See the Grand Palais submerged in a virtual waterfall in 3D projection mapping design by Japanese art collective teamLab

(Courtesy teamLab)

(Courtesy teamLab)

Recently, Paris’ Grand Palais was awash in the cascade of a virtual waterfall, transforming the beaux-arts palace into a captivating scene from the lost city of Atlantis. TeamLab, a Japanese collective of technologists and artists, used 3D projection mapping to create the holographic play of light and shadow, while maintaining a fidelity to the laws of physics.

Continue reading after the jump.

French law mandates green roofs or solar panels on all new buildings in commercial zones

Montmartre Funicular Railway (Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

Montmartre Funicular Railway (Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

It’s serious crunch time in France for environmental policymaking as regulations tighten in deference to the 2020 goal of reducing carbon emissions by 25 percent. Paris is also scrambling for brownie points as it prepares to host the UN Conference on Climate Change this November.

Lawmakers in France recently decreed that all rooftops of new commercial buildings must be covered in either plants or solar panels. Other major cities have gone to similarly stringent lengths, with the city of Toronto, Canada, mandating green roofs on all new buildings in 2009—whether residential, industrial or commercial.

Continue reading after the jump.

French artist Julien Salaud creates enchanting constellations from thread coated in UV paint

Art, International
Wednesday, June 17, 2015
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(Courtesy MyModernMet)

(Courtesy MyModernMet)

Awe-inspiring and mystic, French artist Julien Salaud’s constellation-like thread art evokes teeming scenes of nature, mythologies, and prehistoric cave paintings. And lasers.

More after the jump.

Pictorial> Twenty-one of the best pavilions from Milan Expo 2015

All the Pavilions. (Courtesy Expo Milano 2015)

All the Pavilions. (Courtesy Expo Milano 2015)

Milano Expo 2015 is rolling along, with 145 countries and a host of international organizations, civil society organizations, and corporations displaying their food-centric traditions and the latest sustainable agriculture and food production techniques.

Continue reading after the jump.

An architect from Vancouver wants to build the world’s tallest wooden skyscraper over a roadway in Paris

Baobab in Paris. (Courtesy Michael Green Architecture)

Baobab in Paris. (Courtesy Michael Green Architecture)

Back in March, AN wrote about Rüdiger Lainer and Partners’ plan to construct a wood skyscraper in Vienna. The so-called HoHo project would rise 276 feet and be about three-quarters wood. Now, Vancouver-based architect Michael Green, whose eponymous firm is behind “the tallest mass timber building in the United States” has proposed a timber tower for Paris that would be 10 stories taller—making it the tallest such structure on earth. That is, if it gets built.

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Wispy-looking design for Herzog & de Meuron’s new Bordeaux stadium features 900 slim columns

(Courtesy Nouveau Stade Bordeaux)

(Courtesy Nouveau Stade Bordeaux)

A new Bordeaux stadium by architects Herzog & de Meuron debunks the hulking typology of a sporting facility. The architect compares the “elegant” and “lightweight”-looking design to a “classic temple,” which doesn’t seem all that hyperbolic.

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Electricity-generating Wind Trees will power Paris’ Place de la Concorde

Other
Monday, February 2, 2015
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Rendering of the wind tree, which is designed to integrate with an urban environment. (Courtesy New Wind)

Rendering of the wind tree, which is designed to integrate with an urban environment. (Courtesy New Wind)

The power grid of the future may consist entirely of trees—and we don’t mean biofuel. French R&D company New Wind recently pioneered the “wind tree,” a wind turbine that is both silent and soothing to behold.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> The Louvre opens major restoration of its Decorative Arts Galleries

Preliminary sketch for the Bas de Montargis and Oudry galleries by Jacques Garcia.

Preliminary sketch for the Bas de Montargis and Oudry galleries by Jacques Garcia.

If you like French decorative arts you should make your way this summer to the Louvre’s newly restored and reinstalled 18th century Decorative Arts Galleries. The collection is housed in 35 galleries spanning 23,000 square feet. Over 2,000 design pieces “in object-focused galleries and period-room settings” are on display.

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French Artist Turns Iconic Architecture into Quirky Animated GIF’s

Memory Museum by Estudio America. (Courtesy Axel de Stampa)

Mirador Building by MVRDV. (Courtesy Axel de Stampa)

The French “GIF artist”—welcome to the 21st century, everybody—Axel de Stampa has officially made time-lapse videos look like child’s play. In his new project, Animated Architecture, de Stampa spins, shifts, tops, and deconstructs some of the most visually distinctive contemporary buildings—all in endlessly entertaining GIF format.

Check out more after the jump.

Sands of Time: How an Architect Commemorates D-Day’s 70-Year Anniversary

(Courtesy donaldweber.com)

(Courtesy Circuit Gallery)

Donald Weber is a former architect turned visual media artist. His latest project, War Sand, is a series of microscopic photographs that depict pieces of shrapnel embedded in individual grains of sand along the beaches of Normandy. Each photograph—which takes over eight hours for Weber to produce—is a testimony to one of the most famous days in history, as well as to the relationship between art and science.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Eiffel Tower’s New “First Floor” Almost Complete

Architecture, International
Thursday, March 13, 2014
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Work is almost finished on a revamped viewing platform and event space at the Eiffel Tower. While it’s called the First Floor, it’s nearly 200 feet above ground and will offer panoramic views of Paris. And for the braver visitors, it will offer views straight down as the new space has a glass-floor viewing platform. Moatti-Rivière Architects is heading up the renovation, which will include shops, restaurants, conference rooms and event spaces. The new floor will also be better suited to those with disabilities and incorporate green technologies including solar panels and the rainwater collection.

Market-in-Training: Proposal Would Transform Paris’ Abandoned Railroad

City Terrain, International
Tuesday, February 11, 2014
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Parisian market archpaper 1

(Courtesy Amílcar Ferreira & Marcelo Fernandes)

Paris is known in part for its numerous quaint outdoor markets offering foodstuffs and vintage objects. It is also home to an—if not quaint, at least fairly aged—abandoned railway system, the Chemin de fer de Petite Ceinture. Two enterprising architects have now proposed combining the idea behind the former retail markets and the infrastructure of the latter to create a traveling market that would circle the city center.

Read more after the jump.

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