Larry Scarpa on Los Angeles and the Building Envelope

Center for Manufacturing Innovation, Metalsa CIDeVeC in Apodaca, Nuevo Leon, designed by Brooks + Scarpa. (Courtesy Brooks + Scarpa)

Center for Manufacturing Innovation, Metalsa CIDeVeC in Apodaca, Nuevo Leon, designed by Brooks + Scarpa. (Courtesy Brooks + Scarpa)

With its combination of warm temperatures, low humidity, bright sun, and vulnerability to earthquakes and fires, Southern California presents a unique set of opportunities and challenges to facade designers and builders. “It’s way more forgiving here than in most places,” said Larry Scarpa, principal at Los Angeles-based Brooks + Scarpa. “I’ve been on design reviews in various parts of the country where you have to do things much differently with the building envelope. In Southern California you have a lot of freedom to explore things that you don’t in other parts of the world.” Scarpa and other AEC industry movers and shakers will gather in early February at Facades+ LA to discuss possibilities and trends in building envelope design, both in Los Angeles and beyond.

Continue reading after the jump.

LACE by Jenny Wu, Prêt-à-3D Print

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Jenny Wu's jewelry line, LACE, includes digitally-designed, 3D printed necklaces, earrings, and rings. (Courtesy LACE)

Jenny Wu’s jewelry line, LACE, includes digitally-designed, 3D printed necklaces, earrings, and rings. (Courtesy LACE)

Oyler Wu Collaborative partner delves into jewelry design.

Oyler Wu Collaborative partner Jenny Wu had long dreamed of designing jewelry—just as soon as she found some spare time. Last fall, she realized that she might wait forever for a break from her busy architecture practice. “At some point I decided, ‘I’ll design some pieces, and the easiest way to make it happen is just to 3D print them,'” said Wu. She fabricated a couple of necklaces, and brought them on her just-for-fun trip to Art Basel Miami Beach 2013. “I wore my pieces around, and I was stunned by the response I was getting,” she recalled. “People kept coming up to me, literally every five seconds. After a while, I thought, ‘Maybe I do have something that’s unique, especially for a design crowd.'”
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On View> HOME is Where the Art Is at the El Segundo Museum of Art

ESMoA's HOME juxtaposes works from different styles, media, and periods in an apartment-like setting. (Courtesy ESMoA)

ESMoA’s HOME juxtaposes works from different styles, media, and periods in an apartment-like setting. (Courtesy ESMoA)

Forget “home is where the heart is.” Home is where the art is—or so argues the latest show from the El Segundo Museum of Art (ESMoA). HOME isn’t your typical art exhibition, just as ESMoA isn’t your typical art museum. (In fact, ESMoA prefers the terms “experience” and “laboratory,” respectively. ) The experience, which runs through February 1, 2015, invites visitors to re-evaluate their personal definitions of art, the home, and—most especially—art in the home.

Continue reading after the jump.

Los Angeles proposes ambitious, and costly, earthquake plan

Northridge Meadows Apartment after the 1994 Northridge earthquake (City of Los Angeles)

Northridge Meadows Apartment after the 1994 Northridge earthquake (City of Los Angeles)

In the wake of damaging reports about Los Angeles’ unpreparedness for the next Big One, Mayor Eric Garcetti yesterday proposed a new earthquake plan that, if passed, would require owners to retrofit thousands of wood frame and concrete buildings.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Public Work, Lines of Desire: Peter Shire at Los Angeles’ A+D Museum

Art, On View, West
Wednesday, November 26, 2014
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(Peter Shire)

(Peter Shire)

Public Work, Lines of Desire: Peter Shire
A+D Architecture and Design Museum
6032 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, California
Through January 31, 2015

The A+D Museum is displaying the public and private architectural commissions of Los Angeles artist Peter Shire in Public Work, Lines of Desire. Shire’s architectural work combines graphic forms and structural geometry with highly saturated colors in a meditation on the collision between popular culture and the visual language of design that explores the line between “fine” and “applied” art.

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Maltzan Bridging Gap at Hammer Museum

Architecture, Technology, West
Monday, November 24, 2014
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Looking up at the John V. Tunney Bridge from Garden Level (MMA)

Looking up at the John V. Tunney Bridge from Garden Level (MMA)

Michael Maltzan is getting into the bridge business. He’s already part of the HNTB-led Sixth Street Bridge team in Los Angeles, he’s finishing up a bridge in Chengdu, China, and parts of his One Santa Fe (which we will profile in a future issue of AN) in the city’s Arts District themselves form a bridge, extending over the ground plane and allowing peeks toward the L.A. River.

