It’s a Wrap: Highlights from AN’s first Los Angeles Facades+ Conference

West
Friday, February 13, 2015
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The symposium at Facades+ covers the latest topics in the field.

The symposium at Facades+ covers the latest topics in the field.

 

The first-ever Los Angeles Facades + conference, organized by The Architect’s Newspaper and Enclos, held in the shadow of Bunker Hill’s glassy towers, showcased the city’s technical and creative talent while introducing participants to the building envelope field’s latest technologies and trends.

Keynote speaker James Carpenter set a sophisticated tone, showing off richly complex work that explores both the “cinematic” and “volumetric qualities of light.” His World Trade Center 7 base, he pointed out, uses a subtle shift in plane to create an ethereal glow, while another project for Gucci in Tokyo uses prismatic light to recreate the qualities of a Japanese lantern. Other highlights included his louvered Israel Museum and his new exploration of optical aluminum, thin glasses, and computer etched glass.

Continue reading after the jump.

Glass Magazine Calls Facades+ LA Conference “invigorating” and “exciting”

Architecture, National
Tuesday, February 10, 2015
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(courtesy wikipedia commons)

(courtesy wikipedia commons)

Thanks to our friends at Glass magazine for attending the recent Facades+ LA conference. They’ve provided an excellent wrap-up of the event, which they called “invigorating and exciting.” Editor Katy Devlin identified ten key themes from the conference: net zero building, net zero ready, material transparency, durability and sustainability, preservation, value, updatability, dynamic and integrated facades, human health, and water conservation. This variety and depth of subjects are precisely what makes the Facades+ conferences so important to the A/E/C industry. Next up, Facades+ AM in Washington, on March 5. Join the conversation!

Nashville breaks ground on Bridgestone’s 30-story tower in downtown SoBro district

Bridgestone Americas' new headquarters in downtown Nashville is expected to open in 2017. (Perkins + Will)

Bridgestone Americas’ new headquarters in downtown Nashville is expected to open in 2017. (Perkins + Will)

Nashville, long known more as a mecca for Country Music than a development hotspot, is enjoying a downtown resurgence. Projects like Music City Center and the redevelopment of the Tennessee capital’s convention center are forging a new urban character for Nashville.

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Learn and Earn CES LU Credits at Facades+ Los Angeles

Architecture, Technology, West
Thursday, January 15, 2015
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Facades+ tech workshops offer hands-on exposure to digital design methods.

Facades+ tech workshops offer hands-on exposure to digital design methods.

In the fast-paced world of building design, hands-on instruction in new methods can be hard to come by. Next month, attendees at Facades+ LA can take advantage of a unique opportunity for one-on-one guidance in digital tools at tech workshops intimately connected to the themes of the conference. “The tech workshops are a great way to learn cutting edge methods that are regularly at the core of what is presented in the symposium and dialog sessions,” remarked Thornton Tomasetti‘s Matt Naugle, a veteran Facades+ tech workshop instructor.

More info after the jump.

Pictorial> OneEleven, Chicago’s ritzy Loop residential with a rocky history

OneEleven, at 111 W. Wacker Dr. in Chicago. (Kevin Zolkiewicz via Flickr)

OneEleven, at 111 W. Wacker Dr. in Chicago. (Kevin Zolkiewicz via Flickr)

Developers Related completed its resurrection of 111 West Wacker Drive earlier this year, opening a luxury rental tower on the Chicago River where for years stood a ghostly concrete frame left over from a previous owner’s attempt to build. Read More

Talking tall buildings in Shanghai

In September the Chicago-based Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) gathered high-minded designers, developers and engineers for a conference in Shanghai. CTBUH, which often partners with AN on conferences, including our own Facades+ events, invited me to serve as a special media correspondent for the conference, held September 16–19. I spent most of the time conducting video interviews with the symposium guests, which we’ll post here on the AN blog as they become available. For now, here’ a quick overview of the topics discussed.

Continue reading after the jump.

Such Great Heights: CTBUH names world’s best tall buildings

One Central Park (Richard Braddish)

One Central Park (Richard Braddish)

The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, the nonprofit arbiter on tall building design, has named its 2014 picks for best tall buildings. Among the winners are a twisting tower in Dubai, Portland’s greenest retrofit, and a veritable jungle of a high-rise.

Read More

Letter to the Editor> Improvising Modernism

300, 320, and 350 Park Avenue. (Courtesy WASA / STUDIO A)

300, 320, and 350 Park Avenue. (Courtesy WASA / STUDIO A)

[Editor’s Note: The following are reader-submitted response to a back-page comment written by Pamela Jerome (“The Mid-Century Modernist Single-Glazed Curtain Wall Is an Endangered SpeciesAN 05_04.09.2014). Opinions expressed in letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions or sentiments of the newspaper. AN welcomes reader letters, which could appear in our regional print editions. To share your opinion, please email editor@archpaper.com]

Pamela Jerome’s thoughtful comment on mid-century modernist curtain walls raises a number of important issues that deserve further study.

Having successfully redeveloped two major twentieth century commercial buildings, I believe that those buildings are probably the least understood in all of preservation theory. They were built by unsentimental men in pursuit of trade, commerce, and wealth. There was never a moment’s hesitation to alter them time and again as tastes changed, neighborhoods evolved, and tenants came and went. Those commercial cultural issues are just as important as the aesthetic issues inevitably associated with any building, and they are very hard to reconcile.

Continue reading after the jump.

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Broad Collection Sues Seele over Problematic Los Angeles Museum Facade

Mockup of The Broad's GFRC panels (Matt Construction)

Mockup of The Broad’s GFRC panels. (Courtesy Matt Construction)

In a recent interview, Diller Scofidio + Renfro Senior Associate Kevin Rice told AN that the “veil” at Los Angeles’ Broad Museum—a facade made of hundreds of molded Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete (GFRC) panels, had been delayed by over a year. “Some of the things took longer to make than they thought, but there aren’t really problems with it,” Rice said.

But now it looks like the issues with the museum’s facade are more severe than initially thought.

Continue reading after the jump.

Jamie Carpenter Dresses up Dallas’ Cotton Bowl in Disco Fashion

Southwest
Tuesday, May 20, 2014
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(Courtesy Jamie Carpenter Design Associates)

Jamie Carpenter, the world-renowned architect who has left his mark on projects like New York City’s Millennium Tower, Brooklyn Bridge Park, and others, recently revealed his latest work, Light Veil, at Dallas’ Cotton Bowl Stadium. The Cotton Bowl Public Art Project, a $25.5 million endeavor aimed at revamping the stadium, included a contest that Carpenter won out for equipping the stadium with a new facade.

Continue reading after the jump.

Skyscraper Expert Gordon Gill Talks High-Performance Facades

Facade detail of Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture's Wuhan Greenland Center in Wuhan, China. (Courtesy Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture)

Facade detail of Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture’s Wuhan Greenland Center in Wuhan, China. (Courtesy Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture)

Architect Gordon Gill has one simple rule for facade design: seek performance first, and beauty will follow. Gill, who will give the opening keynote address at next month’s facades+PERFORMANCE conference in New York, is a founding partner at Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture, a firm known for pushing the boundaries of what architecture is and does. Gill and his team start by “establishing a language of architecture that’s based in the performance of a building,” he said. “We’re trying to understand the role of the building in the environment it’s being built in, then shape the building in order to benefit it the best way. Once we take that approach, the facades play a pretty rich role in either absorbing or reflecting the environment.”

More after the jump.

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