SLO Architecture helps preserve New York City’s disappearing graffiti walls

Architecture, Art, East, Preservation
Monday, December 8, 2014
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The new canopy. (Courtesy SLO Architecture)

The new canopy. (Courtesy SLO Architecture)

Demolition of the graffiti mecca known as “5Pointz” in Long Island City, Queens has become a flashpoint in New York City development. The iconic arts institution was literally whitewashed by the developer last spring and has since been turned to rubble to make way for two rental towers. As the controversial project continues in Queens, the destruction of another world-renowned graffiti forum, just a few miles away in the South Bronx, has gone largely unnoticed.

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New York City to remove 96 sites from landmark consideration

The Pepsi-Cola sign in Long Island City would be "de-calendared by the Landmarks Preservation Commission.

This Pepsi-Cola sign in Queens would be “de-calendared” by the Landmarks Preservation Commission. (Flickr / Whiskeygonebad).

In an effort to supposedly streamline New York City’s landmarking process, the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) will drop 96 buildings and sites from consideration for historic preservation. These sites span all five boroughs and include Union Square, Greenwood Cemetery in Brooklyn, and the Pepsi-Cola sign in Long Island City (above).

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Developer of 5Pointz-replacing towers wants to trademark the name “5Pointz”

5Pointz back in 2011. (Flickr / Dan Nguyen)

5Pointz back in 2011. (Flickr / Dan Nguyen)

As we speak, Long Island City’s graffiti mecca, 5Pointz, is being demolished so two beige apartment towers can rise in its place. But lest we forget the history of the iconic institution, Jerry Wolkoff, the owner of 5Pointz, wants to trademark its name so he can spray it on the residential replacement he is developing.

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Architecture 101> Harvard Students Tackle Policy and Design for Post-Sandy Resiliency

JohnsonTramba_TrevorAlison2

A breakdown of Tramba and Johnson’s restructuring of the National Flood Insurance Program using Jersery City as a pilot site. (Courtesy Harvard GSD)

As the Rebuild By Design jury mulls over a winner of its resiliency-based design competition to re-imagine the East Coast in light of Hurricane Sandy, students in Harvard’s Graduate School of Design have been creating their own ways to protect against the Next Big Storm. While their studio, titled “Design and Politics,” was purely academic, it was modeled on the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s official competition. The Dutchman in charge of Rebuild, Henk Ovink, oversaw the interdisciplinary teams of students, and representatives from half of Rebuild’s final ten teams served as jurors at the studio review.

Continue reading after the jump.

Michael Kimmelman Proposes A Queens-Brooklyn Waterfront Streetcar

The proposed streetcar route. (Courtesy New York Times)

The proposed streetcar route. (Courtesy New York Times)

As development along the Brooklyn and Queens’ waterfront has increased dramatically over the years, transportation options—for residents old and new—has not. The number of glass towers, startups, and parks along the East River has only been matched by style pieces on new “it” neighborhoods from Astoria to Red Hook. But, now, the New York Times’ Michael Kimmelman has used his platform to launch a plan to change that equation, and give these neighborhoods the transportation system they deserve.

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“SuralArk” Selected as Best Folly for Summer Installation at Socrates Sculpture Park

(Jason Austin and Aleksandr Mergold / Courtesy Architectural League)

(Jason Austin and Aleksandr Mergold / Courtesy Architectural League)

Socrates Sculpture Park and the Architectural League have selected Jason Austin and Aleksandr Mergold as the winners of their Folly 2014 competition. Commenced in earlier this year and launched in 2012, the contest’s name and theme derive from the 18th and 19th century Romantic practice of architectural follies, or structures with little discernible function that are typically sited within a garden or landscape. Austin and Mergold’s SuralArk was deemed the most deserving contemporary interpretation of the tradition, and will be erected within the park’s Long Island City confines by early May.

More after the jump.

