The Westin Hamburg to be housed within the Elbe Philharmonic Complex by Herzog & de Meuron

(Courtesy Herzog & De Meuron)

(Courtesy Herzog & De Meuron)

Starwood Hotels has announced that it will open The Westin Hamburg next year in the much-anticipated Elbe Philharmonic complex. The 10-story, 205-bedroom hotel by architects Herzog & de Meuron will be housed within a glass-fronted, wave-shaped building that sits atop a historic warehouse on the banks of the river Elbe. Boasting a pointed, wave-shaped roof, the complex will also feature three concert halls, 45 private apartments and a more than 43,000 square foot, publicly accessible plaza offering 360-degree city views.

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Pictorial> Twenty-one of the best pavilions from Milan Expo 2015

All the Pavilions. (Courtesy Expo Milano 2015)

All the Pavilions. (Courtesy Expo Milano 2015)

Milano Expo 2015 is rolling along, with 145 countries and a host of international organizations, civil society organizations, and corporations displaying their food-centric traditions and the latest sustainable agriculture and food production techniques.

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Alpine Factory by Barkow Leibinger

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Barkow Leibinger's HAWE-Werk Kaufbeuren was inspired by Le Corbusier's concept of the "green factory." (David Franck)

Barkow Leibinger’s HAWE-Werk Kaufbeuren was inspired by Le Corbusier’s concept of the “green factory.” (David Franck)

A geometric corrugated metal and glass facade integrates industry and nature.

Barkow Leibinger‘s original scheme for HAWE-Werk Kaufbeuren, developed for a competition several years ago, was “a completely crazy origami thing,” recalled partner Frank Barkow. But upon winning the commission and learning that the factory‘s owners wished to build it in a single phase, “we had to be careful not to kill them with the budget,” he said. “We really dumbed it down.”
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This year’s architecturally inspired films at the 2015 Slamdance and Sundance film festivals

Still from Concrete Love. (Courtesy respective directors)

Still from Concrete Love. (Maurizius Staerkle Drux)

This year’s Park City offerings at the Sundance and Slamdance film festivals ranged from portraits of architects, a mayor with architectural dreams, a victim of the foreclosure crisis, those trapped in physical and dreamed spaces, and individuals exploring the cultural landscape. Always a harbinger of what is coming up, look out for these films and media projects coming to a screen near you.

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Köhler Goes with the Flow in Hamburg

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Köhler Architekten designed and built a new row house in a protected area of Hamburg's Ottensen quarter. (Courtesy HI-MACS)

Köhler Architekten designed and built a new row house in a protected area of Hamburg’s Ottensen quarter. (Courtesy HI-MACS)

Composite facade brings new row house into harmony with its historic neighbors.

Florian Köhler, whose firm, Köhler Architekten, recently designed and built a new row house in Hamburg’s Ottensen quarter, observes a disheartening trend among his fellow architects. When designing for a site rich in historic context, they tend to shy away from all allusions to the past, opting instead for an antiseptic modernism. “Many architects only build cubic forms without reference to their environment, and cityscapes are becoming increasingly similar,” he said. “We deliberately wanted to go a different route.” Ice Loft, which is surrounded by protected properties dating to the mid-19th century, features a tripartite facade that translates familiar historic forms into smooth curves and planes. “Our unusual approach to the transformation of classical qualities into flowing forms seems to be a suitable alternative, at least at this point, in this urban district in Hamburg,” said Köhler.
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Tired of the noisy Autobahn, Hamburg to kick off major highway-capping project

The capped highway. (Courtesy hochtief solutions)

The capped highway. (Courtesy hochtief solutions)

The city of Hamburg is kicking off a massive effort to bury and cap two miles of a highway that cuts right through town. Fast Company reported that the $800 million project will create 60 new acres of green space which include “open meadows, woods, bike paths, community gardens, and tree-lined squares.” Capping the highway will also create space for about 2000 new homes, according to city officials.

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David Chipperfield short-listed for Beethoven Concert Hall in Germany

Architecture, Awards, Design, International
Wednesday, November 19, 2014
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The hall at night. (Courtesy David Chipperfield Architects via  Beethoven Festspielhaus

The hall at night. (Courtesy David Chipperfield Architects via Beethoven Festspielhaus

Some of the biggest names in architecture have been whittled out of a competition to design a new Beethoven Concert Hall—or Beethoven Festspielhaus—in the composer’s hometown of Bonn, Germany. When the competition’s short list of ten proposals became an even-shorter list of three, the likes of Zaha Hadid, SnøhettaJAHN and UNStudio were sent packing. David Chipperfield, however, made it through and is joined in the final three by Valentiny hvp architects from Luxembourg and Kadawittfeldarchitektur from Germany. The new hall, which is slated to break ground in 2016, is expected to host celebrations for Beethoven’s 250th birthday in 2020, and the 200th anniversary of his death in 2027.