Now he’s been tapped by the Hammer Museum to design the John V. Tunney pedestrian bridge, above the institution’s large garden courtyard, finally connecting its 2nd floor western permanent galleries to its eastern ones. Read More

Eavesdrop> Lifting The Veil On So Many Secrets

Eavesdroplet, West
Friday, November 14, 2014
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If Google Doodle's are any clue, Sergi Brin's new house might look something like this. (Courtesy Google)

If Google Doodle’s are any clue, Sergei Brin’s new house might look something like this. (Courtesy Google)

It’s such a shame that we live in areas so full of secrecy. Why won’t Hollywood stars in Los Angeles or tech moguls in San Francisco let architects spread the word about their million dollar houses? Sure we hear dribs and drabs. For instance that Sergei Brin and a major executive at Yahoo! have both commissioned San Francisco architect Olle Lundberg to design their new abodes. But these tidbits are far too infrequent. So we at Eavesdrop are making a plea for you to share gossip on who is designing for the most famous people you can think of. We promise, we won’t divulge our sources. And we won’t partner with Us Weekly. Probably.

More secrets after the jump.

Peter Zumthor’s massive LACMA addition gets initial funding

Architecture, West
Thursday, November 6, 2014
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Model of Zumthor's LACMA addition, which now spans Wilshire Boulevard (LACMA/ Museum Associates)

Model of Zumthor’s LACMA addition, which now spans Wilshire Boulevard (LACMA/ Museum Associates)

The Los Angeles Board of Supervisors yesterday approved the contribution of $125 million in bond funds to LACMA’s $600 million makeover, which, under the guidance of Peter Zumthor, would tear down most of the campus and snake over Wilshire Boulevard. The new 410,000 square foot building would open in 2023, with the remaining funding coming from private donations. According to the LA Times, LACMA director Michael Govan told the Board of Supervisors that the museum’s older buildings “are really ailing. They are not worth saving. The new building will be much more energy efficient and accessible to a broad public.”

Continue reading after the jump.

More Mergers> NAC Architecture and Osborn joining forces

News, Shft+Alt+Del, West
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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Rendering of NAC's new LA offices. (Courtesy NAC)

Rendering of NAC’s new LA offices. (Courtesy NAC)

It’s no AECOM and URS, but NAC Architecture, which has offices in Spokane, WA, Seattle, Denver, and Los Angeles has merged with Southern California firm Osborn, and are moving their LA operations into new offices in the city’s Chinatown neighborhood. NAC’s 13,000 square foot LA office, to be located on the third floor of a historic building at 837 North Spring Street, will consist of 40 people, including all of Osborn and NAC’s current LA staffs.

Read More

Report: McMansion rules in Los Angeles are largely ineffective

Newsletter, West
Monday, October 13, 2014
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Los Angeles McMansion (Trulia)

Los Angeles McMansion (Trulia)

Despite reports of their demise, giant, neighborhood-busting McMansions in Los Angeles appear to be alive and well. Although they were passed six years ago, it looks like Los Angeles’ Mansionization rules, according to the LA Times, “haven’t stopped neighborhoods from being overwhelmed by out-of-scale homes.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Eavesdrop> Jerde Surprise: Christopher Hawthorne smitten with new LA apartment tower

Architecture, Eavesdroplet, West
Friday, October 10, 2014
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The Vermont. (Courtesy Jerde Partnership)

The Vermont. (Courtesy Jerde Partnership)

In one of the more surprising analyses of his tenure as architecture critic for the Los Angeles Times, Christopher Hawthorne recently came out with breathless praise for The Vermont, a green glass residential tower by Jerde Partnership on Wilshire Boulevard and Vermont Avenue. According to Hawthorne, the building’s “sleek steel-and-glass profile is a reminder that new apartment buildings in Los Angeles can be something other than bland, stucco-covered, stick-built neo-dingbats.” Eavesdrop is no architecture critic, but let’s just say we do not totally agree.

Pedal to the metal at Los Angeles’ Union Station

Development, Urbanism, West
Thursday, September 18, 2014
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Proposed new east entrance to Union Station (Grimshaw/Gruen/Metro)

Proposed new east portal to Union Station (Grimshaw/Gruen/Metro)

After refining their master plan over the last several months, Metro, Grimshaw, and Gruen are ready, as Metro Deputy Executive Officer for Countywide Planning Jenna Hornstock put it, to “put the pedal to the metal.” They’re asking the Metro Planning and Programming Committee to approve several recommendations (PDF) to begin the implementation of their Union Station Master Plan, including the development of a Program Environmental Impact Report. Yesterday they presented to the committee, and a vote is expected at the next gathering on October 15.

Continue reading after the jump.

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