Inaugural Chicago architecture biennial has a name, and a show by Iwan Baan

Chicago, photographed by Iwan Baan.

Chicago, photographed by Iwan Baan.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel‘s announcement that Chicago would launch an international festival of art and architecture—its own take on the famous Venice biennale—drew jeers and cheers from the design community both near and far from The Second City. AN called for the show aspiring to be North America’s largest architectural exhibition to go beyond tourism bromides.

Now the upstart expo has a name, as well as its first show. Read More

Chicago announces inaugural architecture biennial to begin in 2015

Decay of the Dome exhibit at the 2010 Venice Biennale. (Lu Wenyu)

Decay of the Dome exhibit at the 2010 Venice Biennale. (Lu Wenyu)

Chicago, in a bid to boost its tourism industry and cultural cachet,  will host an international design exhibition next year modeled after the Venice Biennale, which every two years draws contributions from architects and artists from around the world. Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced the Chicago Architecture Biennial Tuesday.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Exploring Maggie’s Centres’ Architectural Approach to Cancer Care

East, On View
Friday, April 18, 2014
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(Courtesy Maggies' Centre)

Piers Gough’s Nottingham centre. (Courtesy Maggies’ Centre)

Maggie’s Centres: A Blueprint for Cancer Care
New York School of Interior Design, NYSID Gallery
161 East 69th Street, New York.
Gallery Hours: Tuesday – Saturday, 11am – 6pm
Through April 25, 2014

These are the requirements that were put to Richard Rogers, Zaha Hadid, Piers Gough, Steven Holl, Rem Koolhaas, Frank Gehry, and thus far eleven other architects when asked to design Maggie’s Centres, buildings in the U.K. where “free practical, emotional, and social support to people with cancer, their family and friends” are provided.

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Annual Ranking Lists the Top Architecture & Design Exhibitions of 2013

National
Friday, April 4, 2014
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Installation view of MoMA's 2013 exhibition Henri Labrouste: Structure Brought To Light. (Jonathan Muzikar / Courtesy MoMA)

Installation view of MoMA’s 2013 exhibition Henri Labrouste: Structure Brought To Light. (Jonathan Muzikar / Courtesy MoMA)

What was the most popular architecture or design exhibition in 2013? If you guessed MoMA’s Le Corbusier spectacular or SFMOMA’s landmark Lebbeus Woods: Architect (coming to New York’s Drawing Center April 15) you’re close but off the mark. In fact the most popular architecture exhibition in the world, according to The Art Newspaper‘s 2013 Visitors Figures was MoMA’s Henri Labrouste exhibition that drew 438,680 viewers (4,100 a day) compared to the Le Corbusier show that had 405,000 visitors (4,010 a day).

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On View> Pasadena’s Williamson Gallery puts Ray Eames in the spotlight

Art, Design, On View, West
Wednesday, April 2, 2014
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(Charles Eames / Eames Family Collection)

(Charles Eames / Eames Family Collection)

Ray Eames: In the Spotlight
Alyce de Roulet Williamson Gallery
Art Center College of Design, Hillside Campus
1400 Lida Street, Pasadena
Through May 4

Ray Eames: In the Spotlight features; letters, sketches, notes, photographs, paintings, films, process drawings, furniture, and collections that follow the great American designer’s interests and interactions with key places, people and institutions. Taken altogether, the presentation is an intimate study of Ray Eames’ world and seeks to get to the heart of her intensive hands-on creative process and the “way-it-should be-ness” that defined how Ray and Charles Eames lived and worked. In the Spotlight allows visitors to make their own connections to this great body of work, to explore their own creativity, and to apply Eames’ tools to their own lives.

On View> The Graham Foundation presents “Chromatic Patterns” through April 5

Art, Interiors, Midwest, On View
Tuesday, March 25, 2014
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(Courtesy Graham Foundation)

(Courtesy Graham Foundation)

Chromatic Patterns
Graham Foundation
4 West Burton Place
Chicago, IL
Through April 5

Judy Ledgerwood’s Chromatic Patterns is a site-specific work that transforms the lower galleries of the Graham Foundation’s historic Madlener House in Chicago. The house was designed by Richard E. Schmidt and Hugh M. G. Garden and built in 1901–02. Judy Ledgerwood is a Chicago-based painter and educator. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Award, an Artadia Award, a Tiffany Award in the Visual Arts, a National Endowment for the Arts Award, and an Illinois Art Council Award. This exhibition surrounds the visitor in vibrant colors with a vibrant floral motif that almost mimics the house’s prairie style ornamentation. This installation examines the effect of paint on architecture, specifically the wall covering’s ability to produce new effects and feelings about a space. In this work, Ledgerwood uses ornamentation to change visitors’ perception of the ornamentation in the Madlener House’s lower galleries, highlighting the divergent ways that pattern, color, ornamentation, and surface have been coded, gendered, repressed, and embraced in art and architecture.

On View> MoMA Presents “Isa Genzken: Retrospective” Through March 10

Art, On View
Monday, March 3, 2014
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Disco Soon (Ground Zero), 2008. (Courtesy MoMA)

Disco Soon (Ground Zero), 2008. (Courtesy MoMA)

Isa Genzken: Retrospective
Museum of Modern Art
New York
Through March 10, 2014

In the home stretch before it closes on March 10, Isa Genzken: Retrospective at MoMA shows a sculptor whose work is infused with architecture from her sleek early works of lacquered wood in the engineered Hyperbolos and Ellipsoids series to rougher experiments in plaster, concrete, and steel which resemble architectural maquettes on pedestals including Bank (1985), Rosa Zimmer (Pink Room) (1987), Galerie (1987), Kleiner Pavilion (1989), and Fenster (Window) (1990).

