New renderings and details of SHoP’s supertall Midtown tower

The facade and skyline. (Courtesy SHoP via 6sqft)

The facade and skyline. (Courtesy SHoP & JDS Development Group via 6sqft)

Despite concerns that New York City’s high-end housing bubble is about to burst, the supertall towers that have come to symbolize that upper-echelon of the market keep coming, one after the other. Now, with One57 open, and 432 Park topped off, SHoP’s 111 W. 57th Street—widely seen as the most attractive of the bunch—is preparing to head skyward. As the tower begins its roughly 1,400-foot climb, new renderings and details of the project have surfaced.

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Tonight> Come see four proposals to redesign Manhattan’s 42nd Street for light rail

Awards, East, Transportation, Urbanism
Tuesday, November 18, 2014
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(Courtesy Vision42design)

(Courtesy Vision42design)

Tonight is the opening night of the New York City exhibition that features the four finalists in the vision42design competition. The international competition was launched in April of this year, and asked designers to reimagine Manhattan’s 42nd Street as an auto-free, light-rail thoroughfare that could serve as a model for a 21st century transportation corridor. The four winning proposals will be on display through January 15 starting tonight at the Condé Nast building at 4 Times Square. Come by for a cocktail reception beginning at 6:00p.m. Hope to see you there.

On View> Michael Graves: Past As Prologue

Architecture, Art, East, Newsletter, On View
Monday, November 17, 2014
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Denver-Central-Library-Ken-Ek-copy

Michael Graves, Denver Library, South Elevation, 1994. (Courtesy of Michael Graves & Associates)

Michael Graves: Past As Prologue
Grounds for Sculpture
19 Fairgrounds Road, Hamilton, NJ
Through April 5, 2015

Celebrating 50 years of practice in art, architecture, and design, Michael Graves is the subject of a pair of exhibitions and an upcoming symposium at the Architectural League of New York. The largest of the shows is Past is Prologue, at Grounds for Sculpture in Hamilton, New Jersey. It presents lesser-known early works from the mid-1960s, his blockbuster works from the 1980s, to his current work, which ranges from architecture, to product design, to leading edge-work on accessibility issues.

Continue reading after the jump.

How Stella Tower Got Its Glory Back

Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
JDS Development Group and Property Markets Group's renovation of Ralph Walker-designed Stella Tower included restoring the Art Deco crown. (Courtesy JDS Development Group)

JDS Development Group and Property Markets Group’s renovation of Ralph Walker-designed Stella Tower included restoring the Art Deco crown. (Courtesy JDS Development Group)

Developers use cutting-edge technology to restore Ralph Walker crown.

When JDS Development Group and Property Markets Group purchased the 1927 Ralph Walker high-rise in Manhattan’s Hell’s Kitchen neighborhood in order to transform it into the Stella Tower condominiums, they realized that something was not quite right about the roofline. “The building had a very odd, plain parapet of mismatched brick,” recalled JDS founder Michael Stern. “We were curious about why it had this funny detail that didn’t belong to the building.” The developers tracked down old photographs of the property and were pleasantly surprised by what they saw: an intricate Art Deco thin dome crown. “We were very intrigued by putting the glory back on top of the building,” said Stern. They proceeded to do just that, deploying a combination of archival research and modern-day technology to recreate a remarkable early-twentieth-century ornament.

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Window washers dangling from One World Trade Center rescued

East, News, Skyscrapers
Wednesday, November 12, 2014
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Secure window washers working at 1 World Trade Center on the north side—not where the accident happened. (Courtesy AN)

Secure window washers working at 1 World Trade Center on the north side—not where the accident happened. (Courtesy AN)

Firetrucks, police cars, and a helicopter surrounded 1 World Trade Center this afternoon to save two window washers who became trapped near the 69th floor on the south side of the building. According to the New York Times, the machine controlling the scaffolding, to which the washers were strapped, malfunctioned. Firefighters were able to reach them by cutting a hole in a nearby window and then bringing them to safety.  An official from the fire department said he believed the cause of the scaffolding failure was a snapped cable.

“They are in a difficult spot,” a fire department spokesman told the Wall Street Journal. “They are feeling the effects of hanging in there.”

In Construction> Bjarke Ingels’ “court-scraper” tops out on 57th Street

BIG's W57. (Courtesy Field Condition)

BIG’s W57. (Courtesy Field Condition)

When we talk about the batch of luxury towers coming to 57th Street, we’re typically talking about very tall, very skinny, very glassy buildings. But not, of course, when it comes to W57—Bjarke Ingels‘ very pyramid-y addition to the street he calls a “court-scraper” for its combination of the European courtyard building with a New York skyscraper. Last time we checked in on Bjarke’s pyramid—sorry, Durst would prefer we all call it a “tetrahedron”—it was only a few stories high. That was back in June, and since then, the sure-looks-like-a-pyramid has topped out at 450 feet and crews have begun installing its facade.

