Wine supplier to the British royal family unveils enchanting new cellar by MJP Architects and Short & Associates

(Courtesy Berry Bros. & Rudd)

(Courtesy Berry Bros. & Rudd)

Britain’s oldest wine merchant, Berry Bros. & Rudd, has unveiled its new subterranean Sussex Cellar, an enchanting juxtaposition of classic and modern by Short & Associates and MJP Architects. Wine suppliers to the British royal family since the reign of King George III in the early 19th century, the brand named its new cellar after the duke of Sussex, one of seven royal dukes who were regular customers during that era.

More after the jump.

London skyline as battleground: Designers render 3D-printed chess pieces in the shape of iconic architecture

(Courtesy Skyline Chess)

(Courtesy Skyline Chess)

City skylines can seem at times like battlegrounds, with architects vying for superlatives of tallest, grandest, and bizarrest. Skyline Chess, founded by London-based designers Chris Prosser and Ian Flood, reimagines chess pieces as miniature models of the city’s landmark buildings.

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Richard Rogers to lead parliamentary inquiry into how design of the built environment affects behavior

(Courtesy Rogers Stirk Harbor + Partners)

(Courtesy Rogers Stirk Harbor + Partners)

Riding on a wave of psychographic research indicating positive correlations between productivity and the work environment, architect Richard Rogers has launched an ambitious parliamentary inquiry into how design overall affects behavior.

The founder of Rogers Stirk Harbor + Partners kicked off the eight-month Design Commission inquiry this June before the Houses of Parliament in London. The cross-party investigation led by Rogers will explore how design in planning of the built environment creates a tendency towards positive behaviors within local communities. The inquiry was lodged the same week as newly-released research which supports the long-held view that cities which promote physical activity benefit from economic productivity gains.

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Pictorial> Step inside Selgascano’s psychedelic Serpentine Pavilion

(Iwan Baan)

(Iwan Baan)

The 2015 Serpentine Pavilion has opened to the public in London‘s Kensington Gardens. The psychedelic, worm-like structure was designed by SelgasCano, a husband-and-wife team based in Madrid, and features translucent ETFE panels that are wrapped and woven like webbing. The architects said the pavilion’s design is partially inspired by the chaos of passing through the London Underground.

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Richard Rogers Calls on the Architecture Community to Save the Robin Hood Gardens

International, Other
Friday, June 19, 2015
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Courtesy Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

Courtesy Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

The clock is ticking yet again for East London’s Robin Hood Gardens, the 1972 Brutalist public housing complex designed by Alison and Peter Smithson. In a call to arms, Lord Richard Rogers and Simon Smithson, the son of the architects, have written a letter to over 300 members of the architecture and construction industries in support of the 20th Century Society’s campaign to protect the iconic “streets in the sky” buildings from being demolished.

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Munching on air pollutants: Would you eat these meringues made from the smog you breathe every day?

(Courtesy The Center for Genomic Gastronomy)

(Courtesy The Center for Genomic Gastronomy)

How do you coax city slickers to really take notice of air pollution? Start selling meringues, of course. At this year’s Ideas City festival in New York City, the Center for Genomic Gastronomy set up a “Smog Tasting” food cart introducing aeroir (a play on terroir for the atmospheric taste of place) meringues infused with recreated urban smog from four cities.

Continue reading after the jump.

Here’s the final stage design of Thomas Heatherwick’s controversial London Garden Bridge

london-garden-bridge-final-designs-6

Dan Pearson’s landscapes are the last part of the design for London’s controversial Garden Bridge to be unveiled. Courtesy Arup.

The final touches have been put on London’s now-infamous Garden Bridge, designed by Heatherwick Studio with Arup and landscape designer Dan Pearson. The most recent renderings, released early this week, show exactly what the spaces on the bridge will look like by offering an up-close look at the garden-like landscaping. The Garden Bridge Trust (GBT) describes it as an “oasis of escapism.”

Continue reading after the jump.

East London ad agency expands its office space with chic plywood interiors by Design Haus Liberty

(Courtesy Design Haus Liberty)

(Courtesy Design Haus Liberty)

East London–based ad agency AnalogFolk recently tacked some extra real estate onto its main headquarters in the British capital, a high-ceilinged loft turned industrial workspace where reclaimed artifacts are repurposed using modern technology.

Continue reading after the jump.

Harvard GSD announces finalists for the 2015 Wheelwright Prize

Left to right:  Work by Quyn Vantu, Malkit Shoshan and Eric L'Heureux. (Courtesy Ben Premeaux, Johannes Schwarz, Kenneth Choo)

Left to right:  Work by Quyn Vantu, Malkit Shoshan and Eric L’Heureux. (Courtesy Ben Premeaux, Johannes Schwarz, Kenneth Choo)

The Harvard Graduate School of Design has announced the three potential awardees of the 2015 Wheelwright Prize, a travel-based architectural research grant valued at $100,000. Each year, one architect from approximately 200 applicants bags the prize.

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Spanish architects unveil a colorful, tangled web for the 15th Serpentine Pavilion in London

Architecture, Art, Design, International
Wednesday, March 25, 2015
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© Steven Kevin Howson / SelgasCano

(Steven Kevin Howson / SelgasCano)

The Serpentine Galleries has unveiled renderings for its 15th summer pavilion which it described as an “amorphous, double-skinned, polygonal structure.” The interactive and certainly bright installation is designed by the Madrid-based SelgasCano and comprises translucent, rainbow-colored panels woven into a webbing system. Visitors are encouraged to enter the pavilion and explore its “secret corridor” and “stained glass-effect interior.”

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English group spearheads effort to save the early Brutalist Robin Hood Gardens

robin-hood-england

Robin Hood Gardens. (Luke Hayes)

What do the English have against works produced by members of the Independent Group? The loose post–World War II group of artists, architects, writers, and critics produced public art, gallery installations, and even architecture. On this side of the Atlantic we always think the Brits save their landmarks—unlike the American tendency to tear them down before they can be landmarked.

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South London’s shipping container coworking venue champions low-cost Live-Work-Play spaces

(Courtesy Carl Turner Architects)

(Courtesy Carl Turner Architects)

Conceptualized as a “cross-functional village” built entirely from shipping containers, the POP Brixton project by Carl Turner Architects offers fertile ground for entrepreneurial endeavors.

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