Gaetano Pesce walks the line between art and architecture with new exhibit in Soho

Architecture, Art
Thursday, March 26, 2015
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pesce

(Allouche Gallery)

 

Gaetano Pesce is a designer who works between art and architecture and wants his designs to attack or argue against the results of standardized commercial design. He uses poetry, sometimes humor, color, and texture (in foam, resin, and urethane ) to create whimsical chairs, couches, and domestic art for gallery spaces.

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This roadway in New York City’s Washington Heights is being replaced by a pedestrian plaza with playfully meandering paving

(Courtesy New York City DDC and DOT)

(Courtesy New York City DDC and DOT)

New York City recently broke ground on a 14,000-square-foot public plaza in Washington Heights with a very wavy paving design. The Plaza de Las Americas  is intended to reference town squares found in the Caribbean, Central and South America. It was designed for the city by the RBA Group, a landscape architecture and engineering consulting firm.

Continue reading after the jump.

AN’s own Susan Kramer appears in New York Times video on Union Square

East, Media
Monday, March 23, 2015
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Union Square in New York City. (Wikimedia Commons)

Union Square in New York City. (Wikimedia Commons)

In the latest installment of its by “Block by Block” video series, the New York Times explored Manhattan’s thriving Union Square neighborhood. The video kicks off with AN‘s very own Susan Kramer, who is a long time resident of the area.

Watch the video after the jump.

On View> New York’s landmarked interiors get their own show at the New York School of Interior Design

(Larry Lederman)

(Larry Lederman)

Rescued, Restored, Reimagined: New York’s Landmark Interiors
New York School of Interior Design Gallery
161 East 69th Street, New York City
Through April 24

There are 117 landmarked public interior spaces in New York City. That seems like a fair number until you realize that the city is home to more than 1,300 building exteriors that have been granted landmark status. Rescued, Restored, Reimagined, an exhibition currently on show at the New York School of Interior Design Gallery (NYSID), seeks to strike a balance by making the argument that historic interiors are just as important as the edifices that enclose them.

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Review> Richard Estes’s photorealistic paintings of New York on view at the Museum of Arts and Design

Architecture, Art, East, Newsletter, On View, Review
Wednesday, March 18, 2015
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Richard Estes, The Plaza's Plaza from a city bus, 1991.

Richard Estes, The Plaza’s Plaza from a city bus, 1991.

Richard Estes: Painting New York City
Museum of Arts & Design
New York
Through September 20, 2015

The first exhibition of art at this institution originally and primarily devoted to craft consists of photorealist paintings spanning 50 years by one of the most accomplished masters of the style. And in the dispassionate way typical of this artist and the genre, they show some subtle changes that have taken place in the cityscape.

Continue reading after the jump.

It will cost $11 billion to fix the Port Authority Bus Terminal, so says the Port Authority

Development, East, Transportation
Wednesday, March 18, 2015
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Port Authority Bus Terminal. (Flickr /  Eric Allix Rogers)

Port Authority Bus Terminal. (Flickr /
Eric Allix Rogers)

The Port Authority of New York & New Jersey claimed it will cost $11 billion to overhaul its supremely hated bus terminal in Manhattan. Yes, everyone agrees the place is pretty much a dump, but $11 billion? That sure seems steep.

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Eavesdrop> Ferry Fiasco: Ice shuts down ferry service on New York City’s East River

A ferry struggles with ice on the East River. (Several seconds / Flickr)

A ferry struggles with ice on the East River. (Several seconds / Flickr)

 

As AN reported, it will be quite difficult for New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio to pull off his plan to launch a five-borough ferry system. There are, of course, the obvious issues surrounding subsidies, ridership, operators, and dock placement that could all cause major headaches down the road. While the mayor starts charting his path through these details, another potential problem came to the fore: winter weather.

Continue reading after the jump.

After a year-long search, the Met chooses David Chipperfield to design the museum’s new wing

The Met. (Flickr / Andrew Mace)

The Met. (Flickr / Andrew Mace)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art has announced that David Chipperfield has been selected to “develop a new design for the Southwest Wing for modern and contemporary art, and potentially for adjacent galleries for the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas, as well as additional operational spaces.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Comment> The Met Plaza redesign undermines the institution’s civic grandeur

The old Met plaza. (Courtesy Paul Gunther)

The old Met plaza. (Courtesy Paul Gunther)

In February of the year 2012, when the Metropolitan Museum of Art first announced the redesign of the City-owned Fifth Avenue-fronted plaza along its grand McKim, Mead & White Beaux-Arts facade, there was little opposition from preservationists. A $65 million underwriting pledge from museum trustee, David H. Koch, catalyzed the selected competitive plan from Philadelphia-based OLIN. It proceeded through the approval process with relative dispatch.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Artist invites viewers to walk through steel at the New Museum’s 2015 Triennial

Art, East, On View
Monday, March 9, 2015
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(Courtesy of Kriska Decor)

(Courtesy of Kriska Decor)

Streaming from the ceiling like colored rain, Daniel Steegmann Mangrané’s steel curtain installation is far less delicate than it appears. Up close, the completely see-through curtain of steel mesh looks like raindrops stitched together, whose straight-down free-fall is punctuated by geometric and and insect-like laser cutouts framed in powder-coated steel.

Continue reading after the jump.

Sandhogs continue to make progress on New York City’s enormous $11 billion East Side train tunnel

(MTA Capital Construction / Rehema Trimiew)

(MTA Capital Construction / Rehema Trimiew)

New York City’s MTA has posted another collection of East Side Access construction photos to remind New Yorkers that its majorly delayed and hugely over budget project is still actually chugging along. When East Side Access is ultimately completed, at the cost of nearly $11 billion, it will connect Long Island Rail Road trains to Grand Central making life easier for about 80,000 commuters. But that’s a long ways off—last we heard, the project will not be completed until 2023.

Check out construction progress after the jump.

Eavesdrop> Breakfast in Peril: This enormous mirror comes crashing down on the Soho brunch set

East, Eavesdroplet, Interiors
Thursday, March 5, 2015
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The collapsed mirror at Balthazar restaurant. (@lizeswein / Twitter)

The collapsed mirror at Balthazar restaurant. (@lizeswein / Twitter)

 

One doesn’t expect to be in danger when noshing on a croissant and sipping some coffee at a swanky Soho Brasserie—maybe a spilt Bloody Mary at worst. But, one morning in February, at Keith McNally’s Balthazar, the preeminent power breakfast spot in Soho, customers got quite the fright when an enormous mirror, mounted to a wall, came crashing down on them.

Continue reading after the jump.

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