Lunch at a Landmark: Norman Foster explains the creative process behind his iconic structures

The Millennium Bridge in London

The Millennium Bridge in London. (Dark Dwarf)

On October 7, the New York Landmarks Preservation Foundation hosted its annual “Lunch at a Landmark” at the top of the Hearst Tower. Guests, New York’s elite architectural, design, and preservation cognoscenti, were offered a rare insight into the building—one from Norman Foster himself.

Continue after the jump.

Snøhetta’s exhibit at Berlin’s Aedes explores natural light and human habitat in Norway

Art, International, On View
Friday, September 25, 2015
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(Courtesy Aedes)

(Courtesy Aedes)

The current focus on research in architectural practice normally means thinking out the design and materials of an upcoming project or a prototype for a hoped-for commission. But when Norwegian and American firm Snøhetta was given the chance to do a research project by the Zumtobel Group they created Living The Nordic Light, and it became an exhibition at Berlin’s Aedes Architecture Forum.

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One of these two first prize winners will build the new Bauhaus Museum in Dessau, Germany

Architecture, Awards, International, Newsletter
Wednesday, September 9, 2015
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(Courtesy Bauhaus)

(Courtesy Bauhaus)

In August in Dessau, Germany, a jury in the design competition for the construction of the Bauhaus Museum awarded two first prizes. By a majority vote, the joint winners are from New York and Barcelona with third and fourth place teams hailing from Zürich and Toronto. The design to be constructed from the shortlist of two is yet to be selected.

View the winners after the jump.

The Good, The Bad & The Ugly: Architect builds a shocking pavilion to explore society’s domination of nature

Architecture, Art, International, On View
Tuesday, September 1, 2015
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(Courtesy Atelier Van Lieshout)

(Courtesy Atelier Van Lieshout)

Bochum, Germany is host to Ruhrtriennale, a six week art festival which opened last weekend and gave Joep van Lieshout of Atelier van Lieshout a chance to create his biggest—and most shocking—work to date.

More after the jump.

Construction gone awry: crane driver accidentally extricates a house and causes car pile-up—or that’s what the artists will have you believe

Art, International, Newsletter
Tuesday, August 11, 2015
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(Courtesy of ZKM)

(Courtesy of ZKM)

A house “mistakenly” unearthed from the soil by an inebriated crane driver hangs mournfully over a construction site in Karlsruhe, southern Germany. Torn roots sprout from its base to remind onlookers that it was once a happy home before its violent extrication.

Continue reading after the jump.

JAHN reportedly designing tower for Chicago’s South Loop

Helmut Jahn in the Mansueto Library at the University of Chicago. (Courtesy University of Chicago)

Helmut Jahn in the Mansueto Library at the University of Chicago. (Courtesy University of Chicago)

JAHN (the firm formerly known as Murphy/Jahn) has projects all over the world, but a tower project announced Thursday by Crain’s Chicago Business‘ Dennis Rodkin is on a site in the Chicago-based firm’s backyard.

Continue reading after the jump.

The Westin Hamburg to be housed within the Elbe Philharmonic Complex by Herzog & de Meuron

(Courtesy Herzog & De Meuron)

(Courtesy Herzog & De Meuron)

Starwood Hotels has announced that it will open The Westin Hamburg next year in the much-anticipated Elbe Philharmonic complex. The 10-story, 205-bedroom hotel by architects Herzog & de Meuron will be housed within a glass-fronted, wave-shaped building that sits atop a historic warehouse on the banks of the river Elbe. Boasting a pointed, wave-shaped roof, the complex will also feature three concert halls, 45 private apartments and a more than 43,000 square foot, publicly accessible plaza offering 360-degree city views.

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Pictorial> Twenty-one of the best pavilions from Milan Expo 2015

All the Pavilions. (Courtesy Expo Milano 2015)

All the Pavilions. (Courtesy Expo Milano 2015)

Milano Expo 2015 is rolling along, with 145 countries and a host of international organizations, civil society organizations, and corporations displaying their food-centric traditions and the latest sustainable agriculture and food production techniques.

Continue reading after the jump.

Alpine Factory by Barkow Leibinger

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Barkow Leibinger's HAWE-Werk Kaufbeuren was inspired by Le Corbusier's concept of the "green factory." (David Franck)

Barkow Leibinger’s HAWE-Werk Kaufbeuren was inspired by Le Corbusier’s concept of the “green factory.” (David Franck)

A geometric corrugated metal and glass facade integrates industry and nature.

Barkow Leibinger‘s original scheme for HAWE-Werk Kaufbeuren, developed for a competition several years ago, was “a completely crazy origami thing,” recalled partner Frank Barkow. But upon winning the commission and learning that the factory‘s owners wished to build it in a single phase, “we had to be careful not to kill them with the budget,” he said. “We really dumbed it down.”
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This year’s architecturally inspired films at the 2015 Slamdance and Sundance film festivals

Still from Concrete Love. (Courtesy respective directors)

Still from Concrete Love. (Maurizius Staerkle Drux)

This year’s Park City offerings at the Sundance and Slamdance film festivals ranged from portraits of architects, a mayor with architectural dreams, a victim of the foreclosure crisis, those trapped in physical and dreamed spaces, and individuals exploring the cultural landscape. Always a harbinger of what is coming up, look out for these films and media projects coming to a screen near you.

Continue reading after the jump.

Köhler Goes with the Flow in Hamburg

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Köhler Architekten designed and built a new row house in a protected area of Hamburg's Ottensen quarter. (Courtesy HI-MACS)

Köhler Architekten designed and built a new row house in a protected area of Hamburg’s Ottensen quarter. (Courtesy HI-MACS)

Composite facade brings new row house into harmony with its historic neighbors.

Florian Köhler, whose firm, Köhler Architekten, recently designed and built a new row house in Hamburg’s Ottensen quarter, observes a disheartening trend among his fellow architects. When designing for a site rich in historic context, they tend to shy away from all allusions to the past, opting instead for an antiseptic modernism. “Many architects only build cubic forms without reference to their environment, and cityscapes are becoming increasingly similar,” he said. “We deliberately wanted to go a different route.” Ice Loft, which is surrounded by protected properties dating to the mid-19th century, features a tripartite facade that translates familiar historic forms into smooth curves and planes. “Our unusual approach to the transformation of classical qualities into flowing forms seems to be a suitable alternative, at least at this point, in this urban district in Hamburg,” said Köhler.
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Tired of the noisy Autobahn, Hamburg to kick off major highway-capping project

The capped highway. (Courtesy hochtief solutions)

The capped highway. (Courtesy hochtief solutions)

The city of Hamburg is kicking off a massive effort to bury and cap two miles of a highway that cuts right through town. Fast Company reported that the $800 million project will create 60 new acres of green space which include “open meadows, woods, bike paths, community gardens, and tree-lined squares.” Capping the highway will also create space for about 2000 new homes, according to city officials.

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