Kenneth Caldwell on designer chatter at the Monterey Design Conference

Architecture, Interiors, Review, West
Wednesday, October 28, 2015
MDC 2015 Master of Ceremonies, Reed Kroloff.(Courtesy AIACC)

MDC 2015 Master of Ceremonies, Reed Kroloff.(Courtesy AIACC)

This year’s Monterey Design Conference could have been titled the “Monterey Design Short Video Clip Festival.” For as long as I can remember, most of the presentations at the conference have followed the same formula: show slides of recent work and explain them. But now most of the speakers are trying to tell a more nuanced story, informed by our mobile-app/social-media/you-are-never-offline age. Sometimes it worked, sometimes it didn’t. I checked in with attendees to get their impressions.

More after the jump.

Monterey Becomes Eclectic: Lessons from the Monterey Design Conference

Architecture, Design, West
Tuesday, October 20, 2015
Architects gather for the 2015 Monterey Design Conference held at Julia Morgan's Asilomar. (Courtesy @rjcarch/ Instagram)

Architects gather for the 2015 Monterey Design Conference held at Julia Morgan’s Asilomar. (Courtesy @rjcarch/ Instagram)

A weekend at the 2015 Monterey Design Conference (MDC) held at Asilomar leads to a wealth and variety of insights about architecture and design. Including a lesson in “uglyful,” says Guy Horton.

Read about the conference after the jump.

First Lexus Design Award Winners Reimagine Motion

"INAHO" lighting concept by Tangent (Hideki Yoshimoto and Yoshinaka Ono)

“INAHO” lighting concept by Tangent. (Hideki Yoshimoto and Yoshinaka Ono)

Have you ever found yourself thinking: “If only they had invented a/an—insert really clever device here—my life would be so much better?” For instance, a “clam kayak” that you could serenely float along in after a long week at work, or a “slide bridge” that offered the option to well, slide, rather then walk down a flight of stairs. It sounds too good to be true, but these inventive concepts were just two out of the twelve winning submissions of the first Lexus Design Award competition.

Continue reading after the jump.

Second that Motion: Lexus Jumps In the Auto-Design-Award Game

Eavesdroplet, International
Wednesday, December 26, 2012

Check your rearview mirrors, Audi. The Japan-based luxury car company Lexus recently announced the launch of a new design award that calls for proposals on the theme of “Motion”: ”Our daily lives are continuously filled with motion. The motion of things, the motion of people. Moving people’s hearts. Shifting consciousness…” You get the idea. And it’s one that may ring a bell—the theme of this year’s Audi Urban Design Award was “Mobility.”

In an intriguing twist, architect Junya Ishigami of Tokyo, one of the 2012 Audi award finalists who dropped out of that competition before the October judging, has now reappeared as a “mentor” to the Lexus award. There’s the requisite big-name panel of judges (Antonelli, Ito, and more), and a five million yen (about $60,000) prize for each of ten winners. Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, Audi.

Venice 2010> Has the Biennale Outlived its Usefulness?

Thursday, September 2, 2010

The Cherry Blossom Pavilion, in the Italian pavilion, one of the increasingly rare examples of architecture at the biennale. (Bill Menking)

The 2010 Venice architecture biennale closed on Saturday—at least for media representatives, as journalists were required for the first time to turn in their press passes and enter as public citizens (tickets, $25). I hated giving up that pass as it allowed me access to the exhibitions both at the Arsenale and in the giardini, home of the national pavilions. Though Venice is hardly a major military installation there are canals in the area that are off-limits to civilians; a water taxi driver informed my group that only a special permit would get us into the canal so I produced my press pass and he said “va bene” and he drove us up the canal. The power of the press! Read More

Venice 2010> Storming the Arsenale & Rem in da Haas

Rem Koolhaas, winner of this year’s Golden Lion, at the Arsenale. (Bill Menking)

Nothing much to report from yesterday, as it was a day of formal openings when very little was in fact open to the press or public. It was mostly a day of introductory speeches by biennale directors and city and government officials. Frank Gehry presented some models, made a few brief remarks, and then everyone headed for the hallway, where we had our first free prosecco and great little appetizers. Journalists and media types stood around asking about where the best parties were to be had in the coming days (more on this later). Read More

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