Pedal Power: London could soon have more cyclists than motorists on its streets

(Tejvan Pettinger / Flickr)

(Tejvan Pettinger / Flickr)

Since the turn of the century, the number of motorists in London more than halved from 137,000 to 64,000. In the same period, cyclist numbers trebled from 12,000 to 36,000, showing that more commuters are increasingly choosing two wheels over four to get to work.

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Enrique Peñalosa plans to give Bogotá the best transit system in the developing world

Enrique on a bus headed from Denver to Boulder (ITDP / Flickr)

Enrique on a bus headed from Denver to Boulder. (itdp / Flickr)

An economist who once advised Colombian President Virgilio Barco, Enrique Peñalosa is now a revered urban planner in the city of Bogotá. Having once served as Bogotá mayor from 1997 to 2001, Peñalosa is now back for his second stint and pledges to provide his city with the best public transportation system in the developing world.

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Anything but boring: World’s largest tunnelling machine, Big Bertha, is stuck under Seattle, Tweets an interview

A close-up view of Bertha’s cutterhead. Flickr / WSDOT CC BY 2.0

A close-up view of Bertha’s cutterhead. (Flickr / WSDOT)

Big Bertha, Seattle’s famous tunnel boring machine, is stuck underground again. Bertha was running for just under a month following a two year delay to fix a broken cutter head. And the machine has taken to Twitter, as we imagine it can get lonely so far beneath the city.

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Governor Cuomo unveils ambitious plans to overhaul New York’s Penn Station

City Terrain, East, News, Urbanism
Friday, January 8, 2016
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(Courtesy NYS Governor's Office)

Aerial view of the Empire State Complex (Courtesy NYS Governor’s Office)

The lead-up to New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo‘s State of the State address feels like a government-backed encore of “The Twelve Days of Christmas.” Instead of lords a-leaping and swans a-swimming, Cuomo brings infrastructure upgrades a-plenty in his 2016 Agenda.

The governor promised funds to the Gateway and East Side Access tunnels, the Javits Center, new Metro-North stations in the Bronx, the MTA (wi-fi a-comin’!), and an airport on Long Island. Arguably the biggest proposal is the Empire State Complex, a $3 billion redevelopment of New York City’s Penn Station and its surroundings.

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OMA selected to design The Factory, a major arts complex in Manchester, England

(Courtesy OMA)

(Courtesy OMA)

After fending off  Rafael Viñoly, Zaha Hadid, Nicholas Grimshaw, Haworth Tompkins Limited and compatriots Mecanoo, OMA‘s design for “The Factory” will become Manchester’s new art house. Lead by Rem Koolhaas, The Factory will be in the British city’s center and is touted to cost $166 million with a further $13.5 million-a-year to run.

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Japanese government to fund a maglev train line between DC and Baltimore

East, News, Transportation
Wednesday, November 11, 2015
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The JR Maglev train, used on the experimental Yamanashi railway that US state and federal officials rode in trip to Japan last spring (Courtesy t-mizo / Flickr)

The JR Maglev train, used on the experimental Yamanashi Maglev Test Track that US officials rode on trip to test the technology in Japan last spring (Courtesy t-mizo / Flickr)

You can do a lot in fifteen minutes: cook some surf-and-turf, blast through paperwork, star in a mediocre crime drama, or travel 40 miles between major East Coast cities. Well, not yet. Given the excruciatingly slow pace of infrastructure modernization in the U.S., there will be a wait on that last one, probably for decades.

