Sandhogs continue to make progress on New York City’s enormous $11 billion East Side train tunnel

(MTA Capital Construction / Rehema Trimiew)

(MTA Capital Construction / Rehema Trimiew)

New York City’s MTA has posted another collection of East Side Access construction photos to remind New Yorkers that its majorly delayed and hugely over budget project is still actually chugging along. When East Side Access is ultimately completed, at the cost of nearly $11 billion, it will connect Long Island Rail Road trains to Grand Central making life easier for about 80,000 commuters. But that’s a long ways off—last we heard, the project will not be completed until 2023.

Check out construction progress after the jump.

Twin Cities architects will pay you $5,000 to take this piece of the Minneapolis skyway

This defunct chunk of the minneapolis skyway is currently gathering dust. (citydeskstudio)

This defunct chunk of the minneapolis skyway is currently gathering dust. (citydeskstudio)

Minneapolis architects CityDeskStudio are sitting on an iconic piece of Twin Cities infrastructure. Almost a decade ago they acquired a defunct chunk of the city’s elevated pedestrian network, the Minneapolis Skyway. Years later they’re still wondering what to do with it, which could be to your benefit if you’re in the market for a 140-ton steel box designed by Ed Baker.

You don’t need deep pockets, either. In fact, they’ll pay you $5,000 to haul it away.

Continue reading after the jump.

Chicago’s Wilson CTA Station gets a $203 million makeover

(Courtesy CTA)

(Courtesy CTA)

Patrons of the Chicago Transit Authority‘s 91-year-old Wilson station (above) on the El’s Red Line will be happy to learn the city broke ground this week on its long-planned, $203 million Wilson Station Reconstruction Project. The track structure is more than 100 years old.

Continue reading after the jump.

Cleveland lands 2016 Republican National Convention

Midwest, National, News
Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Located adjacent to the Burnham Malls, Cleveland's Medical Mart is surrounded by early-twentieth-century limestone structures. (Ed LaCasse, LaCasse Photography)

Located adjacent to the Burnham Malls, Cleveland’s Medical Mart is surrounded by early-twentieth-century limestone structures. The Republican National Committee will host its 2016 convention in the city of Cleveland. (Ed LaCasse, LaCasse Photography)

The Republican National Committee (RNC) selected Cleveland this week for the site of their upcoming convention. Cleveland beat out Dallas with a bipartisan lobbying effort that lasted months. At their 2016 convention Republicans will nominate a candidate for President, hoping to regain the White House after eight years of Democratic leadership.

But what does it mean for Cleveland?

Twin Cities celebrate first inter-city rail connection in decades

Minneapolis Metro Transit Trains at Target Field Station. (Mark Danielson / Flickr)

Minneapolis Metro Transit Trains at Target Field Station. (Mark Danielson / Flickr)

For a metro area as widely praised for its alternative transportation options as Minnesota’s Twin Cities, it’s surprising Minneapolis and St. Paul are only now celebrating a new light rail connection between their downtowns. Read More

Minneapolis breaks ground on massive downtown east development

Minneapolis developers broke ground May 13 on a mixed-use development in Downtown East. (Ryan companies/DML)

Minneapolis developers broke ground May 13 on a mixed-use development in Downtown East. (Ryan companies/DML)

Earlier this month, workers broke ground on the largest Twin Cities real estate development project in two decades. Budding off a new stadium for the Minnesota Vikings, designed by HKS, locally based Ryan Companies saw an opportunity to redefine the Minneapolis neighborhood of Downtown East.

Continue reading after the jump.

Chicago breaks ground on Navy Pier flyover for Lakefront Trail

navy pier flyover rendering (city of chicago)

navy pier flyover rendering (city of chicago)

Bicyclists and pedestrians cruising down Chicago’s 18-mile Lakefront Trail generally enjoy an exceptionally open, continuous and scenic path along Lake Michigan. But near Navy Pier they’re shunted inland, underneath a highway, onto sidewalks and through road crossings that interrupt their journey in the middle of one of the popular pathway’s most congested corridors.