View the proposals after the jump.

Aluminum Organic by J. MAYER H. Architects

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J. MAYER H. Architects designed a sculptural facade of anodized aluminum for an apartment building in Berlin. (Ludger Paffrath for Euroboden)

J. MAYER H. Architects designed a sculptural facade of anodized aluminum for an apartment building in Berlin. (Ludger Paffrath for Euroboden)

Ribbons of laser-cut metal lamellas envelop a glass curtain wall.

J. MAYER H. Architects designed the sculptural anodized aluminum facade of JOH3, a Berlin apartment building located near both the Friedrichstrasße and Museum Island, as a contemporary echo of its historic neighbors. “The project is located in an old part of Berlin, where there are lots of facades with stucco detail,” said project architect Hans Schneider. “We tried to do something as rich with a new design, something like Jugendstil [the German Art Deco movement] but in a modern translation.”
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REX’s Joshua Prince-Ramus Unwraps His Approach to Facade Design

REX's Media Headquarters Buildings feature retractable sunshades based on a traditional Arab Mashrabiya pattern. (Courtesy REX)

REX’s Media Headquarters Buildings feature retractable sunshades based on a traditional Arab Mashrabiya pattern. (Courtesy REX)

Joshua Prince-Ramus, principal at REX, has a bone to pick with modernism and its legacy. “For the last 100 years, architecture’s been involved in a silly tension between form and function,” he said. While high modernism privileged function over form, some of today’s top designers argue that architecture is about aesthetics and not much else. REX has a different take: architecture, the firm claims, is both function and form. “We really believe that architecture can do things. It’s not just a representational art form,” said Prince-Ramus. “We talk about performance. Aesthetics are part of performance [as is function.]”

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The Twisting Tour Total

Fabrikator
Friday, October 18, 2013
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Aesthetic dynamics for the 18-story tower were designed in Rhino. (Ina Reinecke)

Aesthetic dynamics for the 18-story tower were designed in Rhino. (Ina Reinecke)

Barkow Leibinger designs a precast folded facade that puts a gentle spin on surrounding traditional architecture.

On one of the last urban tracts of available land in Berlin, Germany, local architecture firm Barkow Leibinger recently completed an 18-story tower, Tour Total. Highly visible from a neighboring train station, and the first completed project in the site’s 40-acre master plan, the tower has a raster facade with precast concrete panels that were geometrically computed in Rhino to create twisting inflections, conveying a sense of movement around the building’s four sides.

As a load-bearing facade, 40 percent of the surface is closed, and 60 percent is triple-glazed, with every other window operable. In addition to integrated energy management strategies—the first building tenant is French energy company Total—partner Frank Barkow said the firm’s extensive background in digital fabrication and research allowed the efficient development of the dynamic facade. Drawing from the surrounding, traditionally quadrilinear brick facades of the 1920s and 30s, the tower’s lines are imbued with an engrained depth that twists optically to read differently in direct sun or cloudy weather, without actually moving. Read More

BaseCamp Bonn Young Hostel: A Quirky Vintage Indoor Camper Park

International
Friday, October 11, 2013
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BASECAMP BONN YOUNG HOSTEL. (COURTESEY BONN YOUNG HOSTEL)

Germans have taken on a unique approach to hospitality. This past August, hotelier Michael Schloesser introduced an innovative type of lodging two miles from the city center of Bonn. By converting an old storage facility into an indoor campground, Schloesser has created what he calls the world’s first camping trailer hotel: BaseCamp Bonn Young Hostel. Inside the warehouse, numerous trailers, vintage vans, sleeping cars and motorhomes are arranged to create a typical campground setup.

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Spend the Night in the Dessau Bauhaus

International
Thursday, October 3, 2013
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Bauhaus Studio Building Converted into Boutique Hotel Dorms (Courtesy Paula Soler-Moya / Flickr)

Bauhaus Studio Building Becomes Boutique Hotel Dorms (Courtesy Paula Soler-Moya / Flickr)

Miss out on your Bauhaus opportunity because you were not an artistic youth in 1920s and 1930s Germany? Now, architecture and design enthusiasts can revive their desired pasts as students at Walter Gropius’ iconic design school, at least in sleeping accommodations. The Bauhaus School of Design in Dessau, Germany has converted one of its studio buildings into a boutique hotel with dormitory-style rooms for overnight rental. Visitors can spend the night in spaces that once housed some of the biggest names in modern architecture, when they were still just students.

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