Tigerman’s Epiphany: New photomontage update of “Titanic” unveiled at the Chicago Architecture Biennial

Architecture, Art, Midwest, News, On View
Wednesday, November 4, 2015
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Stanley Tigerman's follow up to his iconic 1978 "Titanic" image. Courtesy Chicago Architecture Club

Stanley Tigerman’s follow up to his iconic 1978 “Titanic” collage. (Courtesy Chicago Architecture Club)

On October 22nd, marking the 130th anniversary of the Chicago Architecture Club and as part of the ongoing Chicago Architecture Foundation‘s Currencies of Architecture exhibition, Stanley Tigerman unveiled a follow up to his 1978 “Titanic” photomontage. Entitled “The Epiphany,” the new image, somewhat ironically, is a protest against what Tigerman sees as a contemporary infatuation with icons.

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Perkins+Will’s Bryan Schabel on updating historic campus architecture

The University of Chicago. (Luiz Gadelha, Jr. / Flickr)

The University of Chicago. (Luiz Gadelha, Jr. / Flickr)

Among the Windy City’s most well-known assets are its universities, from DePaul in Lincoln Park and the Loop to the University of Chicago in Hyde Park. Many of these campuses, in turn, are characterized by heavy brick and stone architecture in the Neo-Gothic style. The dominance of a single architectural style—a feature of many institutions of higher learning, not just Chicago‘s—presents a challenge to contemporary architects, who must combine a sensitivity to the existing campus fabric with the imperatives of contemporary college life.

Continue reading after the jump.

Eavesdrop> Chicago’s Crater: Is Bjarke Ingels working on a scheme at the Chicago Spire site?

Development, Eavesdroplet, Midwest
Thursday, October 22, 2015
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(Photo by Claire Iltis / Flickr; Montage by AN)

(Photo by Claire Iltis / Flickr; Montage by AN)

Since 2008, there has been a giant hole where Santiago Calatrava’s Chicago Spire was supposed to rise some 2,000 feet out of the ground. The project lapsed due to financial woes by Irish developer Garrett Kelleher. The foundation is in place, and it looks like a place where a giant swimming pool or music venue would fit nicely, but AN is hearing that developers are working with Bjarke Ingels’ Danish firm BIG on a possible Spire part to.

Letter> State of what art? Patrik Schumacher rails against the Chicago Architecture Biennial

Amanda Williams’ Color(ed) Theory. (Courtesy Chicago Architecture Biennial)

Amanda Williams’ Color(ed) Theory. (Courtesy Chicago Architecture Biennial)

[Editor’s Note: Opinions expressed in letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions or sentiments of the newspaper. AN welcomes reader letters, which could appear in our regional print editions. To share your opinion, please email editor@archpaper.com]

The State of the Art of Architecture, delivered by the Chicago Architecture Biennial Exhibition, must leave lay-visitors bewildered by one overwhelming subliminal message: Contemporary architecture has ceased to exist, the discipline’s guilt and bad conscience has sapped its vitality, driven it to self-annihilation, and architects have now en masse dedicated themselves to doing good via basic social work.

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Facades+ Chicago workshops offer hands-on exposure to cutting-edge concepts and techniques

Facades+ comes to the Windy City November 5-6. (Roman Boed / Flickr)

Facades+ comes to the Windy City November 5-6. (Roman Boed / Flickr)

Among the many continuing education opportunities available to members of the AEC industry, the Facades+ conference series stands out for a number of reasons.

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Postmodern Purgatory: Illinois Governor announces plan to sell Helmut Jahn’s Thompson Center

ILLINOIS GOVERNOR RAUNER ANNOUNCES STATE’S PLAN TO SELL CHICAGO’S POSTMODERN ICON. (Photo by Rainer Viertlboeck)

ILLINOIS GOVERNOR RAUNER ANNOUNCES STATE’S PLAN TO SELL CHICAGO’S POSTMODERN ICON. (Photo by Rainer Viertlboeck)

Hot on the heels of round table discussions of the preservation of Postmodern monuments at the Chicago Architecture Biennial. One of Chicago’s most iconic and controversial Postmodern landmarks finds itself on unsure footing. The James R. Thompson Center, designed by Helmut Jahn and constructed in 1985, was the site of a press conference held by Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner to announce the proposed sale of the building.

