ODA’s jewel-like facade in DUMBO clears Landmarks hurdle on second try

10 Jay round one

The original design. (Courtesy ODA)

 

The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission has given its blessing to ODA‘s jewel-like faceted facade for a factory-to-condo conversion on the Dumbo waterfront. The firm first presented its plans for 10 Jay Street last month, and while it was well received, commissioners didn’t think the dramatic, glassy design was a perfect fit for the historic neighborhood.

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Plan for a parametric townhouse of undulating brick “flames” is rekindled in Tribeca

Model of 187 Franklin. (Courtesy SYSTEMarchitects)

Model of 187 Franklin. (Courtesy SYSTEMarchitects)

Getting the blessing of the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission can be a tricky thing. Typically, your best bet is to go contextual: stick with historic materials and keep the modern ornamentation to a minimum. That is clearly not the approach that SYSTEMarchitects‘ Jeremy Edmiston took for a parametrically designed Tribeca townhouse in search of facelift.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Letter to the Editor> Frick Director Responds to Expansion Critics

THE FRICK'S EXPANSION WOULD EXTEND THE SIX-STORY LIBRARY BUILDING THROUGH TO 70TH STREET AND FILL IN AN EXISTING GARDEN. (COURTESY DAVIS BRODY BOND)

THE FRICK’S EXPANSION WOULD EXTEND THE SIX-STORY LIBRARY BUILDING THROUGH TO 70TH STREET AND FILL IN AN EXISTING GARDEN. (COURTESY DAVIS BRODY BOND)

[Editor’s Note: Opinions expressed in letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions or sentiments of the newspaper. AN welcomes reader letters, which could appear in our regional print editions. To share your opinion, please email editor@archpaper.com]

Regarding the article “Frick Fracas,” (AN_14_12.4.2014), while there has been much debate about the Frick’s proposed addition to address its longstanding space needs, much of it rests on mischaracterizations about the history and original purpose of the site where it will be located.

Continue reading after the jump.

Residential Buildings to Move into Two of Brooklyn’s Landmarked Theaters

Architecture, Development, East, News
Friday, December 12, 2014
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Rendering of new residential complex and Pavilion Theater (Courtesy Architecture Outfit)

Rendering of new residential complex and Pavilion Theater (Courtesy Architecture Outfit)

With the great big residential boom in Brooklyn, the typical housing stock (brownstones, apartment complexes, and the like) has grown scarce steering developers to set their sights on the properties most readily available and ripe for conversion: churches, schools, banks, hospitals, libraries, and even municipal buildings (who needs amenities or services, anyway?!).

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NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission changes course, won’t remove sites from historic consideration

Union Square in New York City which would would have been part of the "de- calendaring." (Flickr /  massmatt)

Union Square in New York City which would would have been part of the “de- calendaring.” (Flickr /
massmatt)

As AN wrote earlier this week, the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) was prepared to “de-calendar” about 100 historic buildings and sites at a meeting next Tuesday. The Commission’s planned action expectedly drew a loud and spirited backlash from preservation groups. Now, just a few days before the action was scheduled, it appears the response has had the desired effect. The New York Times is reporting that the Commission has withdrawn its proposal. “In withdrawing the proposal, [LPC Chair Meenakshi Srinivasan] said she wanted to provide more time for people to speak up for certain properties while making clear all would be dealt with sooner rather than later,” explained the Times.

New York City to remove 96 sites from landmark consideration

The Pepsi-Cola sign in Long Island City would be "de-calendared by the Landmarks Preservation Commission.

This Pepsi-Cola sign in Queens would be “de-calendared” by the Landmarks Preservation Commission. (Flickr / Whiskeygonebad).

In an effort to supposedly streamline New York City’s landmarking process, the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) will drop 96 buildings and sites from consideration for historic preservation. These sites span all five boroughs and include Union Square, Greenwood Cemetery in Brooklyn, and the Pepsi-Cola sign in Long Island City (above).

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Landmarks Preservation Commission approves 45-acre senior housing development in Staten Island

New York City Farm Colony. (Flickr / ataferner)

New York City Farm Colony. (Flickr / ataferner)

Staten Island’s abandoned, graffiti-covered, New York Farm Colony is poised to become “Landmark Colony”—a mixed-use development with retail and 350 units of senior housing. Curbed reported that plans for the 45-acre project were unanimously approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) after updated designs were unveiled by Vengoechea + Boyland Architecture late last month. Read More

BKSK-Designed Topper for the Meatpacking District Gets Landmarks’ Blessing

BKSK's revised design for 9-19 9th Avenue. (BKSK Architects)

BKSK’s revised design for 9-19 9th Avenue. (BKSK Architects)

And another glass and metal addition is set to rise atop a low-rise building in the Meatpacking District. The Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) has voted to approve the BKSK-designed topper to the two-story building at 9–19 9th Avenue, which is best known for housing Keith McNally’s famous French bistro, Pastis. Continue reading after the jump.

Rizzoli Bookstore to Likely Lose Their Manhattan Home

Development, East, Preservation
Friday, March 28, 2014
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Rizzoli Bookstore. (Garrett Ziegler / Flickr)

Rizzoli Bookstore. (Garrett Ziegler / Flickr)

New York City will soon lose another one of its bookstores—at least temporarily. The Landmarks Preservation Commission has denied landmark status for 31 West 57th Street, the century old building that houses the truly iconic Rizolli Bookstore. This clears the way for the building’s owners to demolish the current structure and put up what is expected to be a commercial or residential tower— this is 57th Street, after all. The owners of the building are reportedly trying to find a new home for Rizolli.

 

Keeping Up With the Super-Tall Joneses: SHoP Designs Another Manhattan Skyscraper

East, Newsletter
Monday, September 9, 2013
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(Courtesy SHoP)

(Courtesy SHoP)

Manhattan’s 57th Street continues its ascent as New York City’s new gold coast with a skinny skyscraper unveiled by SHoP Architects and JDS Development today. SHoP most recently celebrated the groundbreaking of another skyscraper for JDS along the East River, but has now been tapped to build a lean, luxury high-rise on West 57th Street that could climb to a whopping 1,350 feet tall.

Continue reading after the jump.

New York City Council Approves Hudson Square Rezoning.  Aerial view of Hudson Square. (Courtesy Hudson Square BID) Development is soon on the horizon for Hudson Square, the 18-block area sandwiched between Soho and Tribeca. Yesterday New York City Council approved the Hudson Square rezoning, which entails raising the allowable building height to pave the way for more residential and mixed-use development. The city was able to finagle more affordable housing and open space throughout the approval process. From the get-go, preservationists have feared that development will seep into the South Village and have pressed the city to landmark the entire district. City Council has worked out a deal with Landmarks Preservation Commission to vote on the northern section of South Village by the end of the year.

 

Landmarks Greenlights Proposal for DUMBO’s First Townhouses.  Rendering of townhouses (Courtesy of Alloy Development) After implementing a few small changes to the original design, Alloy Development has won the approval of the Landmarks Preservation Commission to build the first set of townhouses in DUMBO. The developer modified the height of the five-story residential complex by eliminating a screen on the roof level that was designed to keep out noise and maintain a certain acoustic level in the penthouse units. Now the 3,000-square-foot project needs the approval of Department of Buildings, but AJ Pires of Alloy anticipates that they will be able to break ground by this summer. (Rendering: Courtesy Alloy Development)

 

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