St. Petersburg, Florida flooded with proposals to transform its famous 1970s-era pier

Destination St. Pete Pier plan. (Courtesy St. Pete Design Group)

Destination St. Pete Pier plan. (Courtesy St. Pete Design Group)

About 10 years ago, the city of St. Petersburg, Florida started talking about tearing down one of its most well-known piece of architecture: a 1970s-era, inverted pyramid at the end of a city pier. The city would then replace that pier head with a more modern, but still architecturally significant, statement. So, a few years back, a design competition was launched, and it resulted in some of the most ambitious designs we’ve ever seen from a competition like this.

View the proposals after the jump.

New Buildings Institute catalogues the nation’s net-zero buildings

The David and Lucile Packard Foundation's headquarters in Los Altos, California is a relatively rare example of certified net-zero built work in the U.S. Completed in 2012, the building features a sophisticated cooling system, natural ventilation, and is certified LEED Platinum. (Jeremy Bittermann via Esherick Homsey Dodge & Davis)

The David and Lucile Packard Foundation’s headquarters in Los Altos, California is a relatively rare example of certified net-zero built work in the U.S. Completed in 2012, the building features a sophisticated cooling system, natural ventilation, and is certified LEED Platinum. (Jeremy Bittermann via Esherick Homsey Dodge & Davis)

The Vancouver-based New Buildings Institute (NBI) tracks energy efficient built work, and their 2014 update, “Getting to Zero”, provides a snapshot of the emerging U.S. market for net-zero buildings—those are structures that use no more energy than they can gather on site.

Read More

Sarasota architects hope to preserve Mid-Century Modernism in Florida

Architecture, East, Newsletter
Monday, December 8, 2014
.
Healy Guest House by Ralph Twitchell and Paul Rudolph.

Healy Guest House by Ralph Twitchell and Paul Rudolph.

The style of architecture known as “mid-century modern” is a cousin to the “International style.” A popular combination of European stylistic tendencies and domestic American influences, including furniture design, it has become an influential catch all term for distinguished post-World War II structures and commercial tract homes (like the Eichler Homes). While the style has become widely popular in lifestyle magazines like Dwell and even replicated in new suburban developments, the original homes are being regularly torn down and being replaced with bloated McMansions that have shoe closets the size of the former mid-century living rooms.

Read More

Unveiled> 41-story office and hotel tower in Chicago’s West Loop

590 W. Madison, an office and hotel tower planned for Chicago's West Loop. (Goettsch Partners)

590 W. Madison, an office and hotel tower planned for Chicago’s West Loop. (Goettsch Partners)

This week an already roiling real estate market in Chicago’s West Loop got hotter still. The latest entrant is a $400 million mixed-use tower designed by Goettsch Partners—a 350-room, four-star hotel beneath about 600,000 square feet of offices that will surely stoke the continued evolution of the area from post-industrial grittiness into a sleek, high-rent hub for technology companies and haute cuisine.

Continue reading after the jump.

Unveiled> Fernando Romero plays the stacking game with the Latin American Art Museum in Miami

Architecture, Art, East, News, Unveiled
Thursday, December 4, 2014
.
The Latin American Art Museum. (Courtesy FR-EE)

The Latin American Art Museum. (Courtesy FR-EE)

With Art Basel underway, not-quite-yet-starchitect Fernando Romero has unveiled new plans for what could become Miami‘s next architectural icon: the Latin American Art Museum (LAAM). That’s right, this 90,000 square foot, cantilevering structure could overshadow the nearby works of his higher-profile peers like Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid, and Lord Norman Foster. And Jeanne Gang and Herzog & de Meuron. And also Bjarke Ingels and Enrique Norten, because Romero’s—sorry, and Richard Meier and Rem Koolhaas. Okay, that has to be everyone. All starchitects have been accounted for. Where were we? Right, the Latin American Art Museum.

Continue reading after the jump.