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SOM’s Neil Katz on parametric modeling in facade design

Parametric model of structural system for a very early version of Tower One of the World Trade Center project, New York. (Courtesy Neil Katz)

Parametric model of structural system for a very early version of Tower One of the World Trade Center project, New York. (Courtesy Neil Katz)

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) associate Neil Katz describes his approach to crafting facades as involving a “computational design” methodology.

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Eavesdrop> Blown Over in the Windy City

Architecture, Eavesdroplet, Midwest
Thursday, October 8, 2015
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Selgascano and helloeverything at the Chicago Architecture Biennial. (Courtesy CAB)

Selgascano and helloeverything at the Chicago Architecture Biennial. (Courtesy CAB)

A juicy tidbit from the Chicago Architecture Biennial. The number of projects in the Chicago Cultural Center right now is a bit dizzying, but we can only imagine what the place was like during the installation. It is a small miracle that it all fit, let alone got assembled correctly. The process was not without snafus.

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Kissing Constructs: Barbara Kasten’s surreal photography at the Chicago Architecture Biennial

Art, International, Midwest, Newsletter, On View
Wednesday, October 7, 2015
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Barbara Kasten's all-analog photography from the 1980's is on display at the Graham Foundation in Chicago. (Bika Rebek/AN)

Barbara Kasten’s all-analog photography from the 1980’s is on display at the Graham Foundation in Chicago. (Courtesy Graham Foundation)

Thursday night, Barbara Kasten’s first major retrospective opened at the Graham Foundation as an offsite event of the Chicago Architecture Biennial. Set in the Madlener house, a turn-of-the century Prairie-Style mansion, the exhibition brings together a roughly chronological overview of the artist’s practice from the 1970s until today. The works on display are of an astonishingly contemporary quality—many of the framed photographs follow the aesthetic paradigms of current net—or Tumblr art featuring primitive geometric shapes of varying surface texture lit in a rich palette of pastel colors forming surreal spatial compositions.

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Matthew Johnson on the Reemergence of Craft in the Digital Age

SGH engineered a timber-mullion curtain wall with novel timber moment connection for a cantilevered canopy at Cooper Gallery, with Marc Truant & Associates and David Adjaye Associates. (Courtesy Simpson Gumpertz & Heger)

SGH engineered a timber-mullion curtain wall with novel timber moment connection for a cantilevered canopy at Cooper Gallery, with Marc Truant & Associates and David Adjaye Associates. (Courtesy Simpson Gumpertz & Heger)

For much of its early history, architecture was more than a pragmatic response to the problem of shelter. It was infused by craft. “Craft has existed in all kinds of industry, especially architecture, for a long time,” said Simpson Gumpertz & Heger (SGH) principal Matthew Johnson. “But I feel it it lost its way in the twentieth century as we chased efficiency over quality.”

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Here’s what AN’s editors say on day two of the Chicago Architecture Biennial

Architecture, Midwest, On View
Saturday, October 3, 2015
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Theaster Gates and the Rebuild Foundation's Stony Island Arts Bank (Matt Shaw/AN)

Theaster Gates and the Rebuild Foundation’s Stony Island Arts Bank (Matt Shaw/AN)

Day two at the Chicago Architecture Biennial continued to deliver with a mix of the best international talent and local practitioners who are rethinking the way we build our cities. We were on the ground battling the wind in the crisp Chicago fall. Here are some of our favorite things we found.

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Performances rule the day at the Chicago Architecture Biennial

We Know How to Order by Bryony Roberts and the South Shore Drill Team (Mimi Zeiger/AN)

We Know How to Order by Bryony Roberts and the South Shore Drill Team (Mimi Zeiger/AN)

Performance has been the breakout surprise of the Chicago Architecture Biennial. While many of the works inside the Chicago Cultural Center grapple with issues of urbanism, politics, and the resonances of Modernism (especially Mies’ oversized presence in the city) in contemporary culture, the three performances included in the opening weekend program address and embody what is at stake. Read More

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