The Navy Pier Flyover, announced in 2011, was designed to remedy that situation, and today Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced the project has officially broken ground. Read More

Chicago’s Divvy bikeshare wants your help placing new stations

A screenshot of Divvy stations, in blue, and suggestions in green. (Divvy)

A screenshot of Divvy stations, in blue, and suggestions in green. (Divvy)

Chicago’s Divvy bikesharing program wants your help placing new bicycle rental stations throughout the city. The Divvy Siting Team will consider your suggestions at suggest.divvybikes.com—they’ve already mapped many public suggestions alongside the 300 existing stations.

Last month the program announced its intent to become North America’s largest bikesharing system. Divvy will add 175 stations by the end of 2014 and, pending state and federal funding, bring another 75 online after that, raising the total to 550 stations.

As it expands, Divvy could address previous criticisms about equal access. Though it started by focusing on the Loop and other high-density downtown areas, the program has expanded into many neighborhoods. Still, many are unserved—Uptown is the northern terminus, while much of the West, Southwest, and South Sides have no stations.

Video> Ray LaHood Says Congress is Scared to Make Infrastructure Investments

City Terrain, National
Monday, December 9, 2013
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After the fatal MetroNorth crash in New York City last week, former Obama administration Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood claimed that Washington is “afraid” to invest in transportation infrastructure improvement. On MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” program, LaHood said the recent train tragedy was only another example of the problems lurking in America’s infrastructure and that the $48 billion set for transportation use by the economic recovery plan was “not enough money,” something Congressional members later acknowledged. Only in states where the people have voted for infrastructure referendums is progress occurring. He called for nationwide leadership to follow suit.

Bjarke Ingels Reinvents the Bridge as a Mountain of Landscaped Trails

City Terrain, International
Tuesday, October 29, 2013
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(Courtesy BIG)

(Courtesy BIG)

The Swedish Transport Administration launched a conceptual design competition in 2011 for a new bridge in Skuru, Sweden. The competition received great national and international response, including one fanciful proposal by Danish firm, Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG). The competition brief stated that the new bridge should adhere to high aesthetic standards and coincide with the existing bridge and the surrounding valuable cultural and natural landscape. Ingels deploys his characteristic hedonistic sustainability to bring nature onto the bridge itself.

Continue reading after the jump.

Boston Unveils New Map of “The T” Subway System

City Terrain, East
Monday, October 14, 2013
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Winner of New Perspectives Map Re-design Competition by Mikheil Kvrivishvili (Courtesy of MBTA/Mikheil Kvrivishvili)

Winner of New Perspectives Map Re-design Competition by Mikheil Kvrivishvili (Courtesy of MBTA/Mikheil Kvrivishvili)

Navigating Boston’s subway system, known as “The T,” will soon be a cinch with the help of a new map designed by Mikheil Kvrivishvili. The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) named the Moscow-based interactive/graphic designer the winner of its “New Perspectives Map Re-design Competition” after receiving 6,837 out of the 17,045 votes cast by the public. A panel of experts—composed of MBTA officials, academics, urban planners, and cartographers—selected six finalists from a pool of dozens of applicants. Members of the public then voted online for their favorite design.

Continue reading after the jump.

New Orleans Unveils Urban Water Plan That Embraces Flooding

City Terrain, Southwest
Wednesday, September 18, 2013
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nola-urban-water-plan-07bnola-urban-water-plan-07a

 

On September 9th, New Orleans unveiled an innovative proposal for flood management: the New Orleans Greater Water Plan. Designed by Dutch engineers and led by chief architect and planner David Waggonner of locally-based firm Waggonner & Ball Architects, the plan seeks to mitigate the damages caused during heavy rainfalls. The concept is simple: keeping water in pumps and canals instead of draining and pumping it out. The idea is to retain the water in order to increase the city’s groundwater, thereby slowing down the subsidence of soft land as it dries and shrinks.

Continue reading after the jump.

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