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Archtober Building of the Day #31> Starlight at the Museum of the City of New York

Architecture, East
Monday, November 3, 2014
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(Berit Hoff)

Archtober Building of the Day #31
Starlight at the Museum of the City of New York
1220 Fifth Avenue
Cooper Joseph Studio

Starlight, the aptly named chandelier in the neo-Georgian rotunda of the Museum of the City of New York, was a marvelous termination to our fourth Archtober. Wendy Evans Joseph, principal at Cooper Joseph Studio, described the light fixture with meticulousness equal to the design itself.

Continue reading after the jump.

Archtober Building of the Day #28> Snøhetta’s Times Square Reconstruction

Architecture, East
Wednesday, October 29, 2014
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(Courtesy Center for Architecture)

Archtober Building of the Day #28
Times Square Reconstruction
Broadway and Seventh Avenue (West 42nd to West 47th Streets)
Snøhetta

“Looking for calm within the chaos,” was how Nick Koster of Snøhetta, described the firm’s design for the Times Square Reconstruction. Just then a topless woman dressed as a super hero sashayed past the Archtober tour group, which contained about a dozen school children.

Continue reading after the jump.

Archtober Building of the Day #23> NYU School of Professional Studies

Architecture, East
Monday, October 27, 2014
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(Melody Fernandez)

Archtober Building of the Day #23
NYU School of Professional Studies
7 East 12th Street
Mitchell | Giurgola Architects, LLP

A rainy day did not deter Archtober, and the hardy were amply rewarded with an up-to-the-minute view of an urban university hard at work. I want to change the name to “multi-versity” to capture the many different functions, schools, demographics, studies, and programs that the ever expanding universe of NYU now comprises. A recent addition is the newly renamed School of Professional Studies on 12th Street. Carol Loewenson and Stephen Dietz of Mitchell-Giurgola Architects, led the tour of the renovated Fairchild Printing Building. Projects like these—complex renovations where some operations must be maintained in place—require the steady, strong leadership of architects who find the puzzle of programmatic problem solving the bread and butter of successful practice.

Continue reading after the jump.

Archtober Building of the Day #22> Jacob K. Javits Convention Center

Architecture, East
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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(Courtesy Center for Architecture)

Archtober Building of the Day #22
Jacob K. Javits Convention Center
655 West 34th Street
FXFOWLE Epstein

Designed by Pei Cobb in the early 1980s, the Jacob K. Javits Center had fallen into a considerable slump in the years following its debut. Plagued with structural problems, today’s Archtober tour leader and head of the building’s extensive overhaul, Bruce Fowle, began in the center’s Crystal Palace by showing photos of the space before his firm’s massive undertaking. He highlighted two of the worst features of the original structure—the dirty, impossible-to-clean glass and extensive water damage. Almost immediately after opening, large canvas “diapers” were constructed to catch the ever-leaking roof, costing the center nearly one million dollars a year to alleviate the constant influx of water.

Continue reading after the jump.

Archtober Building of the Day #20B> Donald Judd Home and Studio

Architecture, East, Interiors, Preservation
Tuesday, October 21, 2014
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(Joshua White / Judd Foundation Archives)

Archtober Building of the Day #20
Donald Judd Home and Studio
101 Spring Street
Architecture Research Office; Walter B. Melvin Architects

The Soho of the 1970s has come and gone, grungy artists’ studios replaced by glitzy storefronts and luxury condos. However, two decades after artist Donald Judd passed away in 1994, his presence still permeates 101 Spring Street. It’s in the nooks he carved out for his children and his books, his kitchenware and furniture, and, most of all, his art.

Continue reading after the jump.

Archtober Building of the Day #20A> The Metropolitan Museum of Art David H. Koch Plaza

Other
Tuesday, October 21, 2014
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(Eve Dilworth Rosen)

(Eve Dilworth Rosen)

Archtober Building of the Day #20
The Metropolitan Museum of Art David H. Koch Plaza
1000 5th Avenue
OLIN

Do you know the difference between hedging your trees and pollarding them? Thanks to the enlightenment provided by our tour guides from OLIN’s design team, Partner Dennis McGlade and Associate Scott Dismukes, those who attended yesterday’s Archtober tour do now. The London Plane trees in the bosques adjacent to the ground level entrances at the Metropolitan Museum of Art will be pollarded—trimmed each winter to the same height.  The Little Leaf Lindens, which form the two flanking rows of sidewalk trees will pruned annually to form aerial hedges, thus distinguishing them from the fluffy naturals of Central Park.

Continue reading after the jump.

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