Finally, Los Angeles moving ahead with rail connection to LAX

Staff rendering of proposed 96th street station (METRO)

Staff rendering of proposed 96th street station (METRO)

At long last, it appears Los Angeles is getting its train to the airport. Last week, the board of LA County’s transit agency, METRO, agreed to proceed with a $200-million light-rail station, part of the new Crenshaw Line, connecting to a proposed people mover that will usher passengers to their terminals. The new station would be located about a mile and a half east of LAX’s central terminal area, and about a half mile north of the Crenshaw Line’s Aviation/ Century Stop,  at 96th Street and Aviation Boulevard.

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Proponents Lose Battle to Build Park Across Los Angeles River

The old Figueroa-Riverside bridge will be demolished as a new vehicular bridge is built upstream. (waltarrrrr / Flickr)

The old Figueroa-Riverside bridge will be demolished as a new vehicular bridge is built upstream. (waltarrrrr / Flickr)

A proposal to turn the old Riverside-Figueroa Bridge into a High Line–style park appears to be dead after a Los Angeles County Superior Court judge declined to issue a temporary restraining order to demolition crews. Introduced by RAC Design Build and EnrichLA last fall, the Figueroa Landbridge would have preserved part of the 1939 bridge for use by pedestrians and cyclists while the replacement span for vehicular traffic was built upstream. Read More

Meet MUPPette, Gensler’s marriage of 3D printing and unmanned drones

Architecture, Technology, West
Thursday, June 26, 2014
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Two of the most talked about new technologies in our world today—3D printing and unmanned drones—are beginning to merge. A good example: Mobile 3D Printing, a research project in Gensler’s Los Angeles office attempting to create an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) fully capable of digital fabrication—freeing the technology from the constraints of boxes, robotic arms, and X-Y-Z axes.

Continue reading after the jump.

Open Streets Events Rolling Out Across the Country This Summer

Summer Streets 2011 (New York City Department of Transportation/Flickr)

Summer Streets 2011 (New York City Department of Transportation/Flickr)

The Open Streets movement is a wildly popular tool in the Tactical Urbanist‘s arsenal. The concept is simple: shut down city streets to automobile traffic for a day so pedestrians and cyclists can fully utilize our most plentiful public spaces. Cities from New York to Los Angeles now celebrate their open spaces with programs that are about to kick off for the summer season. Here’s a roundup of some of the top programs around the country.

View upcoming open streets events after the jump.

On View> Los Angeles Design Festival through June 29

West
Wednesday, June 18, 2014
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Love design? Love Los Angeles? Then put on your walking/biking/gallery-prowling shoes and get ready for the 2014 Los Angeles Design Festival. The festival, which opened last Friday, is a two-week tribute to the best of LA architecture and design. Its program is packed with tours, mixers, exhibitions, and other special events. Read More

Constructivist Playground by Warren Techentin Architecture

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Warren Techentin Architecture's La Cage Aux Folles is on display at Materials & Applications in Los Angeles through August. (Nick Cope)

Warren Techentin Architecture’s La Cage Aux Folles is on display at Materials & Applications in Los Angeles through August. (Nick Cope)

An interactive installation reconsiders the definitions of enclosure and openness.

Warren Techentin Architecture’s digitally-designed La Cage Aux Folles, on display at Materials & Applications in Los Angeles through August, was inspired by a decidedly analog precedent: the yurt. “Yurts are circular,” explained Techentin, who studied the building type as part of his thesis work at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design. “That began the idea of using small-diameter rods and taking software and configuring sweeps with some special scripts that we found online.” But while the yurt’s primary function is shelter, Techentin’s open-air installation, built of 6,409 linear feet of steel pipe, is a literal and intellectual playground, its form an investigation of the dualities of inside and out, enclosure and openness. Read More

Eavesdrop> Gehry Gossip and Koshalek Clatter: Is a Frank Gehry Museum in the works?