Design Miami/ unveils its pavilion for this year’s show

Architecture, Art, Design, East
Monday, November 10, 2014
.
(Courtesy Gesi Schilling via Design Miami/)

(Courtesy Gesi Schilling via Design Miami/)

Design Miami/, the annual global design forum, has announced that Minneapolis-based designer Jonathan Muecke has been selected to design its pavilion for next month’s show. For the coveted commission, Muecke created a cylindrical space accessible through two entrance points. The structure is finished in primary colors: red and green on the inside and blue and yellow on the outside. Within the circle is “seamlessly shaped seating” designed to “allow visitors a moment of quiet reflection.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Iconic works by Paul Rudolph to be celebrated in Sarasota, Florida

Architecture, East, On View, Preservation
Thursday, September 25, 2014
.
Umbrella House after restoration. (Bill Miller)

Umbrella House after restoration. (Bill Miller)

In 1948, Paul Rudolph was residing at the American Academy in Rome. He had traveled there to study classical architecture, but was instead spending his days designing modern houses for Sarasota, Florida. In fact, Sarasota, according to Timothy Rohan who has recently published a monograph on Rudolph, made a huge impression on the architect and defined his work for the rest of his career. He had moved there to apprentice and work for the local architect Ralph Twitchell, who in the 1940s helped create a style of modern house that eventually became known as the Sarasota school.

Read More

Official Renderings Unveiled for Koolhaas’ Miami Condos Towers

The towers. (Courtesy OMA)

The towers. (Courtesy OMA)

And you can now add Rem Koolhaas to the ever-growing list of starchitects designing luxury condos in Miami. Curbed Miami recently attended the unveiling of the Dutchman’s luxury project at Coconut Grove, which is rising conspicuously close to a project by his former student, Bjarke Ingels. Conspicuously close. But since this is Miami, Koolhaas was not the only starchitect vying for the project, known as Park Grove. He had to beat proposals from Christian de Portzamparc, Jean Nouvel, and Diller Scofidio + Renfro.

Continue reading after the jump.

And Another: SOM Unveils Third Trussed Station Design for Florida’s Commuter Rail

All Aboard Florida's West Palm Beach station. (Courtesy SOM)

All Aboard Florida’s West Palm Beach station. (Courtesy SOM)

With another set of renderings revealed for Florida‘s upcoming commuter rail service, it’s clear that SOM hopes to give the system a highly recognizable visual brand. After the firm unveiled plans for All Aboard Florida’s Miami Station, which floats the rails 50-feet above grade on trusses, SOM and Zyscovich Architects revealed its design for the smaller Ft. Lauderdale station, which clearly borrowed heavily from the first. The 27,500-square-foot hub is also defined by reinforced concrete trusses. And today, with images released for the West Palm Beach station, we know those trusses aren’t going anywhere.

Continue reading after the jump.

SOM Unveils Second Station for Florida’s Commuter Rail System

All Aboard Florida's Ft. Lauderdale station. (Courtesy SOM)

All Aboard Florida’s Ft. Lauderdale station. (Courtesy SOM)

In May, SOM released renderings for Miami Station—a 1,000-foot-long, multimodal transit hub that would anchor the Sunshine State’s impending high-speed commuter rail system known as All Aboard Florida. The firm floated the station 50 feet atop reinforced concrete trusses to allow for restaurants and retail, and an uninterrupted street grid. Now, with the Miami station getting underway, SOM has unveiled plans for the system’s Ft. Lauderdale station, and it appears that a design trend is emerging down in Florida.

Read More

Zaha Hadid Uses Hologram to Reveal Futuristic Design of Miami’s One Thousand Museum Tower

East
Wednesday, November 27, 2013
.
(Courtesy 1000 Museum)

(Courtesy 1000 Museum)

In the same futuristic spirit of its design, One Thousand Museum, the proposed Zaha Hadid-designed condominium building in Miami, Florida, has recently been rendered in hologram form. As anticipation builds about what will be the Pritzker Prize–winning architect’s first residential building in the United States, Zaha Hadid Architects continued the hype with a Miami party and holographic unveiling of the 705-foot condo tower. According to the South Florida Business Journal, the new digital rendering underscores Hadid’s commitment to curvilinear forms, especially prevalent in this sculptural tower that will soon join the Magic City skyline.

Continue Reading After the Jump.

Unbuilt Frank Lloyd Wright House Constructed at Florida Southern College

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, November 6, 2013
.
(Courtesy Florida Southern / Flickr)

(Courtesy Florida Southern / Flickr)

A never-before-built Frank Lloyd Wright house has been painstakingly constructed on its original site at Florida Southern College. The 1700-square-foot Usonian house, designed by Wright in 1939 as modest faculty housing, is the 13th structure by the renowned architect to be built on Florida Southern’s campus, but the first since Wright’s death in 1959.

Continue reading after the jump.

Page 1 of 212

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License