New York City Gearing Up For New Bike Lane on Pulaski Bridge.  Pulaski Bridge (Courtesy of Newyorkshitty) Now that Citi Bikes are taking over the streets of New York City, the NYC Department of Transportation (NYCDOT) is getting ready to pave the way for a new bike pathThe Daily News reported that the NYCDOT plans on creating a new dedicated bike lane on the Pulaski Bridge, the connection between Greenpoint and Long Island City, by 2014. Currently pedestrians and cyclists share a crowded path, but soon a single traffic lane will be turned into a bike path. An engineering study of the bridge will include this addition and be unveiled to the Community Boards in Queens and Brooklyn in the next few months. (Photo: Courtesy Newyorkshitty)

 

Farewell to the Famed Graffiti Haven: 5Pointz Demolition Moves Ahead

East
Wednesday, October 9, 2013
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5Pointz (Courtesy of 5Pointz NYC)

5Pointz (Courtesy of 5Pointz NYC)

It is the end of an era. The New York City Council voted in a favor of a plan to demolish the iconic 5Pointz, the former manufacturing building-turned-graffiti-mecca, in Long Island City, Queens, to make way for a $400 million residential development. The New York Times reported that the Wolkoff family, the owner and developer of the property, will build two residential towers—one of which will climb up to 47 stories—consisting all together of 1,000 units.

Continue reading after the jump.

Graffiti Mecca in Queens to be Replaced by Residential Towers

East
Thursday, August 22, 2013
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5 Pointz (Courtesy of 5 Pointz NYC)

5 Pointz (Courtesy of 5 Pointz NYC)

The former record needle and clothing manufacturing building, 5 Pointz, in Long Island City, Queens, is one of the few remaining refuges for graffiti art in New York City. For the last two decades, aerosol artists have flocked to this 200,000-square-foot warehouse to exhibit their work. But now the graffiti art mecca is one step closer to being demolished and replaced by two 47 and 41 story residential towers. In spite of Queens Community Board 2’s opposition to the plan, the City Planning Commission voted unanimously to approve a special permit that would allow developer G&M Realty to build a larger structure than permitted by the existing zoning. DNAinfo reported that Queens Borough President Helen Marshall also came out in favor of the plan with the stipulation that the development include 75 affordable housing units and studio space for artists.

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Zoning Change will Open Door for Sprawling Residential Development in Queens

City Terrain, East
Thursday, August 22, 2013
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Hallets Point Development (Courtesy of James Corner Field Operations)

Hallets Point Development (Courtesy of James Corner Field Operations)

Astoria may soon rival its neighbor, Long Island City, as the next major residential waterfront community in Queens. In a unanimous vote, the City Planning Commission has given developer Lincoln Equities Group the green light to move forward with a $1 billion residential housing development on Hallets Point peninsula.

DNAinfo reported that the project would include 2,161 market-rate and 483 affordable apartments as well as a public esplanade along the East River, retail, supermarket, and possibly a public school in NYCHA‘s adjacent Astoria Houses campus.

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MoMA PS1 Expanding Thanks to $3 Million in Funding

East
Thursday, July 18, 2013
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MoMA PS1 in 2012. (Elk Studios)

MoMA PS1 in 2012. (Elk Studios)

In an effort to secure financial backing for the city’s cultural institutions, New York City Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer, who is the chair of the city council’s Cultural Affairs and Libraries Committee, has locked in $3 million of city budget funds to expand MoMA PS1. The funds will be used for the museum to specifically acquire the small apartment building at the rear of its current Romanesque Revival school building at 22-25 Jackson Avenue in Long Island City, Queens.

Continue reading after the jump.

Saturday> Flux Factory to Release Kittens Into a Model City to Teach Kids About Urbanism

East
Friday, May 31, 2013
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kitty_city_01

While it certainly won’t be as terrifying as a Godzilla or King Kong tearing through city streets, what you might call Kitty Kong will be pawing through a model of an imagined ideal city at the Flux Factory in Long Island City, Queens, beginning Saturday. Developed by a team of children, artists, and city planners, the Flux Factory’s Kitty City project is an intergenerational experiment in collaborative urbanism, designed to teach kids the way cities get built, encourage democratic decision making, and challenge the opacity of urban planning processes.

Continue reading after the jump.

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