DXU Delivers Luxe Minimalism in Dekton

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DXU wrapped Porsche Design's Oak Brook, Illinois boutique in a matte black Dekton rain screen. (Courtesy Cosentino)

DXU wrapped Porsche Design’s Oak Brook, Illinois boutique in a matte black Dekton rain screen. (Courtesy Cosentino)

Sleek black rain screen reflects Porsche Design’s understated style.

In the world of high-end retail, first impressions matter. Knowing this, DXU, LLC principal Eric Styer took special care selecting a facade material for the Porsche Design boutique in Oak Brook, Illinois. Read More

Here’s how students from IIT used cutting edge technology to craft a rippling carbon fiber facade

CARBONskin was designed and fabricated by IIT students this spring. (Courtesy Alphonso Peluso)

CARBONskin was designed and fabricated by IIT students this spring. (Courtesy Alphonso Peluso)

Though only one semester had elapsed since the student-designed and fabricated FIBERwave carbon fiber pavilion went up, by early 2015 IIT professor Alphonso Peluso was hungry for more.

Continue reading after the jump.

Navy Pier’s new “Wave Wall” by nArchitects lays a modern Spanish Steps at the foot of a Ferris wheel

Navy Pier's new "Wave Wall" (nARCHITECTS)

Navy Pier’s new “Wave Wall” (nARCHITECTS)

Navy Pier is three years into a $278 million overhaul, and the new face of Illinois’ most visited tourist attraction is beginning to emerge—most recently a grand staircase titled “Wave Wall” washed over the foot of the pier’s famous ferris wheel.

COntinue reading after the jump.

This urban intervention in Chicago would let citizens control colorful lights under the “El” with their smartphones

City Terrain, Lighting, Midwest, Urbanism
Wednesday, July 22, 2015
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Wabash Lights, a site-specific installation under Chicago's L. (Courtesy Wabash Lights)

Wabash Lights, a site-specific installation under Chicago’s L. (Courtesy Wabash Lights)

Chicago is best known for Wrigley Field and the Sears Tower (yes, the Sears Tower), but one of its most prominent urban features is the elevated train tracks that form the “Loop,” or the downtown area bound by this snaking steel goliath. However poetic the idea of the “El” might be, it brute steel structure could, like most raised infrastructures, use some improvements.

More after the jump.

VDTA’s Taut-Skinned Godfrey Hotel

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VDTA's Godfrey Hotel features a slick skin of insulated metal panels and glass. (Steve Hall)

VDTA’s Godfrey Hotel features a slick skin of insulated metal panels and glass. (Steve Hall)

Metal and glass accentuate Chicago high-rise’s iconic form.

Given the odds stacked against it, Godfrey Hotel’s 2014 opening in Chicago counts as a major victory—even if it took more than a decade to get there. Valerio Dewalt Train Associates (VDTA) signed on to the project in 2003, after being approached by a developer affiliated with a mid-market hospitality chain.

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Developers tap Perkins + Will principal to help redevelop site adjacent to Bertrand Goldberg’s River City

Bertrand Goldberg's River City, in Chicago. (S. N. Johnson-Roehr via Flickr)

Bertrand Goldberg’s River City, in Chicago. (S. N. Johnson-Roehr via Flickr)

Plans for 2,700 new homes along the Chicago River have some neighbors and realtors calling a long-vacant lot near the Willis Tower by a new name. “River South” refers to a few sites, among them: a 7.3-acre riverside parcel between Harrison Street and the River City condo complex designed by Bertrand Goldberg. Read More

Gallery> Tour the rehabbed Chicago Motor Club, a Henry Ford–era art deco mecca for motorists

The new Hampton Inn Chicago Michigan Avenue, which occupies the former Chicago Motor Club building. (Kenny Kim Photography)

The new Hampton Inn Chicago Michigan Avenue, which occupies the former Chicago Motor Club building. (Kenny Kim Photography)

You can credit Chicago’s recent boom in boutique hotels with revving up an historic 16-story building once home to the Chicago Motor Club, which rolled back onto the market in May as a Hampton Inn.

Continue reading after the jump.

Take a tour of Chicago’s newest Green Line stop, Cermak-McCormick Place, designed by Ross Barney Architects

Cermak-McCormick Place: the newest stop on Chicago's CTA Green Line, designed by Ross Barney Architects. (Kate Joyce Studios)

Cermak-McCormick Place: the newest stop on Chicago’s CTA Green Line, designed by Ross Barney Architects. (Kate Joyce Studios)

Chicago commuters transiting through the South Loop and Chinatown have had a new stop since early this year, when the Chicago Transit Authority opened its newest train stop: Cermak-McCormick Place.

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Yoko Ono breaks ground on public art project for Chicago’s South Side

Rendering of the Garden of the Phoenix located in Jackson Park, Chicago with SKY LANDING (circled) and the New Phoenix Pavilion (proposed) and Museum of Science and Industry.

Rendering of the Garden of the Phoenix located in Jackson Park, Chicago with SKY LANDING and the proposed New Phoenix Pavilion and Museum of Science and Industry. (Project 120 Chicago)

The Chicago Park District starts work today on a new project by Yoko Ono. Her first permanent public art installation in the Americas will be a meditation on world peace, harmony with nature, and Japanese-American relations dubbed SKY LANDING, which is slated for a parcel of Jackson Park once home to the historic Phoenix Pavilion.

Continue reading after the jump.

Ride Chicago’s new elevated park and bike path, The 606, with this time-lapse video

606

Scene along the 606. (Courtesy Steven Vance)

Chicago’s long-awaited bikeway and elevated park, The 606, opened last weekend (on 6/6, no less) to a rush of pedestrians and cyclists who were eager to test out the new 2.7-mile trail after years of planning, design and construction. The public park remains extremely popular in the sunny week following its debut.

More after the jump.

Eavesdrop> No resurrection for this near-north-side Chicago church

St. Dominic’s Church in Chicago. (Courtesy Google)

St. Dominic’s Church in Chicago. (Courtesy Google)

The area around Chicago’s former Cabrini-Green public housing project has been a contentious site for a long time, basically in flux since the city first started demolishing it in 1995. Despite Chicago Housing Authority moving decidedly without alacrity to redevelop much of the site, the neighborhood is changing. The latest cue? Developers plan to demolish the long-vacant St. Dominic’s Church on the corner of Locust and Sedgwick.

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The water is so clear right now in Lake Michigan, you can see sunken ships beneath the crystal waves

The 121 foot brig James McBride ran aground during a storm on October 19, 1857. (U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Traverse City)

The 121 foot brig James McBride ran aground during a storm on October 19, 1857. (U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Traverse City)

Winter ice is melting around the Great Lakes, revealing cerulean waters below—and, in northern Lake Michigan, an open graveyard of shipwrecks.

Continue reading after the jump.

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