High-Design Parking Garage by IwamotoScott

Brought to you with support from:
facadeplus_logo1
IwamotoScott crafted a digitally-fabricated aluminum skin for a Miami Design District parking garage. (Courtesy IwamotoScott)

IwamotoScott crafted a digitally-fabricated aluminum skin for a Miami Design District parking garage. (Courtesy IwamotoScott)

Digitally-fabricated folded aluminum screen animates a utilitarian structure.

In the Miami Design District, even the parking garages are works of art. The recently completed City View Garage is no exception, thanks in part to a folded aluminum facade designed by IwamotoScott.
Read More

SHoP Architects’ twisting skyscraper in Miami includes two acres of glowing digital billboards

SHOP'S MIAMI INNOVATION DISTRICT. (COURTESY SHOP VIA MIAMI HERALD)

SHOP’S MIAMI INNOVATION DISTRICT. (COURTESY SHOP VIA MIAMI HERALD)

Even in a city like Miami, this twisting, LED-emblazoned tower seems a bit over the top. The curious 633-foot structure, called the Miami Innovation Tower, is the work of SHoP Architects, a firm known for adventurous designs, from the Barclays Center in Brooklyn to skinny supertall skyscrapers in Manhattan. But even with that reputation, this one takes us by surprise.

Continue reading after the jump.

Pedestrian-friendly makeover proposed for Downtown Miami

(Courtesy Behar Font & Partners via Miami Downtown Development Authority)

(Courtesy Behar Font & Partners via Miami Downtown Development Authority)

New towers seem to be cropping up in Downtown Miami every 15 minutes. But with the growing housing supply of apartments, and the impressive Perez Art Museum by Herzog & de Mueron, the area continues to be seriously lacking when it comes to walkability and open space. Now, that could change if a proposal by the Miami Downtown Development Authority (DDA) gets the green light.

Read More

The public asked to help save this Paul Rudolph shelter in Sarasota, Florida

Architecture, East, Preservation
Thursday, March 26, 2015
.
(Courtesy Sarasota Architectural Foundation)

(Courtesy Sarasota Architectural Foundation)

 

Why is Paul Rudolph—like much of Brutalism—so unloved by officialdom? His Orange County Government in Goshen, New York has been under threat of demolition by local government for several years. Now an elegant canopy the architect designed and built in 196o for Sarasota High School in Florida may also end up in a local landfill.

Read More

Eavesdrop> What Climate Change? Florida government allegedly bans the words “climate change” and “sustainability”

Florida Governor Rick Scott. (Nathan Edwards)

Florida Governor Rick Scott. (Nathan Edwards)

 

Florida officials have reportedly banned the state’s Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) from using “climate change,” “global warming,” and “sustainability” in all official correspondence.

Read More

High Line designer James Corner tapped to design Miami’s “Underline” linear park

Beneath the Metrorail in Miami. (Flickr / Melissa Venable)

Beneath the Metrorail in Miami. (Flickr / Melissa Venable)

Just about every city on planet earth wants to build its own version of New York City‘s hugely popular High Line. The ever-growing list includes Miami that plans to turn a 10-mile stretch of underutilized land beneath its elevated Metrorail into a park and bike path. The project is called “The Underline” because, well, you get it.

Continue reading after the jump.

This mall looks like it should be built in Dubai, but it’s actually planned in Miami as the nation’s largest

Americana Dream Miami. (Courtesy The Triple 5 Group via the Miami Herald)

Americana Dream Miami. (Courtesy The Triple 5 Group via the Miami Herald)

The slew of stories on the death of the American shopping mall has not deterred one real estate company from submitting plans to build the largest shopping and entertainment center in the country. The Miami Herald reported that the ambitious plan comes from the Triple 5 Group, a company that knows a thing or two about big malls—it owns and runs the Mall of America in Minnesota. Apparently not satisfied with letting that mall remain the nation’s largest, the developer has unveiled designs for something even larger in Miami-Dade County.

