Bjarke Ingels brings the park up to the tower in a new skyscraper at Hudson Yards

Architecture, East, News, Unveiled
Monday, February 8, 2016
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The Spiral. (Courtesy Tishman Speyer)

The Spiral. (Courtesy Tishman Speyer)

In a new Manhattan skyscraper, Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) reinterprets the tower-in-the-park by bringing the park up into the tower.

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Bjarke Ingels’ twin towers along the High Line get a rethink with new twisty renderings

Architecture, East, News
Thursday, January 14, 2016
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(Courtesy BIG)

(Courtesy BIG)

2015 was a big year for for the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), but 2016 may be even BIG-ger. New renderings were revealed this week for 76 Eleventh Avenue, Bjarke Ingels‘ towers on the High Line in New York City. These new views are quite a lot different than images of the diamond-shaped towers that surfaced last November.

Take a look after the jump.

Meet The Green Line: How Perkins Eastman would remake Broadway through Manhattan into a 40-block linear park

(Courtesy Perkins Eastman)

(Courtesy Perkins Eastman)

By now, the “Bilbao Effect” is metonymy for a culture-led revitalization of a postindustrial city driven by a single institution housed in a starchitect-designed complex. The wild success of Manhattan’s High Line generates regional seismic effects—the Lowline, the QueensWay, and the Lowline: Bronx Edition all cite the high queen of linear parks as their inspiration. Upping the ante, Perkins Eastman unfurls the Green Line, a plan to convert one of New York’s busiest streets into a park.

Continue reading after the jump.

The sky’s the limit: Bjarke Ingels lands a pair of slanting towers on the High Line

(Courtesy BIG)

76 Eleventh Avenue (Courtesy BIG)

Clearly, higher ups at the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) are channeling beloved New York rapper Notorious B.I.G.’s approach to urban space. The firm’s recent high-profile commissions (hello, Pittsburgh!) reflect Biggie’s mantra: “the sky is the limit, and [you] know that you can have what you want, be what you want, have what you want, be what you want,” ad infinitum.

Now, Ingels is again looking skyward with a new project along New York’s High Line.

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Aim High, Get Low: New “Lowline” linear park eyed in the Bronx

View of the proposed lowline from Rae Street (Google Maps)

View of the proposed lowline from Rae Street (Google Maps)

Call it High Line fever: since the first leg of James Corner and Diller Scofidio + Renfro’s High Line debuted in 2009, High Line–like projects have popped up all over the city and across the country. Now, not ten miles from the original, the Bronx may be slated for its very own rail-to-park conversion.

More after the jump.

As starchitect-designed condos pop-up along the High Line, Chelsea’s art galleries look for a new home

Architecture, Art, Development, East
Wednesday, September 2, 2015
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September 2014, Chelsea, New York. (Courtesy John Gillespie)

September 2014, Chelsea, New York. (John Gillespie / Flickr)

As rents go up in a city succumbing to gentrification, the few remaining art galleries in Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood have either left or are looking set to leave.

Continue after the jump.

Voila! Zaha Hadid reinvents construction scaffolding with Allongé at her High Line condo tower

Architecture, East
Wednesday, August 19, 2015
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zaha-hadid-luxury-condo-related-companies

(Courtesy Related Companies)

Should you be strolling along the High Line during the next couple weeks, you may encounter a temporary construction shed at the site of Zaha Hadid‘s condominium project going up at 520 West 28th Street.

Continue reading after the jump.

A competing vision to James Corner’s Seattle waterfront plan is going before City Council August 17

Seattle. (stringparts via Flickr Creative Commons)

Seattle. (stringparts via Flickr Creative Commons)

From Boston to San Francisco and cities in between, increasing the quality of livable and usable urban space has become a hot issue. Waterfront redevelopment, highway removal, and linear park creation (and activation) are leading the way.

For Seattle, that means redoing the waterfront by replacing the deteriorating seawall, removing the earthquake damaged Alaskan Way Viaduct, and building a tunnel.

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Peter Marino unveils an unusually restrained High Line condo project

Rendering of the proposed building and the site today. (Courtesy Peter Marino Architect; Google)

Rendering of the proposed building and the site today. (Courtesy Peter Marino Architect; Google)

In the insane race to build more and more luxury condos in New York City, the High Line is staking its claim as the scrappy younger sibling of Billionaire’s Row on 57th Street. The latest addition will be an 8-unit, 47,000 square-foot building by “the leather daddy of luxury,” Peter Marino.

Continue reading after the jump.

Rem Koolhaas is the latest starchitect to join the High Line scene

Rem Koolhaas.

Rem Koolhaas.

It was always a question of when—not if—Rem Koolhaas would join the starchitect party alongside New York City’s High Line. With the third phase of the popular park open, and multiple splashy projects rising alongside it, the New York Post is reporting that Koolhaas’ time has come: he has been hired by The Related Companies to design a building on West 18th Street.

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Video> James Carpenter’s glassy Meatpacking office tower on the High Line gets newly rendered

860 Washington. (Courtesy James Carpenter Design Associates)

860 Washington. (Courtesy James Carpenter Design Associates)

Last week, AN took a walk along the High Line to check in on all the new development happening right alongside New York City’s popular park. One of the structures we saw steadily rising was 860 Washington Street, a 10-story glass office building by James Carpenter Design Associates.

Watch the video after the jump.

Wait, what? New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has never been on the High Line

The High Line. (Flickr / HorsePunchKid)

The High Line. (Flickr / HorsePunchKid)

When the final phase of the High Line opened in September, Mayor de Blasio was not there to celebrate—neither was his Parks Commissioner Mitchell Silver, reported the New York Times. The mayor was off to Pittsburgh that day and Silver apparently had a scheduling conflict so deputies for both men were sent instead. But if the mayor would have made it to the opening, it would have been his first time on the High Line. Ever.

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