Spare a billion or two to help build a real life version of Tolkien’s Minas Tirith?

(Courtesy Realise Minas Tirith)

(Courtesy Realise Minas Tirith)

There’s something about those CGI scenes of Middle Earth in Peter Jackson’s adaptation of The Lord of the Rings that really tickles the imagination. Apparently, they’re inspirational enough to prod one group in Southern England to put together a campaign to build a real life version of J.R.R. Tolkien’s hilled city of Minas Tirith. And they’re asking the world to fund it.

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On View> Glimmering light installation recalls the destroyed baronial towers of Bannerman’s Castle near New York City

Art, East, Lighting, On View, Preservation
Tuesday, August 4, 2015
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(Rob Penner)

We head home: through the gloss of rain or weight
of snow, or the plum blush of dusk, but always—home, …
facing the stars
hope—a new constellation
waiting for us to map it,
waiting for us to name it—together.

—One Day, by Robert Blanco. Written for the second Inauguration of President Barack Obama, January 21, 2013.

Melissa McGill’s light-based public art project, Constellation, arises from the romantic ruins of Bannerman’s Castle on Pollepel Island, a mysterious sight glimpsed from trains heading north 50 miles from New York City just shy of Beacon, and nearby to West Point and Storm King. If you’ve ever wondered about this fleeting apparition, this art installation, which will be up for two years, is the perfect vehicle for visiting the island or gazing from the riverbank.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Quest to Save A Mysterious Hudson River Castle

East, Preservation
Thursday, January 16, 2014
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(Dan Dvorscak/Flickr)

Preservationists are at work attempting to salvage what remains of a New York architectural oddity. The strange medieval-looking structure known as Bannerman’s Castle is located on Pollepel Island, a small stretch of land about 60 miles north of Manhattan on the Hudson River. Scottish-American Arms mogul Francis Bannerman IV built the series of buildings in the early 20th century to act as a personal residence and home to his extensive arsenal. Since the 1920s, however, the castle has suffered from neglect and a series of devastating storms and fires that contribute to its current dilapidated state.

Continue reading after the jump.

Restored ruins of Astley Castle Win UK’s prestigious 2013 RIBA Stirling Prize

Restored Ruins of Astley Castle Win 2013 Riba Stirling Prize (Courtesy Bruce Stokes / Flickr)

Restored Ruins of Astley Castle in Warwickshire, England Win 2013 RIBA Stirling Prize as Best Building of the Year (Courtesy Bruce Stokes / Flickr)

A few years ago, 12th-century-built Astley Castle was no more than a fire-ravaged, crumbling medieval structure in the English countryside.

Now, since its clever restoration by Witherford Watson Mann Architects in 2012, the Landmark Trust-sponsored residence in Warwickshire has been deemed “building of the year” as the winner of the most prestigious architectural prize in the United Kingdom, the Royal Institute of British Architects’ 2013 Stirling Prize. With its fortified ruins artfully incorporated into contemporary construction as a luxury vacation home, RIBA President Stephen Hodder praised the Astley Castle restoration as “an exceptional example of how modern architecture can revive an ancient monument.”

However, this year RIBA was unable to secure a sponsor to provide the £20,000 given to winners of the past, BD Online reported. This is the first year that the Stirling Prize comes with no cash value.

Continue Reading After the Jump.

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