M-Rad unveils design for a many-colored Hudson Yards hotel

Architecture, East, News, Unveiled
Tuesday, November 10, 2015
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(Courtesy M-Rad Architecture)

(Courtesy M-Rad Architecture)

Though New York has over 100,000 hotel rooms, developers on Manhattan’s Far West Side feel there’s room for more. Matthew Rosenberg, founding principal of Los Angeles–based M-Rad Architecture, has completed the concept design of Hudson Americano, a 740-foot-tall, 160-suite hotel at Hudson Yards. Read More

Topping Out 10 Hudson Yards: KPF’s Manhattan tower reaches new heights

Topping out 10 Hudson Yards (Courtesy Joe Woolhead)

Topping out 10 Hudson Yards (Courtesy Joe Woolhead)

The final bucket of concrete anointed the top of Kohn Pedersen Fox‘s 10 Hudson Yards today. Built to LEED Platinum standards, the 52 story office building, at 30th Street and Tenth Avenue in New York City, is the first of sixteen buildings on the 28 acre site. Read More

Are glass skyscrapers still the way forward?

The Shard, by Renzo Piano, seen in the reflection of another glass skyscraper. ( Courtesy Tez Goodyer / Flickr )

The Shard, by Renzo Piano, seen in the reflection of another glass skyscraper. (Courtesy Tez Goodyer / Flickr)

In the wake of a slew of criticisms on numerous glass skyscrapers’ over-reflective properties, some architects and critics are asking if it’s time to reassess our view on using glass facades in the future.

Continue reading after the jump.

How architects are building a “soil sandwich” to keep plants from cooking at Hudson Yards’ rail-yard-topping Public Square

The 7 train station and green space with the Public Square behind it. (Courtesy Related and Oxford)

The 7 train station and green space with the Public Square behind it. (Courtesy Related and Oxford)

Building America’s largest private real estate development in history would be a tricky proposition whether or not it was taking shape over an active rail yard in the middle of the densest city in the country. But, of course, that is exactly where Hudson Yards—the mega development with those superlative bragging rights—is taking shape.

Continue reading after the jump.

Striking concrete workers stop construction at 30 New York City development sites

Development, East
Wednesday, July 1, 2015
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Hudson Yards as seen from the High Line. (Flickr /  gigi_nyc)

Hudson Yards as seen from the High Line. (Flickr / gigi_nyc)

On Wednesday, construction came to halt at 30 sites in New York City, including Hudson Yards, after cement workers went on strike. Crain’s reported, “At midnight this morning, a collective bargaining agreement ran out between the council of carpenters and a trade organization called the Cement League. The league is made up of contractors that erect the concrete skeletons for high-rise buildings and hire district council workers for part of that job under a collective contract.” As of Wednesday afternoon, the strike was ongoing.

Renderings Revealed for Kevin Roche and Kohn Pedersen Fox’s 55 Hudson Yards Tower

The metallic and glass facade. (Courtesy Related)

The metallic and glass facade. (Courtesy Related)

As with most new towers these days, the offices and apartments rising at Hudson Yards are unsurprisingly wrapped in glossy, glass skins. That is why revised renderings for the new kid on the block, 55 Hudson Yards, are so notable. The 51-story office tower has plenty of floor-to-ceiling windows, but those windows are framed by a metallic grid that encases the entire building. At certain points that metallic wrap disappears as if space has been carved out of the building’s exterior.

Continue reading after the jump.

We’re Bowled Over by James Corner Field Operations’s Plans For the High Line

City Terrain, East
Wednesday, November 13, 2013
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A large, green bowl, dubbed the Spur, will float above the intersection 10th Avenue and 30th Street as part of the final phase of the High Line(Image James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro / Courtesy the City of New York)

A large, green bowl, dubbed the Spur, will float above the intersection 10th Avenue and 30th Street (Image James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro / Courtesy the City of New York)

This week, Friends of the High Line revealed the design concept for the third and final section of the High Line with a tantalizing set of renderings from James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Beginning at the intersection of 10th Avenue and West 30th Street, the latest addition, known as the High Line at the Rail Yards, will wrap westward around Related Companies’ impending Hudson Yards mega-development before culminating on 34th Street between 11th and 12th Avenues.

Continue reading after the jump.

