Eric Owen Moss explores the origins of innovation in architecture

Pterodactyl by Eric Owen Moss Architects. (Tom Bonner)

Pterodactyl by Eric Owen Moss Architects (Courtesy Tom Bonner)

Eric Owen Moss, principal and lead designer of Eric Owen Moss Architects, has spent decades in the metaphorical trenches of architectural practice. But when he speaks about truly innovative design, he harkens back to the literal trenches of World War I, where German architect Erich Mendelsohn sketched his Einstein Tower, later built in Potsdam. “Mendelsohn was drawing something that no one else was drawing,” explains Moss, who will deliver the afternoon keynote address at the upcoming Facades+ LA conference. “It was unique to him and his time and place.” Read More

Joshua Zabel talks digital collaboration in facade design

The SFMOMA expansion features the first major use of FRP cladding on a multi-story building in North America. (Tom Paiva / Kreysler & Associates)

The SFMOMA expansion features the first major use of FRP cladding on a multi-story building in North America. (Tom Paiva / Kreysler & Associates)

Kreysler & Associates‘ Joshua Zabel knows more than a thing or two about collaborating with architects to produce complex facades. “On the design side, increasingly complex projects call for earlier and earlier involvement from us for material and fabrication input,” said Zabel. “With increasing frequency we’re being called on by architects to contribute during SD and DD phases.”

Zabel will share the fabricator’s perspective on teamwork in high performance envelope design and construction later this week at Facades+AM Seattle. His co-presenters on “Digital Collaborations: Applications, Realities and Opportunities in the Delivery of Complex Facades” include Jeffrey Vaglio (Enclos), David Sandinsky (NBBJ) and Marne Zahner (Magnusson Klemencic Associates).

Continue after the jump.

Energy strategist Sangeetha Divakar on the role of digital techniques in facade design

OMA/LMN's Seattle Central Library. (Andrew Smith / Flickr)

OMA/LMN’s Seattle Central Library. (Andrew Smith / Flickr)

Digital techniques including parametrization play an increasingly important role in the work of many architects, engineers, and builders, especially those involved in the design and fabrication of high performance facades.

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Computational Ecologies: Inside the 2015 ACADIA Conference in Cincinnati

Architecture, National, Technology
Tuesday, November 3, 2015
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"Reciprocal Artifacts," Michael Leighton Beaman + Zaneta Hong (Beta-field). (John Stoughton/AN)

“Reciprocal Artifacts,” Michael Leighton Beaman + Zaneta Hong (Beta-field). (John Stoughton/AN)

The 35th annual conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) took place in Cincinnati (at Peter Eisenman’s infamous DAAP Building) in late October. The international conference is a three-day long academic event presenting peer-reviewed research and experimental work of 50 computational designers, students, and architects. Topics range from material science, biomimesis, geomimesis, robotics, environmental parametrics, and ecological urbanism.

More after the jump.

KVA Brings Digital Brick to Harvard

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As part of an extensive renovation, Kennedy & Violich Architecture re-skinned Tozzer Library in a high performance brick, glass, and copper envelope. (John Horner Photography)

As part of an extensive renovation, Kennedy & Violich Architecture re-skinned Tozzer Library in a high performance brick, glass, and copper envelope. (John Horner Photography)

Old and new technologies combine in renovated anthropology building.

Tasked with transforming Harvard‘s 1971 Tozzer Library into a new home for the university’s Anthropology Department, Kennedy & Violich Architecture (KVA) faced a unique set of challenges. Read More

Höweler+Yoon combine cutting-edge tech and age-old craft to complete the Sean Collier Memorial at MIT

Sean Collier Memorial. Photo by Scott Newland. Courtesy Howeler + Yoon.

Sean Collier Memorial. (Scott Newland / Courtesy Howeler + Yoon)

On April 18th, 2013, the Boston Marathon bombers went on a crime spree that included the killing of Officer Sean Collier who was shot in the line of duty on the MIT campus. In honor of the slain MIT patrol officer, the university commissioned Boston-based Höweler+Yoon Architecture to design the Sean Collier Memorial—a somber, grey stone structure that marks the site of the tragedy. The heaviness of the unreinforced, fully compressive masonry structure is meant to convey the concept of “Collier Strong,” or strength through unity.

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Learn and Earn CES LU Credits at Facades+ Los Angeles

Architecture, Technology, West
Thursday, January 15, 2015
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Facades+ tech workshops offer hands-on exposure to digital design methods.

Facades+ tech workshops offer hands-on exposure to digital design methods.

In the fast-paced world of building design, hands-on instruction in new methods can be hard to come by. Next month, attendees at Facades+ LA can take advantage of a unique opportunity for one-on-one guidance in digital tools at tech workshops intimately connected to the themes of the conference. “The tech workshops are a great way to learn cutting edge methods that are regularly at the core of what is presented in the symposium and dialog sessions,” remarked Thornton Tomasetti‘s Matt Naugle, a veteran Facades+ tech workshop instructor.