Richard Koshalek. (Courtesy Southern California Public Radio)

Richard Koshalek. (Courtesy Southern California Public Radio)

We’ve known for some time now that ex MOCA director Richard Koshalek has returned to Los Angeles from D.C., where he recently stepped down as director of the Hirshhorn Museum. Now we know one of his exploits: We hear that he is consulting Frank Gehry on the organization of his vast archives. Maybe this means there will someday be a Gehry museum? Certainly the architect is not getting any younger, so we may hear more soon.

Broad Collection Sues Seele over Problematic Los Angeles Museum Facade

Mockup of The Broad's GFRC panels (Matt Construction)

Mockup of The Broad’s GFRC panels. (Courtesy Matt Construction)

In a recent interview, Diller Scofidio + Renfro Senior Associate Kevin Rice told AN that the “veil” at Los Angeles’ Broad Museum—a facade made of hundreds of molded Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete (GFRC) panels, had been delayed by over a year. “Some of the things took longer to make than they thought, but there aren’t really problems with it,” Rice said.

But now it looks like the issues with the museum’s facade are more severe than initially thought.

Continue reading after the jump.

Los Angeles Announces Makeover Candidates for Great Streets Program

Improvements are already planned on this stretch of Figueroa Street south of Downtown Los Angeles (above), but a new Great Streets plan brings improvements to additional portions of the street. (Courtesy MyFigueroa)

Improvements are already planned on this stretch of Figueroa Street south of Downtown Los Angeles (above), but a new Great Streets plan brings improvements to additional portions of the street. (Courtesy MyFigueroa)

As the United States’ prototypical car-oriented freeway town, Los Angeles continues to edge its way toward becoming a pedestrian-friendly metropolis. The city’s Great Streets Initiative, a program intended to redesign public space to be more pedestrian- and cyclist-friend, officially moved forward this week as Mayor Eric Garcetti announced the first 15 streets that will be targeted for improvement throughout the city.

Continue reading after the jump.

Zaha Hadid’s Los Angeles Opera Set Completes Mozart Trilogy

Architecture, Art, On View, West
Wednesday, May 28, 2014
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Hadid's set for Cosi fan tutee. (Mathew Imaging)

Hadid’s set for Cosi fan tutee. (Mathew Imaging)

The Los Angeles Philharmonic has a thing for star architects. As part of a trilogy of Mozart operas directed by Gustavo Dudamel (himself a global celebrity), in 2012  Frank Gehry designed the set for Don Giovanni, in 2013 Jean Nouvel designed one for The Marriage of Figaro, and this month Zaha Hadid Architects has designed the backdrop for Così fan tutee, the trilogy’s finale.

Continue reading after the jump.

Another Lautner-Designed Building in Los Angeles Threatened With Demolition

AbilityFirst's Paul Weston Work Center, John Lautner's most recent endangered building (Los Angeles Conservancy)

AbilityFirst’s Paul Weston Work Center, John Lautner’s most recent endangered building. (Los Angeles Conservancy)

According to the Los Angeles Conservancy, yet another John Lautner building is in imminent danger. This time it’s the architect’s Crippled Children’s Society Rehabilitation Center, now known as the AbilityFirst Paul Weston Work Center, in Woodland Hills. Current owner AbilityFirst and Oakmont Senior Living, the potential buyer, submitted for a demolition and new construction permit in February, hoping to build a new Eldercare facility on the site, and the project was presented at a city Zoning Administration public hearing this week.

Continue reading after the jump.

Neil Denari Designing New School In Los Angeles

Architecture, News, West
Thursday, May 22, 2014
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Neil Denari. (Courtesy NMDA)

Neil Denari. (Courtesy NMDA)

Neil Denari‘s firm NMDA was recently awarded the commission for the Wildwood School, a 65,000 square foot building for 500 students on Olympic Boulevard in West Los Angeles. Other firms considered for the commission included Koning Eizenberg and Gensler. Since the selection was based on a team, not a scheme, “We are starting from scratch basically,” Denari said, adding that the “politics, culture, and academic agendas of the school are directly in line with our ideas as architects.” Stay tuned to see how that translates into a design. Meanwhile Denari is waiting for approval on another ground up structure in the area: 9000 Wilshire, a curvaceous, highly three dimensional speculative office building in Beverly Hills.

 

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