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Materials & Applications: Building Something (Beyond) Beautiful

Design, Newsletter, On View, West
Friday, January 31, 2014
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S'more by Edmund Ming Kip Kwong (M&A)

S’more by Edmund Ming Kip Kwong, at University Art Museum (Bruce Chan)

Materials & Applications: Building Something (Beyond) Beautiful, Projects 2002 – 2013
University Art Museum, Cal State Long Beach
Through April 13

On January 25th  a mix of architects, designers, collaborators, and previous staff showed up at the Cal State Long Beach University Art Museum to acknowledge ten years of exhibition work for Silver Lake–based outdoor gallery Materials & Applications. Over the past ten years M&A has been cultivating and showcasing the talents of experimental and young designers interested in testing architectural and landscape environments. Doris Sung, Jiminez Lai, Patterns, Oyler Wu Collaborative, FoxLin, Ball-Nogues Studio, NONDesigns, Anna Franke, Rob Ley, and Eddy Sykes are a few that have built work with M&A. At the center of the show sits the structure entitled S’more by New York–based Edmund Ming-Yip Kwong. This had been transported from M&A’s courtyard to the museum the week before.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Rome’s MAXXI Museum Honors Alessandro Anselmi

International, On View
Friday, January 31, 2014
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Crews install drawings for the exhibition. (Courtesy MAXXI)

Crews install drawings for the exhibition. (Courtesy MAXXI)

Opening this week at Rome’s MAXXI is an exhibition honoring the late Alessandro Anselmi. Curated by his son and associate Valentino Anselmi and Valerio Palmieri, this important exhibition consists of 100 exquisite drawings, models, and watercolors from the 1960s through 2002. The show is organized thematically to lead the viewer through various aspects of Anselmi’s ouerve: the Architect’s Dream, the Geometry of Memory, the Figuration of the Modern, Fragments and Enclosures, Geometrized Nature.

Among the projects on view are his cemetery of Parabita in Puglia, the State Archive in Florence, the restructuring of Piazza dei Navigatori in Rome. The exhibition highlights an architect who was in many ways radical, but fully inserted into the dynamics of the contemporary debate, but always guided by a passion for history, and intensely sensitive to issues of place and context. One senses his profoundly Roman formation. His vision—intimate and almost oneiric—allowing us to speculate on its possible metaphysical influences.

On View> MoMA Presents “Frank Lloyd Wright and the City: Density vs. Dispersal”

Art, City Terrain, East, On View, Urbanism
Tuesday, January 28, 2014
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Model of Frank Lloyd Wright's Broadacre City. (Courtesy MoMA)

Model of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Broadacre City. (Courtesy MoMA)

Frank Lloyd Wright and the City: Density vs. Dispersal
Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street, New York, NY
February 1 to June 1

Frank Lloyd Wright and the City: Density vs. Dispersal will represent the first exhibit resulting from the recent join acquisition of the architect’s archives by MoMA and Columbia University’s Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library. The models, drawings, and films found within the extensive collection will allow the museum to illustrate the tension in Wright’s urban thinking in the 1920s and 30s.

Even as he undertook projects that contributed to the increasingly vertical nature of American cities, he created a radical horizontal vision of urban life known as Broadacre City. The elaborate model of this agrarian metropolis created by Wright and his students will be displayed alongside the architect’s designs for the San Francsico Call Building, Mahattan’s St. Mark’s-in-the-Bouwerie Towers, and a largely theoretical mile-high skyscraper.

On View> “AFRITECTURE: Building Social Change” Explores the Best Architecture of Social Engagement

International, On View
Friday, December 6, 2013
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Floating School in Lagos, Nigeria. (Iwan Baan)

Floating School in Lagos, Nigeria. (Iwan Baan)

When Andres Lepik was a curator at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, he organized and curated Small Scale, Big Change: New Architectures of Social Engagement (2011). It was a landmark show for MoMA and identified a developing design trend of socially engaged projects aimed not at “grand manifestos” but to ones committed to “radical pragmatism.” Now back in Germany, Lepik has curated an equally ground breaking exhibition on social design. The exhibit Afritecture: Building Social Change at the TU Munich Architecture Museum rightly focuses on the African content as the most exciting and creative place for todays architecture of social engagement.

More after the jump.

Review> LOT-EK Designs the Exhibition, Erasmus Effect, On the Past and Future of Italian Architecture

International, On View
Friday, December 6, 2013
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(Cecilia Florenza)

(Cecilia Florenza)

The Erasmus Effect: Italian Architect’s Abroad
MAXXI Museum
Rome, Italy
Through April 6, 2014

The architecture and urbanism of Italy has long been an inspiration to architects from other parts of the world. From the grand tours of Lord Burlington and Thomas Jefferson to the establishment of the American, French, and British Academies, Robert Venturi’s lessons learned from Rome, and the enormous influence of Manfredo Tafuri, Italy has been important to how we view architecture and livable cities. But now an exhibition, The Erasmus Effect: Italian Architect’s Abroad, opening today at Rome’s MAXXI Museum details how the world is enriched when Italian born and educated architects emigrate and find success abroad.

Continue reading after the jump.

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