This pavilion at London’s V&A Museum will be built by robots to resemble construction patterns of beetles

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Elytra Filament Pavilion, render, V&A John Madejski Garden 2016 (Courtesy ICD/ITKE University of Stuttgart, V&A Museum)

Elytra Filament Pavilion, render, V&A John Madejski Garden 2016 (Courtesy ICD/ITKE University of Stuttgart, V&A Museum)

As part of the Victoria & Albert Museum’s Engineering Season in London, a pavilion designed by German foursome Achim Menges, Thomas Auer, Moritz Dörstelmann, and Jan Knippers and constructed by robots is set to steal the show.

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The 16th Serpentine Pavilion will be designed by Bjarke Ingels, with four accompanying Summer Houses

The Denmark Pavilion at the Shanghai Expo 2010. (Iwan Baan / Courtesy Serpentine Galleries)

The Denmark Pavilion at the Shanghai Expo 2010. (Iwan Baan / Courtesy Serpentine Galleries)

Bjarke Ingels has come a long way since he designed the Denmark Pavilion, pictured above, for the Shanghai Expo 2010. His eponymous Copenhagen- and New York–based firm BIG, the Bjarke Ingels Group, today deals with skyscrapers and other large-scale projects in major cities around the world. But this summer, the firm will take a step back to design the 16th Serpentine Pavilion in Kensington Gardens, London.

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Pedal Power: London could soon have more cyclists than motorists on its streets

(Tejvan Pettinger / Flickr)

(Tejvan Pettinger / Flickr)

Since the turn of the century, the number of motorists in London more than halved from 137,000 to 64,000. In the same period, cyclist numbers trebled from 12,000 to 36,000, showing that more commuters are increasingly choosing two wheels over four to get to work.

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Renzo Piano’s embattled “Paddington Pole” tower heads back to the drawing board

Exterior Render. (Courtesy Renzo Piano)

Exterior Render. (Courtesy Renzo Piano)

Those who campaigned against Renzo Piano‘s cylindrical skyscraper in Paddington, London,  are celebrating a victory now that plans for the tower have been withdrawn from planning. The tower, dubbed the “Paddington Pole,” was set to top out 834 feet (72 floors) and rub shoulders with the Cheesegrater (The Leadenhall Building by Richard Rogers).

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Dormant for 70 years, South London’s war-time tunnels now open to the public for the first time

International, Transportation
Thursday, January 7, 2016
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Beds on display (Diamond Geezer / Flickr)

Beds on display (Diamond Geezer / Flickr)

On the surface, Clapham South is your standard Northern Line tube station, complete with art deco decorum to boot. Situated in South London in what was once a gritty part of the capital, but now a typically gentrified area, there are more than just tube tunnels that run below the ground.  Read More

Foster & Partners, HOK among nine shortlisted for UK Houses of Parliament upgrades

Houses of Parliament from across the Thames ( / Flickr )

Houses of Parliament from across the Thames (Berit Watkin / Flickr)

Allies and Morrison, BDP, HOK and Foster+Partners have been shortlisted among a group of nine firms for the refurbishment project at the Houses of Parliament in Westminster, London. The commission is touted to be worth up to $31.5 million.

Continue reading after the jump.

Definitely not a library: Herzog & De Meuron unveils new stadium for Chelsea soccer club in London

Architecture, Design, Development, Urbanism
Thursday, December 3, 2015
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(Courtesy Herzog de Meuron)

(Courtesy Herzog de Meuron)

British soccer team Chelsea FC has submitted plans to the local authorities to construct a new 60,000-seat stadium at Stamford Bridge, their current home ground. The proposal, designed by Herzog & de Meuron, brings with it a price tag of $750 million. The Swiss duo are known for their stadia designs, notably with the Bird’s Nest Stadium in Beijing, the Allianz Arena in Munich, and a wispy venue in Bordeaux. Read More

Cone PWN: Video captures Brits dressed as traffic cones blocking streets in southwest London

(Courtesy Chris Anson via the Evening Standard)

Cause of commotion. (Courtesy Chris Anson via the Evening Standard)

In the southwest London borough of Kingston upon Thames, police officers were left giggling at the sight of walking traffic cones early last Sunday morning. The police file even read: “Males dressed as traffic cones, blocking the street like traffic cones.” However, the Evening Standard has revealed that the act isn’t just a drunken parade, rather a protest against Über car service.

Continue after the jump.

Renzo Piano designs a tree-topped, cylindrical skyscraper for Paddington in London’s West End

Exterior Render. (Courtesy Renzo Piano)

Exterior Render. (Courtesy Renzo Piano)

Renzo Piano aims to punctuate London‘s skyline once again. The architect behind the Shard has now designed a cylinder of glass adjacent to Paddington Station. Contrasting his Southwark skyscraper, Piano has proposed a seemingly crystalline, uneven facade wrapping the cylinder that looks to reflect its surroundings with ripple-like qualities.
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London’s Frieze Art Fair opens a second pavilion by Universal Design Studio after successful 2014 show

Architecture, Art, International
Wednesday, October 21, 2015
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The Frieze Art Fair looks to capitalize on the 55,000 people who thronged a pavilion by Universal Design Studio (UDS) last year by commissioning another. The five-day festival is held in Regent’s Park, London every October.
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Burntwood School by AHMM wins 2015 RIBA Stirling Prize

(Courtesy RIBA)

(Courtesy RIBA)

Burntwood School, a girls high school in Wandsworth, south London, has won the UK’s most coveted architecture award—RIBA‘s Stirling Prize—with judges describing it as the “clear winner.” The project by Allford Hall Monaghan Morris (AHMM) also collected the RIBA London 2015 award in the process.

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Neil Tomlinson Architects is creating a new Covent Garden Market in the heart of London

Architecture, Design, Development
Tuesday, October 13, 2015
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(Courtesy Brand New Covent Garden Market)

(Courtesy Brand New Covent Garden Market)

The now “Brand New” Covent Garden Market (once renamed as “New Covent Garden Market” in 1974) is now wrapping up its redesign. Starting in 1835, the market was the cultural heart of London up until the mid-20th century and has been a lively center of trade throughout its whole life. Now the market specializes in the trade of flowers and food, notably fruit and vegetables.

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