Glass and Concrete Arts Center by Machado and Silvetti

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Machado and Silvetti crafted a new theater and studio arts center for Hamilton College in Clinton, New York. (Anton Grassl/Esto)

Hamilton College, Kennedy Center, Location: Clinton NY, Architect: Machado Silvetti Architects

Curved curtain wall and textured composite rain screen create a new focal point on the Hamilton College campus.

When a team of architects from Boston-based Machado and Silvetti Associates first visited Hamilton College several years ago, they thought they were interviewing for a single project—an art museum. But they soon found themselves talking campus officials into a second commission, for the Kennedy Center for Theatre and Studio Arts (KCTSA).

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LS3P Wraps Live Oak Bank in Cypress

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Live Oak Bank's new headquarters features cypress cladding and plentiful glazing. (Mark Herboth Photography)

Live Oak Bank’s new headquarters features cypress cladding and plentiful glazing. (Mark Herboth Photography)

Wood siding and high performance glazing invite nature into the workplace.

For their new headquarters in Wilmington, North Carolina, Live Oak Bank’s leadership sought a design that reflected the institution’s unique culture, particularly its focus on cultivating meaningful relationships with both customers and employees. “Their employees work hard,” reflected LS3P‘s Laura Miller, whose firm was selected to design the building after a small local competition. “The folks who run Live Oak Bank want to recognize that.”
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Perkins+Will Builds a Sustainability Beacon

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Perkins+Will designed UBC's Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability to communicate net positive building strategies. (Martin Tessler / Courtesy Perkins+Will)

Perkins+Will designed UBC’s Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability to communicate net positive building strategies. (Martin Tessler / Courtesy Perkins+Will)

Building technology research center features wood, integrated photovoltaics, and green wall.

When John Robinson began formulating a vision for the University of British Columbia‘s (UBC) Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability (CIRS), he did not start small. Robinson, who is responsible for integrating academic and operational sustainability at the university’s Vancouver campus, dreamed of constructing the most sustainable building in North America, a monument to and testing ground for energy-generating strategies.

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Alpine Factory by Barkow Leibinger

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Barkow Leibinger's HAWE-Werk Kaufbeuren was inspired by Le Corbusier's concept of the "green factory." (David Franck)

Barkow Leibinger’s HAWE-Werk Kaufbeuren was inspired by Le Corbusier’s concept of the “green factory.” (David Franck)

A geometric corrugated metal and glass facade integrates industry and nature.

Barkow Leibinger‘s original scheme for HAWE-Werk Kaufbeuren, developed for a competition several years ago, was “a completely crazy origami thing,” recalled partner Frank Barkow. But upon winning the commission and learning that the factory‘s owners wished to build it in a single phase, “we had to be careful not to kill them with the budget,” he said. “We really dumbed it down.”
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A Glass Wall or a Wall of Glasses? Tre Bicchieri Restaurant Sports a Seemingly Fragile Facade

(Courtesy Carbondale)

(Courtesy Carbondale)

The newly-erected Glass Wall at São Paulo–based fine dining establishment Tre Bicchieri is one of those why-didn’t-someone-think-of-this-before feats of artistry.

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Ag School Update by Urbahn Architects

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Farmingdale State College's new School of Business marks its shift in focus from agriculture to science and technology. (Courtesy Urbahn Architects)

Farmingdale State College’s new School of Business marks the college’s shift in focus from agriculture to science and technology. (Courtesy Urbahn Architects)

Concrete, glass, and brick facade balances the promises of the future with respect for the past.

When Farmingdale State College administrators commissioned Urbahn Architects to design a new building for the School of Business, they positioned it as a beacon for the school’s shift in focus from agriculture to science and technology. But the architects saw a second opportunity in the project: a chance to restore some of the coherence lost during successive campus expansions. Read More

Jaklitsch/Gardner’s Three-Part Ode to Tokyo

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Jaklitsch/Gardner Architects' flagship Tokyo store for Marc Jacobs features a lantern-like, non-occupiable top story sheathed in punched aluminum. (Liao Yusheng)

Jaklitsch/Gardner Architects’ flagship Tokyo store for Marc Jacobs features a lantern-like, non-occupiable top story sheathed in punched aluminum. (Liao Yusheng)

Marc Jacobs flagship store features a tripartite facade of aluminum, tile, and glass.

Commissioned to design Marc Jacobs‘ flagship Tokyo store, Jaklitsch/Gardner Architects‘ first order of business was to rectify the desire for an iconic urban presence with strict local regulations. To make the 2,800-square-meter shop more visible from nearby Omotesando Street, the architects took advantage of a loophole in the building code that allowed them to double the height of the structure as long as the top half was not occupiable. The catch was that the code required a 500-millimeter gap between the occupiable and non-occupiable spaces. “Our first strategy was to create a louvered facade system that would disguise [the divide],” recalled principal Stephan Jaklitsch. But after an afternoon walk through the Imperial gardens, they reversed course. “We were inspired by the vernacular architecture,” said project architect Jonathan Kirk. “We wanted to somehow utilize the language of proportions, but also the materiality within that experience. Rather than trying to create something that was monolithic, we began to look at different materials for each of the building’s components.” The result, called Tōrō Ishi Ku (lantern-rock-void), makes its mark on the city with a tripartite facade in punched aluminum, bespoke tile, and glass.
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Ephemeral Field House by design/buildLAB

Architecture, East, Envelope
Wednesday, March 4, 2015
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Students enrolled in Virginia Tech's design/buildLAB designed and built Sharon Fieldhouse over the course of an academic year. (Jeff Goldberg/ESTO)

Students enrolled in Virginia Tech’s design/buildLAB designed and built Sharon Fieldhouse over the course of an academic year. (Jeff Goldberg/ESTO)

Virginia Tech students demonstrate a light touch with glass and steel pavilion.