Tunnel Time: Amtrak Tunnel Beneath Hudson Yards Sets Stage For Gateway Project

East
Thursday, March 7, 2013
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Map of the Amtrak Gateway Project. (Hopeful in NJ / Flickr)

Map of the Amtrak Gateway Project. (Hopeful in NJ / Flickr)

Construction on the two-track Gateway project, a new tunnel between New Jersey and Manhattan, will commence this summer beneath Related Company’s Hudson Yards redevelopment site. Related Companies and Amtrak will build this 800-foot-long “box tunnel,” which will first serve as a shell for Amtrak’s rail connection linking the Hudson tunnel to Penn Station’s tracks, and, eventually, to the proposed Moynihan Station. The actual Amtrak Gateway Project is still years away, but construction on this first leg of the tunnel is happening now to coordinate with construction on Manhattan’s West Side. The project will be funded by the federal government including some funding from the Hurricane Sandy relief package meant to help mitigate flooding during future storms. It’s estimated to cost between $120 and $150 million.

In Construction> High Line Construction Reaches into Hudson Yards

East
Friday, February 15, 2013
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Hudson Yards broke ground late last year, but the Kohn Pedersen Fox-designed tower that will one day be the headquarters of fashion-label Coach isn’t the only construction activity causing a buzz on the 26-acre site on Manhattan’s West Side. Wrapping around the south and west sides of the Hudson Yards site, construction crews are busy building out the final segment of the High Line, including sandblasting and refurbishing the steel viaduct, repainting the steel structure’s beams, girders, and columns with the High Line’s signature “Greenblack” color, and removing and storing existing railroad tracks. Landscape construction is expected to begin later this spring.

The Friends of the High Line recently stopped by the construction site with photographer Timothy Schenck to take these photos of work in progress. Be sure to take a look at James Corner Field Operations’ design for the final segment here.

More photos after the jump.

Slideshow> Construction Update at Manhattan’s 7 Line Subway Extention

Construction progress inside the 7 Line subway extension. (Patrick Cashin/Courtesy MTA)

Construction progress inside the 7 Line subway extension. (Patrick Cashin/Courtesy MTA)

Manhattan’s newest neighborhood at Hudson Yards broke ground one week ago today, but the West Side area can be tricky to get to using the city’s existing subway system. In 2014, however, the rumbling of trains far beneath the city’s streets will stretch west from Times Square, extending the 7 Line subway a mile and a half over to 34th Street and 11th Avenue where Hudson Yards’ first tower will be rapidly climbing at 30th Street and 10th Avenue.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) has now shared a series of photos of the $2.4 billion, city-funded project, showing quite a bit of progress since AN toured the site one year ago this month. Most notable are the web of miles of conduit lining the walls and ceilings of the tunnels and the nearly complete ventilation towers rising near the Javits Center. Eventually, interior fit-ups will finish off the station’s sleek interior with curving walls designed by Dattner Architects.

View the full slideshow and a video after the jump.

Hudson Yards Breaks Ground as Manhattan’s Largest Mega-Development

Architecture, East, Newsletter
Thursday, December 6, 2012
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The towers of Hudson Yards. (Courtesy Related)

The towers of Hudson Yards. (Courtesy Related)

Tuesday morning, New York’s top power brokers gathered in a muddy lot on Manhattan’s west side to mark the official groundbreaking of the 26-acre Hudson Yards mega-development. The dramatic addition to the New York skyline will comprise a completely new neighborhood of glass skyscrapers at the northern terminus of the High Line. The South Tower, the first structure to be built and the future headquarters of fashion-label Coach, will rise on the site’s southeast corner at 30th Street and 10th Avenue, where Related CEO Stephen Ross, Mayor Michael Bloomberg, and others celebrated the first turning of dirt as a large caisson machine bored into the ground.

Continue reading after the jump.

Extell Plays Name Games With West Side Tower

East
Tuesday, June 26, 2012
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Extell's One Hudson Yards. (Courtesy Extell)

Extell's One Hudson Yards. (Courtesy Extell)

In what may seem like a backhanded vote of confidence for Related Companies’ Hudson Yards development, Extell’s Gary Barnett has revived plans to build on their parcel at Eleventh Avenue between 33rd and 34th streets and he’s unabashedly naming it “One Hudson Yards.” Like Related’s new Coach tower, Extell’s Kohn Pedersen Fox-designed tower will sit on terra firma, while the majority of Related’s multi-use plan will be built atop the functioning rail yards. The proposed tower would rise 56 stories above the No. 7 line entrance. The compliment missed: Related’s Steve Ross told the New York Post that the name was an attempt to “deceive tenants and the public.”

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