Hot Tub Design Machine: New York’s Van Alen Institute launches its annual auction of out-of-the-box architectural experiences

Architecture, East
Monday, May 11, 2015
.
Bid on an architecture roundtable at Charles Renfro's Fire Island's hot tub. (Courtesy Van Alen Institute)

Bid on an architecture roundtable at Charles Renfro’s Fire Island’s hot tub. (Courtesy Van Alen Institute)

If you have ever longed to explore nature with your favorite architect or discuss the built environment in your bikini, now you’ll have the chance. Well, for a few bucks, but in the good name of architecture. The Van Alen Institute has launched its online auction of Art + Design Experiences to coincide with its Spring Party, going down this Wednesday in Lower Manhattan.

Continue reading after the jump.

Santiago Calatrava’s World Trade Center Transportation Hub begins to open up to the public

The PATH train's Platform B will open to the public at Santiago Calatrava's World Trade Center Transportation Hub. (Courtesy Port Authority)

The PATH train’s Platform B will open to the public at Santiago Calatrava’s World Trade Center Transportation Hub. (Courtesy Port Authority)

After all these years (read: delays), the public will finally be able to check out the grand oculus in Santiago Calatrava‘s $3.9 billion World Trade Center Transportation Hub—starting next month.

Continue reading after the jump.

Thanks to Rupert Murdoch, Norman Foster’s 2 World Trade Center might actually happen

(Courtesy Foster + Partners)

(Courtesy Foster + Partners)

Richard Rogers‘ long-stalled 3 World Trade Center finally climbing again, it’s concrete core rising steadily above its nearly-complete podium. Now, it’s Norman Foster’s turn to bring the last of the World Trade towers to life, and it might happen this time with the help of a media giant.

Continue reading after the jump.

Video> Watch Bjarke Ingels’ Manhattan “Dry Line” form before your eyes

The berm. (Courtesy BIG)

The berm. (Courtesy BIG)

The Bjarke Ingels Group’s plan to wrap Lower Manhattan in a landscape berm to keep floodwaters at bay was definitely one of the most architecturally interesting proposals to come from Rebuild By Design, the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s competition to boost resiliency in a post-Sandy world. Last June, the plan—known as “The BIG U” or “The Dry Line”—also became the competitions’s biggest winner.

Watch the video after the jump.

Calatrava on the state of NYC architecture & his own controversial World Trade projects

The World Trade Center site. (Courtesy Port Authority)

The World Trade Center site. (Courtesy Port Authority)

The Real Deal recently scored an interview with Santiago Calatrava, the so-called “symphonist of steel” behind the upcoming (and wildly over budget) World Trade Center Transit Hub, and the nearby Saint Nicholas Church. In the interview, Calatrava explained how New York City’s building code impacted the two projects’ designs, offers his thoughts on the World Trade Center master plan, and comments on the construction quality of the Transit Hub. Overall, the controversial architect lavishes praise on just about everyone—from Daniel Libeskind to Larry Silverstein to the Port Authority.

Plan for a parametric townhouse of undulating brick “flames” is rekindled in Tribeca

Model of 187 Franklin. (Courtesy SYSTEMarchitects)

Model of 187 Franklin. (Courtesy SYSTEMarchitects)

Getting the blessing of the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission can be a tricky thing. Typically, your best bet is to go contextual: stick with historic materials and keep the modern ornamentation to a minimum. That is clearly not the approach that SYSTEMarchitects‘ Jeremy Edmiston took for a parametrically designed Tribeca townhouse in search of facelift.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Were the World Trade Center Transit Hub’s lateral struts part of the original Calatrava design?

Santiago Calatrava's World Trade Center Transit Hub. (William Menking / AN)

Santiago Calatrava’s World Trade Center Transit Hub. (William Menking / AN)

 

The World Trade Center Transportation Hub—or as its designer Santiago Calatrava likes to think of it, the “bird in flight”—is just blocks from AN‘s office, so we get to walk by and watch it try to take off regularly. But in the weeks before the holidays, odd “struts” started to be welded between the structure’s giant fins or blades.

Read More

Eavesdrop> One Rat Center

East, Eavesdroplet, Skyscrapers
Tuesday, December 23, 2014
.
one-rat-center

(Michael Tapp / Flickr; Montage by AN)

 

Speaking of One World Trade, Condé Nast’s highly publicized move-in did not go entirely as planned. According to Gawker, Vogue, which is occupying floors 25 and 26, had to delay the relocation of its editorial department due to an infestation of rats. The rodent problem was evidently so dire that the fashion magazine’s editor-in-chief, a one Anna Wintour, went so far as to issue an order to her staff that they must ensure her office is a rat-free zone before she sets foot inside.

Read More

Eavesdrop> Not My Spire: Sculptor wants no connection to World Trade topper

(Anthony Quintano / Flickr)

(Anthony Quintano / Flickr)

Sculptor Kenneth Snelson is tired of having his name all over the derided spire atop One World Trade Center. It has been widely reported that Snelson consulted with Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) on the 441-foot-tall spire that brings the tower to its highly symbolic height of 1,776 feet. But he said he was only peripherally involved in the early stages of the design and is not all that connected to what now towers above Lower Manhattan. Snelson said everyone involved in the design of the spire had the best intentions, but as for its final iteration, he’s no fan. “I don’t know why somebody doesn’t decide, ‘well, we should remove the spire,’” he said.

With SHoP’s skyscraper in the balance, Howard Hughes stacks a Seaport hearing

SHoP's Seaport-adjacent tower. (Courtesy SHoP)

SHoP’s proposed Seaport-adjacent tower. (Courtesy SHoP)

Last night, at 6:00p.m. sharp, Community Board 1’s Landmarks Committee kicked off a public hearing on the Howard Hughes Corporation’s controversial plans to remake New York City’s South Street Seaport. The event was held at St. Paul’s Chapel in Lower Manhattan and it was standing room only before anybody got up to the mic. By five after, people waiting on the chapel steps were being turned away.

Continue reading after the jump.

This beautiful photo of Lower Manhattan won SOM’s World Trade Center photo contest

Architecture, Awards, East, Skyscrapers
Thursday, December 11, 2014
.
(Gerry Padden / Courtesy SOM)

(Gerry Padden / Courtesy SOM)

While the critics sure don’t like it, many other casual observers are big fans of Lower Manhattan‘s World Trade Center. This morning, SOM announced the winner its #WelcomeOneWTC photography contest it held to mark the grand opening of New York City’s latest controversy-laden skyscraper.

Read More

Here’s how Santiago Calatrava’s New York City transit hub got its enormous $4 billion price tag

Architecture, Development, East
Wednesday, December 3, 2014
.
Final rafter being installed on the Hub's Oculus. (Courtesy Port Authority)

Final rafter being installed on the Hub’s Oculus. (Courtesy Port Authority)

With the final rafter installed on Santiago Calatrava’s World Trade Center Transit Hub the New York Times has done a deep-dive on how, exactly, the long-delayed structure ended up costing close to $4 billion. While the hub ultimately looks more like a stegosaurus than a dove taking flight, as Calatrava originally envisioned, it is undeniably a head-turning piece of dramatic architecture. But one that will be forever grounded by the reality of its staggering price tag.

Read More

Page 1 of 3123

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2015 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License