Gruen Associates Clad Utility Plant in Flowing Steel

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Gruen Associates wrapped the new LAX Central Utility Plant in a sleek envelope of stainless steel and corrugated aluminum. (Courtesy Gruen Associates)

Gruen Associates wrapped the new LAX Central Utility Plant in a sleek envelope of stainless steel and corrugated aluminum. (Courtesy Gruen Associates)

Curved metal facade embodies spirit of mobility at LAX.

The commission to design a new Central Utility Plant (CUP) for Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) came with a major caveat: the original 1960s-era CUP would remain online throughout construction, providing heating and cooling to adjacent passenger terminals until the new plant was ready to take over. Read More

On View> Kim Stringfellow’s Jackrabbit Homestead at The Autry

(Kim Stringfellow)

(Kim Stringfellow)

Kim Stringfellow’s Jackrabbit Homestead
The Autry in Griffith Park
4700 Western Heritage Way
Los Angeles
Through August 23

The California desert has long been an object of fascination for creatives and explorers fleeing the monotony and sprawl of Los Angeles. Artist Kim Stringfellow follows in that tradition with Jackrabbit Homestead, an exhibition that explores—through photographs and audio interviews—a collection of dilapidated 1950s cabins and the surrounding reclamation of land and structures in this harsh landscape.

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Photographer Wayne Thom captured Late Modernism like no one else, and now his archive is looking for a home

Sears, Roebuck and Company, Pacific Coast Territory Administrative Offices. Alhambra, CA.  A.C. Martin & Associates. design 1969, completion 1971. (Wayne Thom)

Sears, Roebuck and Company, Pacific Coast Territory Administrative Offices. Alhambra, CA. A.C. Martin & Associates. design 1969, completion 1971. (Wayne Thom)

As 1970s and 1980s architecture returns to vogue, a new recognition of those associated with its making and documentation also arises. So it is with Wayne Thom, long the preeminent architectural photographer of the large, Late Modern building by the large firm.

More after the jump.

On View> Sculptor Michael Parker’s disco ball sauna steams up this Pasadena gallery

Art, Newsletter, On View, West
Tuesday, July 7, 2015
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A field trip encounter with Michael Parker’s Steam Egg II (which was not heated during the student’s visit) at the Armory Center for the Arts in Pasadena. (Ruiqi Li)

A field trip encounter with Michael Parker’s Steam Egg II (which was not heated during the student’s visit) at the Armory Center for the Arts in Pasadena. (Ruiqi Li)

On a recent Sunday in Pasadena, a half-dozen visitors strolled barefoot across the finished wooden floors of an art gallery, some wearing swimming trunks, others in bikinis or cut-offs, beach towels draped casually across their shoulders as they viewed the work on display.

The occasion for this unlikely scene was a steam session hosted by sculptor Michael Parker at the Armory Center for the Arts, part of the exhibition After Victor Papanek: The Future Is Not What It Used to Be.

Continue reading after the jump.

Q+A> Italian icon Mario Bellini on passion, the past, and the Kar-a-Sutra

Bellini's Kar-A-Sutra (1972) was exhibited as part of MoMA's Italy: New Domestic Landscapes. (Courtesy Mario Bellini Architects)

Bellini’s Kar-A-Sutra (1972) was exhibited as part of MoMA’s Italy: New Domestic Landscapes. (Courtesy Mario Bellini Architects)

Italian designer Mario Bellini is a master of many mediums: architecture, furniture, photography, and language. He was the editor of Domus in the 1980s and designed buildings all over the world, including the Department of Islamic Art at the Louvre in Paris. At 80, he’s intensely productive as ever. Recently, Humboldt Books published U.S.A. 1972, a book photographs he shot with his Hasselblad in the early seventies.

Bellini’s collaborative relationship with Cassina goes back decades and he’s created some of the furniture company’s most iconic designs. Cassina released several new pieces—a bed, a lounge—in the Cab family, the now-classic line he first began with a chair in 1977. To celebrate, Bellini embarked on a multi-city speaking tour. AN caught up with him at the Cassina showroom in Los Angeles.

Continue reading after the jump.