More info after the jump.

Dig Deep into Digital Design at Facades+ Dallas

Facades+ tech workshops offer hands-on exposure to cutting-edge design software.

Facades+ tech workshops offer hands-on exposure to cutting-edge design software.

Today’s AEC professionals are more to reach for a computer mouse then they are a drafting pencil. Understanding and being able fully utilize cutting-edge digital design tools is essential to contemporary architectural practice, particularly the design of high-performance building skins. Attendees at next month’s Facades+ Dallas conference can choose among four hands-on tech workshops in a unique program designed to deliver in-depth exposure to platforms including Autodesk Revit, Autodesk Vasari, and Grasshopper.

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Martha Schwartz’ Hillside Mountain Range

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Fengming Mountain Park features a series of metal pavilions imagined as abstracted mountains. (Terrence Zhang)

Fengming Mountain Park features a series of metal pavilions imagined as abstracted mountains. (Terrence Zhang)

Illuminated steel pavilions mimic Chinese peaks.

The hillside site of Fengming Mountain Park, in Chongqing, China, presented Martha Schwartz Partners with both a practical challenge and a source of inspiration. Asked by Chinese developer Vanke to design a park adjacent to the sales office for a new housing development, the landscape architecture and urban planning firm quickly gravitated toward the metaphor of a mountain journey. “That’s why in the plans you see a zig zag pattern” to the path leading down to the sales center from the car park, said associate Ignacio López Busón. Steel pavilions scattered along the walkway pick up on the theme, taking the form of abstracted mountain peaks. “That’s something the client really liked,” said López Busón. “Once the idea was clear, it was all about developing the shape of them, and trying to make them look special.”
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Interactive Thermoplastic Pavilion by B+U

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(Joshua White)

Baumgartner+Uriu designed and built Apertures with students from SCI-Arc. (Joshua White)

A thin shell pavilion with an audio feedback program invites engagement.

Apertures, the amorphous pavilion designed and fabricated by Baumgartner+Uriu (B+U) with students from SCI-Arc, challenges two of architecture’s defining dualities: the distinction between wall and window, and the division between exterior and interior. “Conceptually, we were looking at objects that are multi-directional and have apertures as their main theme,” said partner Herwig Baumgartner. “That was one aspect of it; the other was the barriers between inside and outside and how we can dissolve these. We’re interested in architecture that’s responsive through either movement or sound.” As visitors pass through or otherwise engage with the 16-foot-tall, 1/8-inch-thick structure’s many rounded openings, attached heat sensors trigger sounds based on human bio-rhythms, creating a feedback loop that encourages active exploration of the space. Read More

Hands-On Exposure to Cutting-Edge Technology at facades+Chicago

Participants in facades+ tech workshops learn and practice cutting-edge digital design technologies in an intimate setting.

Participants in facades+ tech workshops learn and practice cutting-edge digital design technologies in an intimate setting.

Contemporary architectural practice, and in particular the design of high-performance facades, is as much about mastering technology as it is about grappling with aesthetics and function. Attendees at next month’s facades+ Chicago conference will have an opportunity to explore cutting-edge digital design tools during a series of hands-on technology workshops. The tech workshops, which take place on the second day of the conference, follow a day-long symposium featuring keynotes and roundtable discussions by AEC industry leaders. “If on day 1 you’re being exposed to advancements in building methods, on day 2 you can learn the technology and techniques that are behind those applications,” said Mode Lab’s Ronnie Parsons. “It’s taking the next step from someone who’s in the audience to being a participant. Not just a participant who’s watching and engaged, but one who is actively involved in shaping what happens tomorrow.” Read More

James Timberlake to US AEC Industry: Bring Facade Manufacturing Home

KieranTimberlake's Edgar N. Putnam Event Pavilion, James A. Michener Art Museum. (Michael Moran/OTTO)

KieranTimberlake’s Edgar N. Putnam Event Pavilion, James A. Michener Art Museum. (Michael Moran/OTTO)

KieranTimberlake has long pushed the boundaries of conventional facade design. The Philadelphia-based firm started using pressure-equalized rain screen systems in the 1980s, well before other architects brought the technology on board. Their Melvin J. and Claire Levine Hall, at the University of Pennsylvania (2003), was the first actively ventilated curtain wall in North America. The designers at KieranTimberlake have introduced new materials and assemblies, such as the SmartWrap building skin deployed at Cellophane House, part of MoMA’s Home Delivery: Fabricating the Modern Dwelling exhibit. One of the firm’s latest projects, the Embassy of the United States, London, incorporates an outer envelope of three-dimensional ETFE (ethylene tetrafluoroethylene) panels with integrated photovoltaic cells.

Continue reading after the jump.

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