The undergraduate architecture students enrolled in Virginia Tech‘s design/buildLAB begin each academic year with an ambitious goal: to bring a community service project from concept through completion by the end of the spring semester. In addition to the usual budget and time constraints, the 15 students taking part in the course during the 2013-2014 school year faced an additional challenge. Their project, a public pavilion for Clifton Forge Little League in the tiny hamlet of Sharon, Virginia, was entirely lacking in contextual cues. “It was interesting because our previous design-build projects have been downtown, with lots of context,” said Keith Zawistowski, who co-founded and co-directs design/buildLAB with his wife, Marie. “Instead, we had a pristine, grassy field with a view of the mountains. We joke that this is our first group of minimalists.” The students’ understated solution—three geometric volumes unified by the consistent use of a vertical sunscreen—turns the focus back to the pavilion‘s surroundings with a restrained material palette of concrete, glass, and steel.
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Des Moines Dialogue by Substance Architecture

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Substance Architecture's pavilion and pump stations are part of Des Moines' Principal Riverwalk development. (Paul Crosby)

Substance Architecture’s pavilion and pump stations are part of Des Moines’ Principal Riverwalk development. (Paul Crosby)

Zinc and glass unite riverfront pavilion and pump house.

In 2009, just as construction on its Principal Riverwalk pavilion was about to begin—and following years of funding-related stops and starts—Des Moines-based Substance Architecture received some unexpected news. The firm was commissioned to design a second building, a pump house, on an abutting plaza. At that point, recalled Substance’s Paul Mankins, it had been about three years since the firm started work on the pavilion. “There was some discussion in the office about whether the pump house should be an independent piece, or whether it should be formally related to the pavilion,” he said. “Our decision was that the pavilion would be stronger if it had this piece as a foil.” Using a limited material palette of zinc and glass accented by Jun Kaneko‘s artwork, Substance succeeded in creating a dialogue between the two small riverfront buildings, despite their differing programs and dates of origin.

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Passive House Laboratory by GO Logic

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The University of Chicago's Warren Woods Ecology Field Station is the first Passive House-certified laboratory in North America. (Trent Bell Photography)

The University of Chicago’s Warren Woods Ecology Field Station is the first Passive House-certified laboratory in North America. (Trent Bell Photography)

Architects deliver a North American first with Warren Woods Ecology Field Station.

When Belfast, Maine–based architecture firm GO Logic presented the University of Chicago‘s Department of Ecology and Evolution with three schematic designs for the new Warren Woods Ecology Field Station, the academics decided to go for broke. Despite being new to Passive House building, the university was attracted to the sustainability standard given the laboratory’s remote location in Berrien County, Michigan. “We presented them with three design options: one more compact, one more aggressive formally,” recalled project architect Timothy Lock. The third option had an even more complicated form, one that would make Passive House certification difficult. “They said: ‘We want the third one—and we want you to get it certified,'” said Lock. “We had our work cut out for us.” Thanks in no small part to an envelope comprising a cedar rain screen, fully integrated insulation system, and high performance glazing, GO Logic succeeded in meeting the aesthetic and environmental goals set down by the university, with the result that the Warren Woods facility is the first Passive House–certified laboratory in North America.

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Unveiled> 41-story office and hotel tower in Chicago’s West Loop

590 W. Madison, an office and hotel tower planned for Chicago's West Loop. (Goettsch Partners)

590 W. Madison, an office and hotel tower planned for Chicago’s West Loop. (Goettsch Partners)

This week an already roiling real estate market in Chicago’s West Loop got hotter still. The latest entrant is a $400 million mixed-use tower designed by Goettsch Partners—a 350-room, four-star hotel beneath about 600,000 square feet of offices that will surely stoke the continued evolution of the area from post-industrial grittiness into a sleek, high-rent hub for technology companies and haute cuisine.

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Sturgess and RJC Soar with Glass Skywalk

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Sturgess Architecture, RJC, and PCL Construction Management crafted a gravity-defying walkway for Jasper National Park. (Courtesy Sturgess Architecture)

Sturgess Architecture, RJC, and PCL Construction Management crafted a gravity-defying walkway for Jasper National Park. (Robert Lemermeyer)

Parabola cantilever walkway delivers park visitors to the brink.

Concerned that visitors to Canada‘s national parks were becoming increasingly disengaged from both the experience of the outdoors and the reality of climate change, Parks Canada launched a search for private-sector initiatives to reverse the trend toward drive-through tourism. Brewster Travel Canada answered the call with a limited design competition for a walkable structure in Jasper National Park‘s Sunwapta Valley. “One of the bus drivers suggested that we do something over this particular gorge, Trickle Creek Canyon—something that could be suspended off the side of the mountain that brought visitors into a more intimate relationship with the Athabasca Glacier and its melting,” explained Sturgess Architecture principal Jeremy Sturgess. With design-build team lead PCL Construction Management and structural engineer Read Jones Christoffersen (RJC), Sturgess’ firm crafted a cantilevered walkway that, clad in weathering steel and glass, defers to its natural surroundings while providing breathtaking views of the glacier and valley floor. Though not a facade itself, Glacier Skywalk warrants discussion within the context of high-performance building envelopes for its innovative structure and streamlined approach to materials—the “+” in Facades+.

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