New Lakers headquarters by Rossetti and Perkins+Will gives team home court advantage

A state of the art facility caters to Lakers players and fans. (Courtesy Rosetti)

A state of the art facility caters to Lakers players and fans. (Courtesy Rossetti)

As Los Angeles braces for the likelihood of one or more new football stadium projects, the National Basketball Association’s Los Angeles Lakers have unveiled plans for a sports facility of its own. Rossetti, a design firm specializing in the sports and entertainment industries, teamed up with the L.A. office of Perkins+Will on a 120,000-square-foot training center and administrative headquarters. Read More

Renzo Piano’s globe gets go-ahead from LA City Council

Architecture, West
Friday, June 26, 2015
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Los Angeles City Council Approves Academy Museum of Motion Pictures Project. (Courtesy Renzo Piano Building Workshop/ Studio Pali Fekete architects/A.M.P.A.S.)

Los Angeles City Council Approves Academy Museum of Motion Pictures Project. (Courtesy Renzo Piano Building Workshop/ Studio Pali Fekete architects/A.M.P.A.S.)

And… action. In a unanimous vote the LA City Council approved Renzo Piano’s plans for the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. The design, which includes a renovation of the AC Martin’s May Company Building on Wilshire and Fairfax avenues and the eye-popping addition of a 140-foot-diameter glass and steel globe sited behind the existing 1939 building, comes with at $300 million estimated construction cost and hopes to open in 2017. Read More

Playful op-art beats out fifty shades of gray in competition to design new Los Angeles Convention Center

Architecture, West
Thursday, June 18, 2015
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HMC Architects and Populous.

HMC Architects and Populous.

Call it a win for color. A bright-hued design for the renovation and expansion of the Los Angeles Convention Center by Populous and HMC Architects beat out the gray proposals by the other two finalists—Gensler and Lehrer Architects and AC Martin and LMN Architects—in a city-led competition.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Arik Levy reflects on design with his new exhibit at Los Angeles’ Please Do Not Enter gallery

Art, Design, On View, West
Monday, June 15, 2015
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Installation view of Arik Levy Intimate Formations on view at Please Do Not Enter. (Marcia Prentice)

Installation view of Arik Levy Intimate Formations on view at Please Do Not Enter. (Marcia Prentice)

The announcement for Arik Levy: Intimate Formations, the inaugural exhibition at Please Do Not Enter that just opened in Downtown Los Angeles, reads Levy is an “artist, technician, photographer, designer, video artist.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Munching on air pollutants: Would you eat these meringues made from the smog you breathe every day?

(Courtesy The Center for Genomic Gastronomy)

(Courtesy The Center for Genomic Gastronomy)

How do you coax city slickers to really take notice of air pollution? Start selling meringues, of course. At this year’s Ideas City festival in New York City, the Center for Genomic Gastronomy set up a “Smog Tasting” food cart introducing aeroir (a play on terroir for the atmospheric taste of place) meringues infused with recreated urban smog from four cities.

Continue reading after the jump.

Eavesdrop> Jerde Music: Noted architect gets an exuberant farewell at Los Angeles’ Union Station

Eavesdroplet, Obit, West
Tuesday, June 9, 2015
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(Ali Wade / Flickr)

(Ali Wade / Flickr)

One of Los Angeles‘ most influential architects, Jon Jerde, who recently passed away, was known for the ebullience and animation of his designs. So it was only fitting that his funeral be held at LA’s stunning Union Station, inside the Grand Concourse, accompanied by nothing less than a full Mariachi band. When Eavesdrop finally goes to the Page Six in the sky, this is exactly how we would like to go out.

Here are three bold designs from winning teams that completely reimagine the Los Angeles Convention Center

Architecture, News, West
Friday, May 22, 2015
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HMC Architects and Populous.

HMC Architects and Populous.

The Los Angeles Convention Center is desperately in need of an overhaul. Architect Charles Luckman designed the original boxy structure in 1971 and James Ingo Freed added the glassy Annex in 1997. Today, both buildings lack the square footage and amenities to add up to a competitive venue. Centers in Las Vegas or Chicago eclipse LA’s meager 870,000 square feet by double or triple square footage. Indeed, in the decades since the venue was constructed the whole approach to convention center design has changed.

Continue reading after the jump.

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