Read More

This Florida mansion by Chad Oppenheim is more like a sumptuous resort in disguise

Driveway, home, and guest house. The backyard. (Courtesy Oppenheim Architecture + Design)

Driveway, home, and guest house. The backyard. (Courtesy Oppenheim Architecture + Design)

AN has an exclusive look at a new home in Golden Beach, Florida designed by Chad Oppenheim of Oppenheim Architecture + Design. If we’re being honest here, the 23,000-square-foot home is really more of a resort masquerading as a private residence. Or maybe it’s a private residence masquerading as a resort. Either way, the home is massive and packed with amenities.

Continue reading after the jump.

Goetz Brings Bucky Back

Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Goetz Composites designed and fabricated a reproduction of R. Buckminster Fuller's Fly's Eye Dome in cooperation with the Buckminster Fuller Institute. (Lala Periera)

Goetz Composites designed and fabricated a reproduction of R. Buckminster Fuller’s Fly’s Eye Dome in cooperation with the Buckminster Fuller Institute. (Lala Periera)

Fly’s Eye Dome reproduction applies contemporary tools and materials to 1970s concept.

Thirty years after R. Buckminster Fuller‘s death, the visionary inventor and architect’s Fly’s Eye Dome has been reborn in Miami. Unveiled during Art Basel Miami Beach 2014, the replica dome, designed and fabricated by Goetz Composites in cooperation with the Buckminster Fuller Institute (BFI), pays tribute to Fuller both aesthetically and technologically. Constructed using contemporary materials and digital design tools, the new 24-foot Fly’s Eye Dome (which serves as the pedestrian entrance to a parking garage in the Miami Design District) is yet further evidence that the creator of the geodesic dome was ahead of his time.

Read More

St. Petersburg, Florida flooded with proposals to transform its famous 1970s-era pier

Destination St. Pete Pier plan. (Courtesy St. Pete Design Group)

Destination St. Pete Pier plan. (Courtesy St. Pete Design Group)

About 10 years ago, the city of St. Petersburg, Florida started talking about tearing down one of its most well-known piece of architecture: a 1970s-era, inverted pyramid at the end of a city pier. The city would then replace that pier head with a more modern, but still architecturally significant, statement. So, a few years back, a design competition was launched, and it resulted in some of the most ambitious designs we’ve ever seen from a competition like this.

View the proposals after the jump.

New Buildings Institute catalogues the nation’s net-zero buildings

The David and Lucile Packard Foundation's headquarters in Los Altos, California is a relatively rare example of certified net-zero built work in the U.S. Completed in 2012, the building features a sophisticated cooling system, natural ventilation, and is certified LEED Platinum. (Jeremy Bittermann via Esherick Homsey Dodge & Davis)

The David and Lucile Packard Foundation’s headquarters in Los Altos, California is a relatively rare example of certified net-zero built work in the U.S. Completed in 2012, the building features a sophisticated cooling system, natural ventilation, and is certified LEED Platinum. (Jeremy Bittermann via Esherick Homsey Dodge & Davis)

The Vancouver-based New Buildings Institute (NBI) tracks energy efficient built work, and their 2014 update, “Getting to Zero”, provides a snapshot of the emerging U.S. market for net-zero buildings—those are structures that use no more energy than they can gather on site.

Read More

Sarasota architects hope to preserve Mid-Century Modernism in Florida

Architecture, East, Newsletter
Monday, December 8, 2014
.
Healy Guest House by Ralph Twitchell and Paul Rudolph.

Healy Guest House by Ralph Twitchell and Paul Rudolph.

The style of architecture known as “mid-century modern” is a cousin to the “International style.” A popular combination of European stylistic tendencies and domestic American influences, including furniture design, it has become an influential catch all term for distinguished post-World War II structures and commercial tract homes (like the Eichler Homes). While the style has become widely popular in lifestyle magazines like Dwell and even replicated in new suburban developments, the original homes are being regularly torn down and being replaced with bloated McMansions that have shoe closets the size of the former mid-century living rooms.

Read More

Page 1 of 3123

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2015 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License