Yet, the U.S. is taking small steps towards twenty-first century transportation. Last week, the U.S. Transportation Department granted $27.8 million in Federal Railroad Administration funds to the Maryland Department of Transportation and the Maryland Economic Development Corporation to conduct feasibility studies for a maglev train line that will run between DC and BaltimoreRead More

Tonight! Join AN’s Matt Shaw in exploring energy, politics, and architecture in New York

W57 by BIG, part of the "Lifestyle" section of the book. Drawing by Janette Kim and Erik Carver (Courtesy Princeton Architectural Press)

W57 by BIG, part of the “Lifestyle” section of the book. Drawing by Janette Kim and Erik Carver (Courtesy Princeton Architectural Press)

Tonight, Monday, November 9, at New York’s AIANY/Center for Architecture, AN Senior Editor Matt Shaw will be moderating a book talk between Janette Kim and Erik Carver, the authors of The Underdome Guide to Energy Reform, a new book released by Princeton Architectural Press. Stop by at 6:00p.m. tonight for light refreshments and beautiful drawings alongside a discussion about the future of ecologically minded architecture and urbanism.

More info after the jump.

Oslo plans to make its city center free from cars in four years

Köpcentret Oslo City (Jenny Andersson, News Øresund / Flickr)

Köpcentret Oslo City (Jenny Andersson, News Øresund / Flickr)

Norway currently boasts three World Rally Championship drivers (second only to France), all of considerable pedigree, yet its capital city of Oslo is planning to remove cars for good. Along with the proposal to ban cars is the plan to build 37 miles worth of bike lanes by 2019 and a new system for handicap bus services and delivery vehicles.

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Report: Red tape and deferred maintenance balloon U.S. infrastructure costs to $3.7 trillion

City Terrain, National, News, Transportation
Wednesday, September 16, 2015
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The overhead steel truss on a pair of I-5 bridges spanning the Skookumchuck River in Washington State is one piece of infrastructure getting overdue repairs. Hits from overheight loads will be fixed and the overhead clearance will be straightened out to and even height across all lanes. (Washington State Department of Transportation)

The overhead steel truss on a pair of I-5 bridges spanning the Skookumchuck River in Washington State is one piece of infrastructure getting overdue repairs. Hits from overheight loads will be fixed and the overhead clearance will be straightened out to and even height across all lanes. (Washington State Department of Transportation via Flickr)

A new report attempts to quantify the cost of our national reluctance to fix aging bridges, railroads and power lines. Delays in approving infrastructure projects cost the United States some $3.7 trillion, according to the nonpartisan think tank Common Good—more than twice what it would take to fix the infrastructure in the first place, according to a report titled Two Years, Not Ten Years: Redesigning Infrastructure Approvals.

Continue reading after the jump.

Indiana draws conservative ire for $55 million 200th birthday bash and bicentennial plaza by MKSK

Plans for a new fountain at Indiana's Bicentennial Plaza  in Indianapolis. (MKSK Studios)

Plans for a new fountain at Indiana’s Bicentennial Plaza in Indianapolis. (MKSK Studios)

Hoosiers, if you didn’t get a gift for Indiana on the occasion of its 200th birthday next year, don’t fret—state and local governments have pledged tens of millions in infrastructure investments and new buildings for the Bicentennial. The state’s share carries a total value of more than $55 million, inviting criticism from fiscal conservatives.

Continue reading after the jump.

Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill selected for high-tech overhaul in South Bend, Indiana

(Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill)

(Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill)

Union Station Technology Center (USTC) in South Bend, Indiana began its life as a train station. Now it’s a data center and the state’s second largest carrier hotel. As a piece of internet infrastructure, it’s high tech. With the help of Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture, the building owners are aiming for a design to suit.

Continue reading after the jump.

Orphaned segment of Minneapolis skyway destined for art installation, modernist lakeside home

(Dream the Combine)

(Dream the Combine)

In February, a Twin Cities design firm advertised an unusual yard sale of sorts. CityDeskStudio offered to pay $5,000 to whomever could haul away and repurpose an 84-foot long section of Minneapolis‘ famous skyway system that once spanned South 5th Street. The skyway segment is now headed to a private residence in Brainerd, Minnesota—but not before playing host to a contemplative art installation that examines the philosophical dimensions of this defunct piece of pedestrian infrastructure.

COntinue reading after the jump.

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