announcing that, starting next year, the city’s dated payphone system will become “the world’s fastest municipal Wi-Fi network.”

Continue reading after the jump.

New renderings and details of SHoP’s supertall Midtown tower

The facade and skyline. (Courtesy SHoP via 6sqft)

The facade and skyline. (Courtesy SHoP & JDS Development Group via 6sqft)

Despite concerns that New York City’s high-end housing bubble is about to burst, the supertall towers that have come to symbolize that upper-echelon of the market keep coming, one after the other. Now, with One57 open, and 432 Park topped off, SHoP’s 111 W. 57th Street—widely seen as the most attractive of the bunch—is preparing to head skyward. As the tower begins its roughly 1,400-foot climb, new renderings and details of the project have surfaced.

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Tonight> Come see four proposals to redesign Manhattan’s 42nd Street for light rail

Awards, East, Transportation, Urbanism
Tuesday, November 18, 2014
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(Courtesy Vision42design)

(Courtesy Vision42design)

Tonight is the opening night of the New York City exhibition that features the four finalists in the vision42design competition. The international competition was launched in April of this year, and asked designers to reimagine Manhattan’s 42nd Street as an auto-free, light-rail thoroughfare that could serve as a model for a 21st century transportation corridor. The four winning proposals will be on display through January 15 starting tonight at the Condé Nast building at 4 Times Square. Come by for a cocktail reception beginning at 6:00p.m. Hope to see you there.

On View> Michael Graves: Past As Prologue

Architecture, Art, East, Newsletter, On View
Monday, November 17, 2014
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Denver-Central-Library-Ken-Ek-copy

Michael Graves, Denver Library, South Elevation, 1994. (Courtesy of Michael Graves & Associates)

Michael Graves: Past As Prologue
Grounds for Sculpture
19 Fairgrounds Road, Hamilton, NJ
Through April 5, 2015

Celebrating 50 years of practice in art, architecture, and design, Michael Graves is the subject of a pair of exhibitions and an upcoming symposium at the Architectural League of New York. The largest of the shows is Past is Prologue, at Grounds for Sculpture in Hamilton, New Jersey. It presents lesser-known early works from the mid-1960s, his blockbuster works from the 1980s, to his current work, which ranges from architecture, to product design, to leading edge-work on accessibility issues.

Continue reading after the jump.

How Stella Tower Got Its Glory Back

Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
JDS Development Group and Property Markets Group's renovation of Ralph Walker-designed Stella Tower included restoring the Art Deco crown. (Courtesy JDS Development Group)

JDS Development Group and Property Markets Group’s renovation of Ralph Walker-designed Stella Tower included restoring the Art Deco crown. (Courtesy JDS Development Group)

Developers use cutting-edge technology to restore Ralph Walker crown.

When JDS Development Group and Property Markets Group purchased the 1927 Ralph Walker high-rise in Manhattan’s Hell’s Kitchen neighborhood in order to transform it into the Stella Tower condominiums, they realized that something was not quite right about the roofline. “The building had a very odd, plain parapet of mismatched brick,” recalled JDS founder Michael Stern. “We were curious about why it had this funny detail that didn’t belong to the building.” The developers tracked down old photographs of the property and were pleasantly surprised by what they saw: an intricate Art Deco thin dome crown. “We were very intrigued by putting the glory back on top of the building,” said Stern. They proceeded to do just that, deploying a combination of archival research and modern-day technology to recreate a remarkable early-twentieth-century ornament.

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Window washers dangling from One World Trade Center rescued

East, News, Skyscrapers
Wednesday, November 12, 2014
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Secure window washers working at 1 World Trade Center on the north side—not where the accident happened. (Courtesy AN)

Secure window washers working at 1 World Trade Center on the north side—not where the accident happened. (Courtesy AN)

Firetrucks, police cars, and a helicopter surrounded 1 World Trade Center this afternoon to save two window washers who became trapped near the 69th floor on the south side of the building. According to the New York Times, the machine controlling the scaffolding, to which the washers were strapped, malfunctioned. Firefighters were able to reach them by cutting a hole in a nearby window and then bringing them to safety.  An official from the fire department said he believed the cause of the scaffolding failure was a snapped cable.

“They are in a difficult spot,” a fire department spokesman told the Wall Street Journal. “They are feeling the effects of hanging in there.”

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