Here are three bold designs from winning teams that completely reimagine the Los Angeles Convention Center

Architecture, News, West
Friday, May 22, 2015
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HMC Architects and Populous.

HMC Architects and Populous.

The Los Angeles Convention Center is desperately in need of an overhaul. Architect Charles Luckman designed the original boxy structure in 1971 and James Ingo Freed added the glassy Annex in 1997. Today, both buildings lack the square footage and amenities to add up to a competitive venue. Centers in Las Vegas or Chicago eclipse LA’s meager 870,000 square feet by double or triple square footage. Indeed, in the decades since the venue was constructed the whole approach to convention center design has changed.

Continue reading after the jump.

Gensler’s Kristopher Stuart on Houston’s Facades Scene

Facades+AM makes its Houston debut June 18. (Katie Haugland / Flickr)

Facades+AM makes its Houston debut June 18. (Katie Haugland / Flickr)

For Kristopher Stuart, design director and principal at Gensler, Houston‘s rapid evolution is exactly what makes practicing architecture there exciting. Read More

Chinese developers see gold in Downtown Los Angeles

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(courtesy Gensler/ Shenzhen-Hazens)

It’s a good time to be a Chinese developer in Downtown Los Angeles. Beijing-based Oceanwide and Shanghai-based Greenland are already building two of the largest projects in the city: Fig Central and Metropolis. Now according to LA Downtown News, Shenzhen-based Shenzhen-Hazens has announced plans to build a $700 million, Gensler-designed project on Figueroa street across from LA Live.

Continue reading after the jump.

Gensler and HWKN team up to bring a ziggurat-shaped office building to Williamsburg, Brooklyn

The Williamsburg Generator by Gensler and HWKN. (Courtesy lifang)

The Williamsburg Generator by Gensler and HWKN. (Courtesy lifang)

If approved, this terraced building will rise in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, bringing the neighborhood new office space for tech and creative companies—and momentarily interrupting its unceasing march of bland and boxy new apartments. The “Williamsburg Generator,” as it has been dubbed, would be the neighborhood’s first ground-up speculative office building in four decades—but it is not a done deal just yet because the Gensler and HWKN–designed building sits within an area zoned for manufacturing.

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Eavesdrop> It’s Very European! Houston developers invoke the Old World to help sell real estate

Before and after of the Alessandra Hotel design. (Courtesy Gensler)

Before and after of the Alessandra Hotel design. (Courtesy Gensler)

Eavesdrop is scratching its head. First, in January, Gensler released new renderings for the Hotel Alessandra in downtown Houston. Where before the firm had proposed a sleek modern glass tower for the site with strong, swooping vertical lines that accentuated the building’s height, the new iteration shows a collection of rectilinear facade treatments of varying levels of transparency arranged to express a podium, tower, and crown with cornice. Jonathan Brinsden, CEO of the project’s developer, Midway, described the new look as a “modern interpretation of European style.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Gensler is adding a smaller sibling to the JW Marriott at L.A. Live

Architecture, Urbanism, West
Thursday, March 19, 2015
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The new hotel (left) will be shorter, more angular, and less bulbous than its relative. (LA Live)

Gensler’s Los Angeles football stadium may be in trouble (still, not dead), but the firm is busy as ever. Their latest news is the expansion of the JW Marriott and Ritz-Carlton in Downtown Los Angeles, creating the second largest hotel in California.

Continue reading after the jump.

With some help from Gensler, ASLA to turn its headquarters into the Center for Landscape Architecture

The new facade. (Courtesy Gensler via ASLA)

The new facade. (Courtesy Gensler via ASLA)

The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) has tapped Gensler and landscape architecture firm Oehme van Sweden to turn its Washington, D.C. headquarters into the state-of-the-art Center for Landscape Architecture. ASLA bought its 12,000-square-foot home in 1997 for $2.4 million and watched as its value increased to $6.9 million. Since the building was about ready for some fixing up, the society decided it was a good time to go ahead and truly transform it at a cost of $4 million.

Continue reading after the jump.

St. Louis Rams owner proposes NFL stadium for Los Angeles

Architecture, Urbanism, West
Friday, January 9, 2015
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Inglewood's "City of Champions" Revitalization Project (HKS)

Inglewood’s “City of Champions” Revitalization Project (HKS)

After years of, ahem, false starts, it’s looking very possible that the NFL will be returning to Los Angeles. According to the LA Times, St. Louis Rams owner Stan Kroenke, who bought 60 acres next to the Forum in Inglewood last year, has announced plans to build an HKS-designed 80,000-seat stadium and a 6,000-seat performance venue as part of the 300-acre Hollywood Park site.

Continue reading after the jump.

Displaced by subway construction, Los Angeles’ A+D Museum finds a new Arts District home

Architecture, West
Tuesday, January 6, 2015
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Interior of A+D space, prior to buildout (John Dale)

Interior of future A+D space, prior to buildout (John Dale)

Los Angeles’ often-mobile A+D Architecture and Design Museum, which has been displaced from its perch on Museum Row by Metro’s Purple Line Extension, has found a new home in city’s Arts District. Read More

Winner chosen for another billion dollar addition to LAX

Transportation, West
Tuesday, December 23, 2014
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LAX People Mover plan (LAWA)

LAX People Mover plan (LAWA)

Last year LAX opened its soaring new Tom Bradley International Terminal addition. But that was just the beginning of changes at Los Angeles’ woefully-out-of-date airport. The biggest news: Last week the LA Board of Airport Commissioners awarded Turner|PCL (a joint Venture with Corgan/Gensler) a contract to design and build a $1.25 billion Midfield Satellite Concourse (MSC) North Project.

Continue reading after the jump.

Arktura Forms Gensler’s Frameworks

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Fabrikator
The serpentine steel screen is composed of hundreds of uniquely shaped cells. (Courtesy Arktura)

The serpentine steel screen is composed of hundreds of uniquely shaped cells. (Courtesy Arktura)

Framework is made of 260 unique steel boxes, laser-cut and sculpted on an 18-axis metal forming machine.

When designers at Gensler’s Dallas office dreamt up plans for a serpentine steel screen composed of hundreds of perforated cells, they enlisted the design-build talents of Arktura, based in Gardena, California, 14 miles south of downtown Los Angeles. Though still mostly architects, Arktura’s staff includes mechanical engineers and even a physicist. The company’s 50,000-square-foot space includes a design studio, an engineering studio, and manufacturing space where they produce furniture, architectural products, and custom projects—like the one Gensler took to calling “Frameworks: Cellure Structure.”

“It’s in our DNA to allow a lot of flexibility when we’re working with design teams,” said Sebastian Muñoz, director of project design and development. Gensler’s concept remained intact through numerous redesigns, Muñoz said, but getting it right required a lot of flexibility.

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